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chris
15th May 2006, 11:18
I received a female gallaica earlier this year. From the start she looked underweight and overly skittish & active. One eye has become watery and surrounded by mucus and the animal has recently started to make sneezing noises. Bubbles of mucus appear on the nostril. I have isolated her on paper twowels with some moss and a half-flowerpot. I put worms in, but don't know if she's eaten as she is very nervous.
I am worried that she will not fight this off on her own as it has been progressing since March. Any ideas for treatment. The only drug I have access to is Baytril.
Is this likely to be a disease which started in the eye, or did it spread there from repiratory system?

Chris

ian
17th May 2006, 11:51
Respiratory infections usually occur in amphibians from warmer climates which have been kept at too low a temperature,simply increasing the temp usually is enough to cure this.however in this case with fire salamanders this can't be the cause.It sounds like a respiratory infection with bubbles coming from the nostrils so a visit to the vet may be needed for a course of antibiotics.Also excessive water ingestion can cause this,how was she kept before you received her.

chris
17th May 2006, 13:36
Ian
I am not sure how she was kept, but the other owner had her for 5 years (reared from metamorph). I was thinking that maybe British weather was too cold for gallaica (from Portugal), but the male (which I believe to be w/c) is doing fine...

I don't have muchg confidence in my local exotics vet - he is a reptile man really, and can only deal with wounds in amphibians really.

Would soaking in a solution with baytril in help, or would direct application to the eyes and nose help?

If temperature is the porblem, hopefully the summer weather will help it recover.

Chris

ian
17th May 2006, 18:38
I don't think the British weather has anything to do with it.I had a fire salamander with a similar eye condition which cleared up on its own.Maybe stress is a factor,having been moved after five years having been there since a morph,stress can be a funny thing in animals as well as humans.I would (if a visit to the vets is not on)keep her separate as you are,try not to disturb her to much and hope she picks up.I can't comment on baytril as i am not familiar with it.I would keep trying her with food,Wax worms would be good to fatten her up should she start to eat.GOOD LUCK- Ian

chris
18th May 2006, 12:35
I've brought her inside to see if a slightly warmer climate helps her a bit. She seems a little more perky, coming to the front of her hide when I lift the lid off, as if hungry, but she doesn't really seem to notice waxworms etc. She looks a little fatter so she may have eaten an earthworm or two...the sneezing continues still, but her eyes look a little clearer. She is also walking more confidently (she seemed a little spindly/wobbly before).
I applied some baytril solution to the top of her head, which I'm hoping will be absorbed through the skin (I don't know whether this is feasible re molecule size etc). This may be purely coincidental with her slight improvement (or maybe I'm seeing what I want to see...), but I'll continue for a couple of days.
Chris

ian
18th May 2006, 13:41
Let me know how she gets on,heres hoping!

chris
24th May 2006, 09:41
Since she's been inside, her skin seems to have more lustre, she is less doddery and her eyes are less inflamed. THough the sneezing continues, its not so loud now and no mucus bubbles appear. She hasn't touvhed any waxworms I've put in, though, and its doubtful whether she's had any earthworms....she isn't looking skeletal yet, so hopefully she will start eating soon.
Chris

ian
24th May 2006, 12:06
Glad to hear she's improving.