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Mixing species??

This is a discussion on Mixing species?? within the Dendrobatids: Poison Arrow/Dart Frogs forums, part of the Anura: Frogs & Toads category; I already have a baby c.b. bumblebee dart frog, Could i get another c.b baby dart frog that is the ...

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Old 1st January 2012   #1 (permalink)
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Default Mixing species??

I already have a baby c.b. bumblebee dart frog, Could i get another c.b baby dart frog that is the same size but a different species?



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Old 1st January 2012   #2 (permalink)
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Default Re: Mixing species??

Probably, but it depends on the species. When mixing, you need to have much more precise questions and information. Animals should share climate, but occupy different microhabitats or have different diets. None should be generalists large enough to swallow cohabitants, although certain small aposematic species may be safe. If you have a diurnal terrestrial species, consider arboreal, fossorial, aquatic, or nocturnal terrestrial species. That way they use different parts of the environment, or use them at different times.

Keep in mind that in captivity we generally provide environments that are far too small. A terrestrial species in the wild may perch several feet up in bushes, which would put it higher than we even offer to a captive arboreal species. Larger cages are better in this respect.

Again, while diets may differ appreciably in the wild, the choices in captivity may not. Where diet is concerned, I would say that the old line of "they'll compete for food" is nonsense: Animals of the SAME species will compete far more than animals of different species, so just feed them enough, and offer at different times of day if need be.

Also keep in mind that animals which occur within a mile of each other in the wild may live in radically different climates. The frog from the mountain ridge may be cool and damp ALL the time, and may even experience snow, while the one a short distance downstream is living in hot and seasonal forest with a distinct dry season.

Last, there's the question of interbreeding, although this tends to go hand in hand with other concerns. Species are most likely to interbreed if they are closely related and are normally physically isolated from one another in the wild. Being isolated means they never have to decide whether a mate is suitable, so put them together and the physical barrier is gone.

On the other hand, in poison frogs, geographic isolation also tends to go with changes in reproductive methods, changes in size, and changes in climate and habitat. I wouldn't mix any Dendrobates, although D.leucomelas and D.tinctorius may occur together in the wild. You could probably mix some Dendrobates with some Oophaga, Ranitomeya, Andinobates, Ameerega, Allobates, or others. Personally, I would prefer to mix them only if they naturally occur together. For instance, Oophaga pumilio, Andinobates claudiae, and Dendrobates auratus probably occur together.

By comparison, Mantella expectata, Mantella betsileo, Mantella viridis, and Mantella ebenaui all occur in hot and fairly arid lowlands most of the time. Mantella aurantiaca, M.crocea, M.milotympanum, M.madagascariensis, M.baroni, and M.cowani normally occur in fairly cool and damp highlands - sometimes places where temperatures approach freezing at night. Despite being the same genus, they may not have similar habitats.

You'll have to evaluate your caging and the species you're considering. Personally, I never make recommendations out of the blue. It makes more sense to research what you're interested in, and then decide if it's appropriate; than it is to pick the "perfect" animal at random from 10000 species, and discover it's expensive, unkeepable, protected, or just not available.



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Old 2nd January 2012   #3 (permalink)
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Default Re: Mixing species??

I would probably be getting a dyeing dart frog or a blue and black dart frog. A 10 gallon terrarium.



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Old 2nd January 2012   #4 (permalink)
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Default Re: Mixing species??

Quote:
Originally Posted by frogman View Post
I already have a baby c.b. bumblebee dart frog, Could i get another c.b baby dart frog that is the same size but a different species?
I would really suggest against it. keep it in the same species and morph to avoid hybridization.

(if I read that correctly) especially in a 10 gallon. Different darts come from different places and have different needs behaviors etc. It really is like salamanders and newts they are all different and having a 10 gallon is not going to give them enough space to even try to give each other space if they wanted to. Enough space would be something huge, like maybe an entire room?

I would check out dendroboard for dart frog questions. Forum specifically for dart frogs like caudata is for salamanders and newts. Especially about mixing species, they will be able to tell you more and better than me. I'm still a n00b to darts but wouldn't dream of mixing them.

Edit:
Also the dyeing dart frog is a dendrobate tinctorius ( I'm getting a pair of these) where the bumble bee is a dendrobate Leucomelas. I know that the tinc females are very territorial and aggressive and will kill other females. Its just an example of some behavior that is not consistent across the 2 species another reason to avoid mixing them.

I'm almost sure that if you ask this on the dendroboard they will say if you really want 2 different frogs set up 2 different vivariums.



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Last edited by suztor; 2nd January 2012 at 05:34. Reason: extra info
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Old 4th September 2015   #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: Mixing species??

Quote:
Originally Posted by frogman View Post
I would probably be getting a dyeing dart frog or a blue and black dart frog. A 10 gallon terrarium.
I see dying frogs and salamanders kept at the wrong temperature in tiny boxes at the shows all the time, but I never buy them. If you mean that you want to know if you can put D. azures and D. tinctorus together, they are basically different color morphs of the same species(although scientist like to change classification systems back and forth) and will interbreed. You will get new offspring all throughout the year, but frog people won't want, even for free!



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