The longest running Amphibian Community on the Internet.

Tags Register FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Caudata.org Store


Woodice culture

This is a discussion on Woodice culture within the Scuds, Freshwater Shrimp, Slaters, Woodlice, etc forums, part of the Food: Live, Frozen, Freeze-Dried, Pellets, etc category; I'm thinking of starting a woodlice culture for my salamander, how should i get started? What size tub should i ...

Reply

 

LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 9th July 2012   #1 (permalink)
Member
 
speckles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Posts: 99
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: speckles has shown reliable knowledge
Default Woodice culture

I'm thinking of starting a woodlice culture for my salamander, how should i get started? What size tub should i keep them in, i have a 5 gallon plastic critter tank, is that big enough to get started? Is it too late in the year to start, i read somewhere they only will make offspring during certain months.I know it takes a couple of months for there to be enough there for a stable food source.



speckles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th July 2012   #2 (permalink)
Member
 
nwmnnaturalist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Age: 34
Posts: 229
Gallery Images: 9
Comments: 0
Rep: nwmnnaturalist is a well respected, valued and knowledgeable member of Caudata.orgnwmnnaturalist is a well respected, valued and knowledgeable member of Caudata.orgnwmnnaturalist is a well respected, valued and knowledgeable member of Caudata.orgnwmnnaturalist is a well respected, valued and knowledgeable member of Caudata.orgnwmnnaturalist is a well respected, valued and knowledgeable member of Caudata.orgnwmnnaturalist is a well respected, valued and knowledgeable member of Caudata.org
Default Re: Woodice culture

It's good to get started by finding some decaying hardwoods that hold moisture in the wood. If there is moss and/or algae growing on it, they'll like it more. They don't want anything too wet, but just damp enough to the touch. Mulched, decaying leaves, pine needles, forest soils and wood with benign fungi like Green Stain, Dry Rot (or Wet Rot) or polyphores would be fine, since they like to eat them and it's not toxic.

Keeping a good population in the terrarium can be helpful as well, since they are good at keeping mold and fungus issues down, as well as cleaning up the droppings of the salamander.

Just as long as everything is gathered without having chemicals on it, you'll be fine. 5 gallons should be fine until you see crowding problems. Then you can upgrade to a bigger tote. A plastic tote bin is fine for a habitat, as long as there are a few small holes for some ventilation.



nwmnnaturalist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th July 2012   #3 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Posts: 35
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: noneofmany has started on the right path
Default Re: Woodice culture

How often do wood lice breed? I put several smaller ones in my terrarium with the my juvenile A. Macrodactlyum but I think they only ate two of them. However, about a week after I added them I saw almost microscopic little white ones crawling around and on one night while I was shining a red light into the cage one of the salamanders emerged from his hide spot and grabbed on of the tiny babies. After that I put a bigger female in that had previously had eggs on her and another larger one in hopes of them having more babies.

Do wood lice breed more than once in their life? How long might it take for a female wood louse to get gravid again and hatch more eggs?

Like wise what kind of nutritional value do they have? I've heard that they aren't good as a primary food source because they have to much calcium carbonate, but what about the tiniest newborns? They don't seem to have any real hard parts on them. Are they better?



noneofmany is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30th March 2013   #4 (permalink)
Member
 
speckles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Posts: 99
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: speckles has shown reliable knowledge
Default Re: Woodice culture

well i am getting an early start this year on my woodlice culture, i'm going to a wooded area nearby that i know isn't sprayed with pesticides to get a jump on my starter colony. But someone from a frog forum showed me a link to a woodlice culture website that sends you woodlice so that is a possibility if i don't get a very good start.



speckles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th July 2013   #5 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Posts: 2
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: nirotorin is an unknown quantity at this point
Default Re: Woodice culture

Quote:
Originally Posted by noneofmany View Post
How often do wood lice breed? I put several smaller ones in my terrarium with the my juvenile A. Macrodactlyum but I think they only ate two of them. However, about a week after I added them I saw almost microscopic little white ones crawling around and on one night while I was shining a red light into the cage one of the salamanders emerged from his hide spot and grabbed on of the tiny babies. After that I put a bigger female in that had previously had eggs on her and another larger one in hopes of them having more babies.

Do wood lice breed more than once in their life? How long might it take for a female wood louse to get gravid again and hatch more eggs?

Like wise what kind of nutritional value do they have? I've heard that they aren't good as a primary food source because they have to much calcium carbonate, but what about the tiniest newborns? They don't seem to have any real hard parts on them. Are they better?
They reproduce fairly fast and frequently. The newborns do make good feeders. I've never heard of them having too much calcium to be good feeders. You should always vary your animals diets though.



nirotorin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th July 2013   #6 (permalink)
2010 Research Grant Donor
 
michael's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Posts: 3,102
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: michael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.orgmichael is considered an Authority at Caudata.org
Default Re: Woodice culture

Quote:
Originally Posted by noneofmany View Post
How often do wood lice breed?
It depends on what kind of wood lice. Some of the larger one take nearly a year to reach sexual maturity and are slow going. Some of the small ones are pretty prolific. The dwarf white ones are all females and produce offspring rapidly. I keep about 10 kinds of isopods and use them for food for both aquatic and terrestrial salamanders.



michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th July 2013   #7 (permalink)
Prolific Member
 
Coastal Groovin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Posts: 923
Gallery Images: 1
Comments: 7
Rep: Coastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.orgCoastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.orgCoastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.orgCoastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.orgCoastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.orgCoastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.orgCoastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.orgCoastal Groovin is a mainstay of Caudata.org
Default Re: Woodice culture

What are you going to be feeding aquatic animals or land animals? Some isopods are better for aquatic newts. Porcellionides sp. are great culture animals Woodlice - Porcellionides pruinosus - BugGuide.Net These closely related species in general are very good. A medium sized isopod it crawls fast on land and actually crawls just as fast on plants underwater where my newts just pick them off. They reproduce very well for me. I also like them because their exoskeloton is very soft for an isopod and easily digestible compared to other types. I started with just around 10 and after about 7-8 months had about 400. I kept them in a 30 gallon plastic container with 2 inches of dirt which was covered with bark and mixed tree leaves. I feed my isopods a large pinch of fish flakes once a week. Container width is more important than hieight. It's the ground space that is important. I have found that most comman species are just to slow at reproducing. Example being P.Scaber reproduce to slow and I find just collecting them when needed to be easier. I save my culture all year, letting it grow for months and then use them in the winter when collecting worms and other food items isn't possible. When I get down to about 200 I stop using them as food and start waiting for the spring explosion of babies. I always say I'm going to start a second and third culture so I can rotate through the but I never do even though I should. Free food is the best!!!



__________________
Axolotls the other white meat.
Coastal Groovin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

LinkBack
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads

Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Caudata culture down merk199 Forum Questions (technical, not newts!) 3 19th May 2012 12:56
Daphnia culture asfouts Daphnia, Moina, brine shrimp, etc 2 16th April 2012 14:43
Worms and Woodice drew121 Live Food General Discussion 0 6th May 2010 11:41
culture. EdsExotics Newt and Salamander Help 8 18th May 2009 17:20
how to culture? FredLikesNewts Springtails (Collembolla), Firebrats, Silverfish, etc 4 21st July 2008 17:57


All times are GMT. The time now is 16:16.