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Old 6th May 2009   #10
Ed
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Default Re: Where are the bright green orientalis?

The toads can modify thier green coloration due to many items including stress. If the toads are stressed for any reason, then they may be brown and there can be significant differences in "hue" depending on how the toad is experiencing the stress.
Feeding the crickets carotenoid containing foods may not have a big effect on the green coloration as this color is the result of blue light being reflected up through yellow pigmentation. In Bombina species, this yellow color is mainly due to pterins (which is why cb B. orientalis that have not been properly color supplemented have a yellow belly) but can also contain some beta carotene. Any food supplement that contains astaxanthin will work to color up the ventral areas as this is the pigment that is in some populations of brine shrimp. For example you could feed the crickets powdered krill and get the same result.

Ed
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