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View Full Version : Help with a filter..


kitkat
18th August 2009, 22:14
We have a Whisper 10i in one of our tanks but the speed is so high that it it sucks things into it- tails, gills, ec. There is no speed control, but I had heard there are ways to slow i down.. how can I do that?

Nathan
18th August 2009, 22:38
I'm not familiar with that filter model, but you can make it safer for your animals by taking a piece of filter sponge, piercing it with a knife, and then sliding it over the filter intake.

jclee
19th August 2009, 00:26
I couldn't tell from the pictures of that model, but does it have a dial that you can use to slow the intake? (Most whispers do, but I couldn't see one in the pics online.) I assume the problem is the output current as much as the intake? I couldn't even tell where the intake was on that model from the pictures I saw. Could you return it and exchange it for a filter that might be more suitable?

madFrankie
19th August 2009, 01:00
My experience with this type of internal filter is that they are almost always very enthusiatic in both intake and output.
If there's no speed control on it then you're definitely going to need to use a spraybar on the output (not sure if you're already using one?) as it's going to cause significant water flow otherwise which will stress your axolotls out and cause a whole host of stress-related problems.

Beyond what Nathan's already suggested for the intake problem, I'd be inclined to agree with jclee, replacement might be the best option.

External canister filters are the best choice for axolotl tanks. They are, however, considerably more expensive than the internal variety.

*EDIT* on having a better look at this model, I'm not so sure about the output issue... does it cause water-flow in there? Can't really tell what sort of output it has...

rnocera
21st August 2009, 20:08
I agree that replacement might be the best option. We use & sell those in the store I work in, and they're pretty much garbage. The pump inside it is 80 gph, and you can't control it. However, they do clog pretty fast, so once it's running for a little while, you'll have the exact opposite problem- not enough flow!

The only thing I can think of to slow it down is if you were to go buy a sheet of filter fiber, or quilt batting, cut a strip out of it, and tie it around the base of the filter where the water intake is. That might help a little.

Jennewt
22nd August 2009, 13:40
There are photos of this type of filter under "internal waterfall" on this page:
http://www.caudata.org/cc/articles/filters.shtml

I have several of the 10i filters and I like them, but I'm using them mostly for newt species that like a bit of current. In terms of producing a current, they are no worse than a hang-on-back type of waterfall filter, except that many HOB filters have a way to control flow, and the 10i does not.

This may be a totally impractical idea, but perhaps what you need is a larger tank, not a weaker filter. I would say that the 10i would be suitable for an axie tank of 30 gallons or more.

scrappa
23rd August 2009, 21:04
Hi,

I think you should put a spray bar onto your filter.

I have a fluval 105 with a spray bar on my 27gallon tank and this generates near to no current.

rnocera
26th August 2009, 14:56
Did you even bother reading the thread?