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annette
3rd January 2003, 18:32
Hi:
Has anyone kept this type of toad-I am interested in temp/humidity and day/night temps?
I know they love to dig so was thinking of around 4 inches of soil in a 30 gallon tank for 3 of them(Same size)with a small shallow water dish and a few nicks and nacks like flat cork bark on rear of tank and some driftwood.Any info would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Annette

edward
5th January 2003, 14:56
Hi Annette,
I wouldn't keep the substrate that deep as you will never see them. (unless you are up in the middle of the night). They are not too fussy about temps, low to mid 70s F are fine for them. This species has a huge range and several subspecies so its hard to give you correct day night temps as this can vary with the subspecies. The ones I had lived for years at low 70s with a winter time drop into the high 60s. I didn't try to breed them but I understand that it isn't too difficult as they can be cycled fairly easily. If you keep the substrate moist then there should be sufficent humidity. Cork bark slabs are fine for sheltures for these guys. They are heavy feeders and will produce alot of waste so you may need to replace the substrate fairly often with this species.
If I think of anything else I'll post it here (or if you have any other questions).
Ed

annette
8th January 2003, 22:52
Thanks Ed.I would like to ask you if you have any males?I heard they are super loud callers.I bought the females.Your right they are big diggers but thats okay aslong as they are happy and yes big eaters they are.
I plan to remove and replace all the substrate every week.use the dirty soil in my garden under trees etc.
Thanks.
Annette

edward
8th January 2003, 23:16
Hi Annette,
I used to have all males (but this was about five years ago). Some of those males were over eight years old when they finally died. Unfortunately I'm not working with this species at this time.
Ed

annette
9th January 2003, 20:22
Hi Ed:
When you did have your males were they big callers,did they call only when misted?Thanks for all the help not many keep these toads.
Annette

edward
10th January 2003, 02:45
Hi Annette,
They normally didn't call unless they were misted although if the humidity was high they would call on occasion.
This species is an explosive breeder in much the same manner as spadefoot toads (but they don't seem to go through an estivation or hibernation period). If you keep them on the drier side for a couple of months and then put thme into a rain chamber you may be able to get them to breed for you.
How are you sexing them?
Ed

annette
11th January 2003, 19:08
Hi:
Ed,I dont really know how to sex them.I bought 3 big ones and one smaller one.The petstore guy said they were 1 male and 3 females.They live in my 30 gallon long.Its not a standard 30 long.
They are eating machines.They seem happy dug in most of the time come out here and there.I change the dirt once every 4 days instead of once aweek.I just buy giant non treated,fertilized,chemical soil.Its very cheap at local garden store and use that hey seem to be happy in it.I looked at their "fingers"to see if any difference,heard they can be sexed like that but no difference.
I have a bowl of water they arent into hat much.When i change their soil.I place them in a plastic topperware with 2 inches of warm aged water.
Annette

edward
13th January 2003, 02:27
Hi Annette,
What you have been trying to see are the nuptial pads. These normally do not develope until the frogs are actually in the breeding season (or are triggered in the case of explosive spawners). The problem with size sexing of animals is that you can usually only be sure of one sex as the smaller sex can also be an immature individual of the wrong sex. I don't remember off the top of my head if this species has a different colored throat patch where the vocal sac is located (a common indicator in many frogs and toads).
If the smaller one has a different colored throat then its likely that you have a male (but see qualifier above).
Placing the toads in a tub of water is unlikely to stimulate any real breeding response. When they are well acclimated try lowering the temperature 5-10 degrees and placing them into a rain chamber for several days. Ideally try it when a big storm is rolling in as the change in barometric pressure may be necessary. This may actually stimulate courtship and oviposition of the eggs.
Hope this helps,
Ed

annette
18th January 2003, 01:54
HI ED:
Thanks a million for all the great info/help you gave me.
Annette