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A. tigrinum mavortium breeding

This is a discussion on A. tigrinum mavortium breeding within the Tiger Salamander & Axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum, A. mavortium spp, etc.) forums, part of the Species, Genus & Family Discussions category; I read in Ed's caresheet for this species at Caudata Culture that "at this time, there are no substantiated reports ...

Tiger Salamander & Axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum, A. mavortium spp, etc.) The Tiger Salamanders and the Axolotl are so popular amongst hobbyists that they have been given their own topic. If you're particularly interested in the Axolotl, there is a large section of the forum devoted mainly to beginner Axolotl enthusiasts (not this topic).

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Old 12th November 2004   #1 (permalink)
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I read in Ed's caresheet for this species at Caudata Culture that "at this time, there are no substantiated reports of captive breeding for any terrestrial forms of A. tigrinum or A. mavortium."

Today I had a visit from Mr. Masai, of Japan, who has successfully bred A. tigrinum mavortium (WC to F1, F1 to F2). I received one of those larvae from him through a third party a couple of years ago (though I failed with it).

I've scanned the pics he showed me and will post them here in the coming days.

But please don't ask me for the details of how it was achieved as I simply don't have them (and I don't know much about Ambystoma to begin with!). This is something he's willing to document in greater detail (the next breeding round is in the spring) and share with us. But he'd prefer to present it as an article for Caudata.org magazine Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 12th November 2004   #2 (permalink)
jennifer
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That's quite a breakthrough, Tim! Tell Mr. Masai that MANY people are eagerly awaiting his article!



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Old 12th November 2004   #3 (permalink)
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Here's an F1 female laying its eggs:

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Old 12th November 2004   #4 (permalink)
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I'm sure he'll be happy to hear that Jen Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

By the way, should this be A. tigrinum mavortium or A. mavortium?



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Old 12th November 2004   #5 (permalink)
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i like the use of the notebook binder spine to fan out the plastic strips.



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Old 12th November 2004   #6 (permalink)
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I think the care sheet will need to be updated....
(and that care sheet was the effort of three people so I do not deserve all the credit, Jen and Nate had a lot to do with it.).
I am very interested in the details also as the methodology should apply to other Ambystomids.


Ed



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Old 12th November 2004   #7 (permalink)
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Yes!!

This makes my day...err...year. Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 12th November 2004   #8 (permalink)
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wow



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Old 12th November 2004   #9 (permalink)
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Nifty. Awesome, now all tiger keepers have hope.



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Old 13th November 2004   #10 (permalink)
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Paris, it's not a notebook binder but a heater cover.

Since this seems to be his original idea, it seems only fair to virtually patent it here as the "Masai method" or "Masai breeding nest" or something like that Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 13th November 2004   #11 (permalink)
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Tim, please tell Mr. Masai that I am greatly looking forward to it!



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Old 13th November 2004   #12 (permalink)
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I shall pass that along Click the image to open in full size.

Here is a pic showing the 700-800 (F1, I think) larvae, all from the same female:

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Old 13th November 2004   #13 (permalink)
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Wow, procreation at it's best. How many made it to morphing?



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Old 14th November 2004   #14 (permalink)
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Simply amazing. To be able to bred tigers is a major breakthrough for the survival of this endangered species. Hopefully, Mr. Masai's method will be compatible with other species of caudates, especially those whose survival is contingent on captivity.



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Old 14th November 2004   #15 (permalink)
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Ben, I don't recall. I think he said he has 40-50 F1. Or was it 40-50 F2?

Here is a pic of what I think is the F2 larvae:

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Old 14th November 2004   #16 (permalink)
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A close-up of the same:

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Old 14th November 2004   #17 (permalink)
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Tim, unless he's maturing tigers in a year, I am guessing those are from the same parents as before. If that's the case, the larvae aren't f2, they're also f1.

I'd give my right arm for some of them.



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Old 14th November 2004   #18 (permalink)
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Ah, but of course. I didn't consider that rather obvious fact Click the image to open in full size. I think it's probably better if I just post the pics and hold off the detailed narrative until I can confirm facts with him. To some extent, the dates shown on the pics speak for themselves.

Speaking of right arms (and left ones), here is a pic of the larvae with their hind limbs having developed:

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Old 14th November 2004   #19 (permalink)
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Old 14th November 2004   #20 (permalink)
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I find barred tigers to be simply beautiful. Please thank Mr. Masai for letting us see his tiger world ;).



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