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Old 12th June 2016   #9
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Default Re: Metamorphed Axy...

Oh no, someone is wrong on the Internet!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kochebi View Post
This isn't technically correct. Mole Salamander is a broad term used for all salamanders of the ambystoma genus, including A. mexicanum (the axolotl), A. tigrinum (the tiger salamander), and a few others. While axolotls are still technically salamanders they are neotenic and no longer exhibit metamorphosis like tiger salamanders for example. Their bodies have generally stopped producing the chemical that induces metamorphsis in salamanders and they therefore never metamorphosis unless under extreme circumstances. So yes, there's the huge difference in that most mole salamanders metamorphose as a part of their life cycle but the metamorphosis of an axolotl is extremely stressful and usually shortens the animal's lifespan dramatically... if it even makes it through the process.
There's very little separating a facultatively neotenic population of tiger salamanders and the virtually obligate neoteny in the axolotl. Just an inflexibility in hormone levels in the axolotl. I believe Jake's original statement is correct.
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