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Amphiuma care

This is a discussion on Amphiuma care within the Large Aquatic Salamanders (Hellbenders/Cryptobranchids, Necturus, Siren, etc.) forums, part of the Species, Genus & Family Discussions category; Hello, I found a local shop stocked with a few amphiumas and I want to get one. CAn i get ...

Large Aquatic Salamanders (Hellbenders/Cryptobranchids, Necturus, Siren, etc.) This topic covers Cryptobranchids like the hellbender and Asian giant salamanders, as well as sirens, mud puppies, and amphiumas.


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Old 28th May 2004   #1 (permalink)
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Hello, I found a local shop stocked with a few amphiumas and I want to get one. CAn i get a general care sheet for a 12 inch three toed amphiuma amphiumidae tridactylum



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Old 29th May 2004   #2 (permalink)
edward
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Hi Kevin,
The caresheet for caudate central is out for review but at that size you can keep them like you would a greater or lesser siren. You can check out the care sheet for lesser sirens on caudate central.
If you have more specific questions post them here and we will try and help you out.

Ed



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Old 31st May 2004   #3 (permalink)
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Is 20 gallon long big enough for now



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Old 1st June 2004   #4 (permalink)
edward
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Hi Kevin,
For right now it will hold a 12 inch three toed but expect to upgrade to a 55 gallon or a 75 gallon tank between six months and a year.

Ed



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Old 1st July 2004   #5 (permalink)
kaysie
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Try earthworms.



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Old 2nd July 2004   #6 (permalink)
edward
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I wouldn't be worried unless it was thin and did not eat for a couple of weeks. Did you check out the sheet on caudata culture?

Ed



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Old 2nd July 2004   #7 (permalink)
josh
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http://www.caudata.org/cc/species/Am...Amphiuma.shtml



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Old 6th July 2004   #8 (permalink)
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Hello guys, i bought it and a new tank for it too. A 46 gallon, it is planted not heavily though and there is a little piece of land where it hangs out under the moist moss. I have had it for about a month and havent actually seen it eat but the earthworms and ghost shrimp seem to disappear so i guess i am getting the job done. It is living with a siren, gecko, and one small quarter sized turtle which just stays out of the way on the turtle dock thanks for all of the help
Kevin



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Old 6th July 2004   #9 (permalink)
kaysie
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Kevin, this is a bad idea. 1. Geckos have different temperature requirements than caudates (especially amphiumas). 2. Mixing of species is generally discouraged. It's just a bad idea. Read http://www.caudata.org/cc/articles/M...isasters.shtml for reasons why. 3. Anything smaller than a caudate will end up being caudate food (or attempted caudate food), so the turtle is probably in peril.



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Old 7th July 2004   #10 (permalink)
greg
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He sounds pretty happy to me. i'd be more worried about one that's active and moving around all the time. Most of the time that I've seen this in Siren or Amphiuma or Cryptobranchus there's a water quality issue. Changing filter and water helped in those cases. In some cases too active was too warm.

Look at it this way, if he's burried in the bottom of the tank, he isn't trying to get out (unless he thinks he can dig out).

And I must agree with Mike too. Gecko + Siren + turtle = Yummy

and what the heck gecko lives anywhere near these things naturally? no native geckos for sure. (well.. if you SQUINT you could maybe find Sphaerodactylus notatus where you find these... but not really... not in the same habitat for sure). Geckos tend to not swim well and amphiuma tend to eat anything that fits in the mouth, and some things that don't.

Just don't put things together on one tank because they fit. It's not a suitcase.

Greg



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Old 7th July 2004   #11 (permalink)
jesse
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alot of the larger salamanders seem to be very sit and wait types, i know mudpuppies are and the hellbender that they had at my college was the same way.



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Old 7th July 2004   #12 (permalink)
kaysie
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It's easier to conserve energy and wait for food to come by than it is to chase after it. That'd be the life... Anyone got a tank big enough for me?



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Old 7th July 2004   #13 (permalink)
edward
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There are introduced Hemidactylus within the range for that species.
Ed



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Old 8th July 2004   #14 (permalink)
jesse
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i thiink i have one in the back of my closet, but based on my knowledge of female humans, id be better off with the most complicated sensitive expensive to keep caudate and be better offClick the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 8th July 2004   #15 (permalink)
kaysie
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Lol, Jesse, I'm the same way with guys. The nerd in me scares them away.



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Old 8th July 2004   #16 (permalink)
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no its not the nerd, its jsut that girls are so damn complicated. I swear! i have an easier time figuring out an animal that doesnt talk than a girl who does talk!



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Old 8th July 2004   #17 (permalink)
kaysie
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Yeah, girls suck... Its a good thing I'm not normal. Maybe thats part of my problem....



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Old 8th July 2004   #18 (permalink)
greg
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"introduced" and within the range. In other words, not native to where the Amphiuma is native.

And, not aquatic.

Point remains, mixed species enclosures are temporary things and usually result in blood stains when one of them is an large (or growing) predator. Of course the odds are about equal the the Hemidactylus will drown before it is eaten. Sure, they do okay dispersing in floating things across water, but I suspect most such dispersal occurs with eggs that don't wander around and slip into the water. Scansers don't work so well when they are water-logged.

Greg



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Old 9th July 2004   #19 (permalink)
edward
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Hi Greg,
As they are pretty much here to stay, we probably should at some point accept them as native.
How many people are unaware that many game fish or pheasents are not native to the locations where they may be found. They are just as alien to those sites.

Ed



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Old 9th July 2004   #20 (permalink)
greg
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Ed. yer right. They are here to stay.. until Boiga gets here that is, or the Varanus in FL eat them. Or mongoose. Of course, if he has Hemidactylus turcicus from FL that's almost rare now in many areas due to H. mabouia eating them and out-competing them.

I live in CT... and I do remind people at every educational opportunity that the STATE stocked non native species into wetlands for fishermen to catch. this has a long history in New England, of course. But lately folks have started to realize that hey... those German Brown Trout live in the same place that native brook trout could.. hmm... and that many of our endangered fish are small and essentially bass food.

hmm..

Eventually, the world will be bullfrogs, Bufo marinus, Boiga, Hemidactylus, blue gill and ringneck pheasant... oh.. and cudzu, purple loosestrif and mowed (chem) lawns.

shudder to think.



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