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Gyrinophilus porphyriticus

This is a discussion on Gyrinophilus porphyriticus within the Plethodontids and Lungless Salamanders (Bolitoglossa, Eurycea, Plethodon, etc.) forums, part of the Species, Genus & Family Discussions category; Is this one among the type of Plethodontid sals that Nate was suggesting, if I remember correctly, could gradually be ...

Plethodontids and Lungless Salamanders (Bolitoglossa, Eurycea, Plethodon, etc.) The largest, and one of the most diverse groups of salamanders, these salamanders have all evolved to breathe solely through their skin and are found almost exclusively in North America.

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Old 16th October 2003   #1 (permalink)
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Is this one among the type of Plethodontid sals that Nate was suggesting, if I remember correctly, could gradually be kept completely aquatic? Any other info about the ease/difficulty of keeping this one aside from providing good water quality?



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Old 16th October 2003   #2 (permalink)
nate
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Yeah, they'll go completely aquatic for you in captivity. Very easy to feed, they'll eat virtually any living prey they can swallow. Just keep the temps cool.



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Old 16th May 2005   #3 (permalink)
mattias
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Hi, I just obtained a couple (that is two specimens, sex unknown) and am looking for good captive care information.

Nate, haw you succeded in breeding them or know anyone that have? In an indoor facility I mean.

Cheers
Mattias



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Old 16th May 2005   #4 (permalink)
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Hi Mattias, congratulations on your find.

I have not bred them nor do I know of anyone who has. I really don't know of anyone who has ever kept them seriously though with proper temperatures, etc. I've kept a few individuals over the years, but never a sexed pair.



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Old 19th May 2005   #5 (permalink)
mattias
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The sad thing is that half an hour earlier someone bougth two other specimens, just before me...

In my 20 years of salamander-mania I never even have seen them. I will keep them in an aquaterrarium in a huge basement facility in southern Sweden. High temperatures will easily be avoided. The light totally artificial and of course the photoperiod too.

Exciting animals!
Mattias



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Old 20th May 2005   #6 (permalink)
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That would be frustrating. Good luck with them, the adults become very good captives. Hopefully you were lucky and got a pair. Do you know which subspecies they are?



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Old 20th May 2005   #7 (permalink)
mattias
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Thanks.
I haven´t got time to look into it. Only read about the subspecies briefly in Petranka and in the Auduborn societys (King?, Kemper?) book about N.A. species. And the old "Bible", but thats not in colour and uninspiering :-)

The books is not at the same place as the animals and I do not want them to get wet. I will check it out later.

They had no white markings at the side of their heads anyway.

They seem to prefer water before land in the setup, as mentioned by you in another thread.

Really, really nice creatures. I do not have so much exsperience with plethodontids before (only Plethodon and Eurycea), and these are so big to be lungless. Not like the image in my head of lungless. Of course I know there are even bigger lungless species, but the impulse image one get is wrong. Thats what is very exciting with the, but I get used I suppose. Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 20th May 2005   #8 (permalink)
mattias
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I am not much of a photographer I am afraid. The common is people come to me to take pictures.

In next week a guy is coming to get pictures of my collection of 17 species, maybe it will be in digital so I can show the specimens here.



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