Thread: Captivity poll

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Old 24th April 2007   #15 (permalink)
Tim Johnson
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I haven't carefully read through this entire thread but I'd like to suggest that there's nothing "green" or "environmentally friendly" about Cynops pyrrhogaster in that it's not a species in which there are many CB ones available to begin with, nor is it particularly easy to raise morphs to adulthold, which takes years and a lot of attention. So certainly it's not in the same category as say axoltls and P. waltl. But sure, it's an especially hardy, active and attractive (to me at least) species.

Anyway, interesting thread Click the image to open in full size. I've always recommended axolotls and P. waltl to newcomers to the hobby as far as aquatic newts go, and fire and tiger salamanders for those who prefer terrestrial animals. Still, tigers are not that visible, or shouldn't be kept that way at least, and also the number of people who have ever bred them can probably be counted on one hand. At the same time it can be said that they're plentiful enough in nature to be used as fish bait in some parts of their range...

Marbled newts are wonderful too -- easy to breed, easy to raise, and oh so beautiful.

(Message edited by TJ on April 24, 2007)
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