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Cloudy water/ high nitrate

This is a discussion on Cloudy water/ high nitrate within the Newt and Salamander Help forums, part of the Beginner Newt, Salamander, Axolotl & Help Topics category; Hello, I have had a newt tank for almost 6 years now. Throughout the years I have had many things ...

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Old 23rd May 2006   #1 (permalink)
j
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Hello, I have had a newt tank for almost 6 years now. Throughout the years I have had many things in it. For the last 6 months my water has been cloudy and really high nitrate count. It has river rocks and pond stone as a base. no algae on the glass but the pond stone might have some (its hard to tell). All I have left in my tank is one (i think) chinese warty newt. I don't know how much longer he will live, I adopted him from a friend that was moving. I am using an Fluval 2 plus underwater filter and have done a million water changes and used Cycle, amquel. At this point i dont know what else to do. except contstant water changes including different types of filter media. PLEASE HELP ME I really want my water to be clean again and my newt (rusty) to be happy. I feed him live Blood/blackworms and have had a problem with them getting everywhere. I am about to change the tank to a huge bowl for food and slate and terracotta pots for land. no gravel for easier clean-up.



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Old 24th May 2006   #2 (permalink)
jennifer
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Are you also testing for ammonia and nitrITE? Are they OK? NitrATE is not really too dangerous, although it does indicate that there is too much decaying material there. I think if you clean up all leftover food, keep up with the water changes, and remove the gravel it will get better.



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Old 24th May 2006   #3 (permalink)
j
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Yes i tested the ph, nitrite, and ammonia. they have never been above normal. would taking out all the pondstone and only having big rocks and the feeding bowl be alright? thank you very much for responding!



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Old 24th May 2006   #4 (permalink)
jennifer
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Yes, I think that would be fine. I keep many aquatic tanks that are just bare on the bottom. It makes cleaning very easy.



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Old 25th May 2006   #5 (permalink)
j
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Thank you very much. I will try taking all the other stuff out. I will use slate (red and black) and a granite water dish designed for snakes and reptiles in the water for the live bloodworms. And teracotta pots for hiding and land. I dont know how i will be bale to arange it but i will try. Will this effect my biological filter? and should i use NOVaqua or Cycle to combat the cloudiness? or should i just keep doing water changes and treat the water with amquel? Again thank you very much for helping me this has been driving me nuts for months and none of the fish places around here know much about newts. which is why i am not really sure what type of newt he is or how long he is expected to live? thank you



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Old 26th May 2006   #6 (permalink)
jennifer
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If there is no excess ammonia, there is no point in adding Novaqua or Cycle or Amquel. Removing the gravel will take out some of your biofiltration, but if you have a filter and other porous surfaces established in the tank, it won't be a problem.

As for what kind of newt, warty newts are hard to identify. Most newts can live for many years (10-20). Look through the photos for the various Paramesotritons here:
http://www.caudata.org/cc/species/Salamandridae.shtml



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Old 10th June 2006   #7 (permalink)
j
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I am still struggling with the cloudy water after doing tons of water changes. I am about to re do the entire tank (slowly) with the teracotta pots how do i clean those before putting them in the tank? and with the rocks (probably slate) how do i clean those. And is there anywhere that sells prefabbed land and an easy way for the newt to get onto it? thank you for all your help. (i think the nitrates are finally coming down. Does high nitrate mean i have too high of a biofilter? thank you



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Old 10th June 2006   #8 (permalink)
ian
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SO gravel is no use for the tank? I always preferred to use gravel, thinking that it is good for the tank. Is gravel that bad?



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Old 10th June 2006   #9 (permalink)
edward
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snip "I am still struggling with the cloudy water after doing tons of water changes. I am about to re do the entire tank (slowly) with the teracotta pots how do i clean those before putting them in the tank? and with the rocks (probably slate) how do i clean those. And is there anywhere that sells prefabbed land and an easy way for the newt to get onto it? thank you for all your help. (i think the nitrates are finally coming down. Does high nitrate mean i have too high of a biofilter? thank you"endsnip

You can never have too much biofiltration, the problem with most caudates is usually do to too much current.

If the terracotta pots are new then simply scrub them with warm water (no soap) and let dry. If they have been used, then you may need to bleach them which will require soaking multiple rinses and a long air drying period.
The same for the rocks.

Continual cloudiness and high nitrates indicates a high bioload in the water. This is typically from overfeeding or not promptly removing all of the uneaten food from the tank.

Ian, Gravel is fine with respect to looks and biofiltration but it can be ingested resulting in impactions in the animals.

Ed



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Old 10th June 2006   #10 (permalink)
j
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Thank you for the advice. I am having a problem with the live blood/blackworms getting everywhere in the tank which is why i want to switch to using just slate and teracotta. i dont know an easy set up for the tank (50 gal. corner tank) to disperse the water flow and provide easy access to the land. I am going to cover the ground with big slate sheets and with the terracotta and the underwater filter will this be enough biofiltration? and my water has been a lil yellow lately (as well as still cloudy) any way of feeding them without causing more problems until i can change the tank over? thank you very much



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