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acer08
1st June 2008, 18:23
hi! im really worried about my axie :(...
his gills have turned completley white, ive had a search through the site and it seems like the answer is a salt bath? any ideas what could be causing this to happen??
thanks!!

gr33neyes
1st June 2008, 18:43
Acer have the actual gill fronds turned white or have they got a sort of white fluff on them?

digger
2nd June 2008, 06:43
I would try to post a pick before you do alt bath, it might jut be like my leucitic, when he become in active (normally after a meal whilst waiting to poo) he always turns a lot paler.
Is your a leucistic or other?

JPDeed
2nd June 2008, 10:26
The colour of an axolotl's gills is somewhat related to level of activity of the axolotl and the level of available oxygen present in the water (warmer water has less).

I think more information on the axolotl's behaviour and environment is needed to give more definitive assistance. For example:


Is the axolotl active or inactive?
Is the axolotl gulping air at the surface periodically?
Will the axolotl take food if offered?
Examining the gills, do the seem "alive" still - ie, can you still see thin red veins inside them?


In any circumstances, It would be advisable in this case to keep a close eye on the axolotl. If the gill colour change has occured suddenly, then it may revert back to blood-filled quickly too. Just as the human body tends to automatically guide blood to where it is needed most (eg, after eating, more blood goes to your digestive processes than say your arms or legs, and the reverse is true during physical activity), axolotls will most likely periodically have a differing amount of blood in their gill filaments. So don't panic :) Also, be careful about the amount of salt that goes into the water. Unfortunately while salt is highly useful for a number of illnesses, it must be remembered that it will not evaporate out of the tank with water, so how much you put in should be carefully monitored.

Therefore my primary recommendation, given what you have offered, is to

a) remain calm,
b) observe the axolotl for a while,
c) do a small water change (maybe 10%?) with dechlorinated water, and
d) watch the temperture. Maybe fill a plastic bottle with water and freeze it, then you can put the frozen bottle in the tank (closed of course) to cool it down.

Good luck, and post back if you have further information.

Jacquie
2nd June 2008, 10:58
Also, be careful about the amount of salt that goes into the water. Unfortunately while salt is highly useful for a number of illnesses, it must be remembered that it will not evaporate out of the tank with water, so how much you put in should be carefully monitored.

Salt treatment does not go into the tank!

Salt baths are given in a seperate container and are used to treat fungal and bacterial infections. 2-3 teaspoons of salt per one litre of fresh dechlorinated water, axolotl is placed in bath and left in for about 10 minutes - no longer than 15 minutes as salt will start to damage the axolotl in particular the gills.

Before subjecting the axolotl to a salt bath - be certain that it is fungus. If you could post a picture that would be of help.

Is there any cottony substance on the axolotl? If there is, please advise on your tank parameters (ammonia/nitrite/nitrate/PH and temperature) so we can ascertain what the problem may be that is causing fungus.

ianclick
2nd June 2008, 22:02
Hi Acer08, Im with Jacq.

Do not under any circumstances add any salt to your tank.

As JPDEED says the normal colour of an axolotls gills change, less active less colour, more active more colour.

Have a look at www.axolotl.org it has heaps of great advice about all things axolotl.