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Swimmming ......

This is a discussion on Swimmming ...... within the Plethodontids and Lungless Salamanders (Bolitoglossa, Eurycea, Plethodon, etc.) forums, part of the Species, Genus & Family Discussions category; today i came home and found my leadback morph swimming in the water dish.... it was an unusual sight because ...

Plethodontids and Lungless Salamanders (Bolitoglossa, Eurycea, Plethodon, etc.) The largest, and one of the most diverse groups of salamanders, these salamanders have all evolved to breathe solely through their skin and are found almost exclusively in North America.

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Old 27th October 2005   #1 (permalink)
lee
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today i came home and found my leadback morph swimming in the water dish.... it was an unusual sight because from what I've read and seen he dosen't like the water .... a pleasant surprise tho...



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Old 28th October 2005   #2 (permalink)
john
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It was probably getting a bit dry in it's hide. It's not necessary to provide a water dish so long as you keep the enclosure humidity high by misting it every day or every other day.



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Old 29th October 2005   #3 (permalink)
lee
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well ... right now i mist it 2 times a day and i have the water dish in there is that overkill .... should i take the dish out?



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Old 30th October 2005   #4 (permalink)
russ
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No, don't take it out. I have a redback from WI that I see in the water dish quite often, and the enclosure is not dry at all. It came from a boggy area, that may have something to do with it.



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Old 30th October 2005   #5 (permalink)
lee
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ok thank you .....



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Old 8th November 2005   #6 (permalink)
russ
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And here it is to set the example. It was actually submerged in the water when I first checked it but came out on the bark before I could get my camera.
<center>Click the image to open in full size.</center>



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Old 8th November 2005   #7 (permalink)
john
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hmmm, that's a very interesting picture. The snout on this specimen is much more narrow (or at least appears to be) than those I have. Russ, how many of these do you keep together? I've had lots of problems with this species when keeping them in groups. They all look healthy and are eating and then I check on them the next day and one is dead. This has happened two or three times. I've kept no more than 3 at any given time in a 10g tank. At this point, I keep the only two I have left separated and I'm not going to acquire any more because of the trouble I've had with them.



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Old 8th November 2005   #8 (permalink)
russ
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Just the one. I meant to take it back to where I collected it before I moved and never made it back. He's part of my son's collection now.



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Old 9th November 2005   #9 (permalink)
erik
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Interesting. I have found Batrachoseps before totally submerged in a pool at the base of a seepage area. I though it was strange but maybe this type of behavior isn't that unusual.



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Old 9th November 2005   #10 (permalink)
russ
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The oddest "wrong habitat" I've seen was with Aneides hardii. I found some under rocks along a stream with some actually setting in the water. When disturbed almost all of them went for the water to escape. And this was during a good monsoon season, so it wasn't like the surrounding "normal" habitat was dry.



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Old 9th November 2005   #11 (permalink)
mark
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I've found P. cinereus and P. electromorphus under rocks along streams and seeps sitting in puddles of water. In South Carolina I would find P. variolatus underneath saturated logs alongside Eurycea quadridigitata. Upon startling them they would dive into water-filled crayfish burrows in an attempt to avoid capture. Another individual found under a less soggy log alongside a ditch actually slipped into the water (approximately 30 cm deep) and swam a few feet and hid in leaf litter. I was so dumbfounded by what had happened by the time I gathered my wits about me the salamander was long gone in the detritus.



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