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Cynops pyrrhogaster in the wild - Special!

This is a discussion on Cynops pyrrhogaster in the wild - Special! within the Fire-Belly & Sword-Tail Newts (Cynops & Hypselotriton) forums, part of the Species, Genus & Family Discussions category; ...

Fire-Belly & Sword-Tail Newts (Cynops & Hypselotriton) Perhaps the most famous and frequently bred newts in captivity, the fire-bellied newts and sword-tail newts are well known throughout the world as being excellent, gregarious captives.

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Old 28th March 2004   #1 (permalink)
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Old 28th March 2004   #2 (permalink)
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Here's another next to an H.tokyoensis egg sac:

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(these are night shots, by the way Click the image to open in full size.)

(Message edited by TJ on March 28, 2004)



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Old 3rd April 2004   #3 (permalink)
samuel
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Tim, u never cease to amazeClick the image to open in full size.. Hmm, not much plants in their pool i realized. I thought they lived in heavily planted lakes and pools.



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Old 3rd April 2004   #4 (permalink)
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Heya Sam. ThanksClick the image to open in full size. Well, I think they just happened to be in this part of the pond at this particular time. A lot of these ponds have fallen leaves in them and I'm told the newts spend a lot of their time among and under these leaves. Anyway, I'll be visiting this very pond tomorrow during the day so let's see what there is to see then Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 3rd April 2004   #5 (permalink)
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Hi Tim,
Very nice pics.
How about getting us some habitat pics?Click the image to open in full size.
It seems to be very beautiful over there. I can see why C.Ensicauda, C.Pyrrhogaster and T.Johnson chose JapanClick the image to open in full size.



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Old 4th April 2004   #6 (permalink)
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Hey, while ur there do try to check out the natural prey items of them. shd be very informative for Pyrrhogaster keepers.Click the image to open in full size..

Sam



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Old 7th April 2004   #7 (permalink)
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Sorry to keep you in suspense but last weekend's trip was postponed due to heavy rain. It's been reset for Saturday.

The lowland, stillwater target species are C.pyrrhogaster and H.tokyoensis (Tokyo Salamander), while the highland, river-dwelling target species are H.kimurae (Hida Salamander) and Onychodactylus japonicus (Japanese Clawed Salamander).

Jesper, I'll be sure to post more habitat pics.

Sam, budding amateur naturalist I may be Click the image to open in full size., but I doubt I'd be able to identify their natural prey items. There is, however, a detailed report around somewhere about it that I'll try to dig out. I met the person who wrote it and he assured me no newts were sacrificed in the process. Their stomachs were pumped, not dissected. One thing I do know is that C.p are fattening up on tadpoles this time of year Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 7th April 2004   #8 (permalink)
mark
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Hi Tim nice pics,
Do you know what kind of plant that is in the third pic?
And another question, in your last post you said,
"One thing I do know is that C.p are fattening up on tadpoles this time of year",
does this mean they will be eating the H.tokyoensis larvae that will hatch out of that egg sac?




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Old 7th April 2004   #9 (permalink)
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Thanks, Mark. But sorry to say I know next to nothing about plants Click the image to open in full size. As for the H.tokyoensis larvae, I think they're too sharp and quick to be caught in any numbers, if at all, by C.p adults. They have much more to fear from...other H.tokyoensis larvae! The larvae of this species are highly cannibalistic.



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Old 11th April 2004   #10 (permalink)
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These were found in this stream pool:

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A broader view of the same:

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(Message edited by TJ on April 11, 2004)



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Old 11th April 2004   #11 (permalink)
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Old 11th April 2004   #12 (permalink)
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Old 11th April 2004   #13 (permalink)
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Hi tim

wow i really like these pics, gives me a good idear how they live,in the mean time my
Cynops pyrrhogaster kanto and intermediate race have started laying eggs and i,m planning to raise about 40 per race.
any breedings out there with other c.p races?

my animals are with locality data and i will post pics soon

Greetings reinder



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Old 11th April 2004   #14 (permalink)
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I must say that the nature seems pretty amazing over there, something in between what we have here and a jungle.

Why do I get the feeling that you are constantly on field trips Tim?
I thought one had to work 24/7 to afford living in JapanClick the image to open in full size.

Two japanese girls have come to work on the lab I am at, they are so polite that they make me feel like an ogreClick the image to open in full size.



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Old 11th April 2004   #15 (permalink)
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Hi Reinder, glad to hear of your breeding plans. I am currently raising some C.p larvae myself with locality data for the adults, but not seriously. I look forward to seeing those pics Click the image to open in full size.

Jesper, I made a resolution to get out and about more this year. Last year, I only talked about doing so Click the image to open in full size.

This pic gives a good idea of how they can be really hard to spot:

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Old 11th April 2004   #16 (permalink)
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Old 12th April 2004   #17 (permalink)
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Have you seen what they eat in those pools?, it looks less abundant in food sources than the ponds you have photgraphed before
Chris



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Old 12th April 2004   #18 (permalink)
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Chris, I was at this location for only a half hour or so, so I had no time to observe their feeding habits. But I doubt they lack for food as there are plenty of insects and tadpoles in the wider area. The stream is just a short distance away from paddy fields where we had expected to find them, but couldn't. In fact, we were surprised to find them in the stream instead.

Also, I should point out that some of those photos are of newts caught in the meter-deep pool seen in the back in the habitat pics but released in shallow water for observation and picture-taking, so one shouldn't really infer much from them Click the image to open in full size.

The pool itself was much too murky to get decent pics. Most of the newts emerged from under fallen, decaying leaves that had sunk to the bottom of the pool. In the shallow area of the stream, the water flow was way too fast for it to be a suitable feeding area for them.

I'll be going back to this site on occasion for more detailed observations, so stay tuned Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 14th June 2004   #19 (permalink)
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Click the image to open in full size.

This time I visited C.p habitats in the northern prefecture of Fukushima, guided by a local amphibian expert.

Click the image to open in full size. Click the image to open in full size.

In a valley filled with rice paddies, we found two morphologically dissimilar "types" of pyrrhogaster in close proximity to each other. The first group, gathered from a small irrigation pond, was comprised of newts that were relatively small, smooth and uniformly dark colored on the dorsum, The second group -- found closer to the forest, at a slightly higher elevation, and in only a couple of paddies and adjoining small irrigation canal -- comprised larger newts with lighter color on the dorsum, some of them faintly spotted, and with a somewhat different pattern of venter markings than those of the first group.

(Message edited by TJ on June 15, 2004)



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Old 15th June 2004   #20 (permalink)
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Considering local variation, I thought it'd be interesting to show belly patterns of newts caught in the same pond, rather those from the same prefecture, same district or same village even. These are all from the first group:

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(Message edited by tj on June 15, 2004)



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