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Fire-Belly & Sword-Tail Newts (Cynops & Hypselotriton)>Cynops orientalis 2011 mass production
newtboyuk 21:41 4th September 2011
Thanks for the information Tudor - very interesting! Did you use any livefoods at all in the early stages or were they on frozen from the moment they started eating?

 
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Jeroen Spobeck 22:44 4th September 2011
Originally Posted by newtboyuk:
Thanks for the information Tudor - very interesting! Did you use any livefoods at all in the early stages or were they on frozen from the moment they started eating?
I found that verry interessting two.

 
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anfibio 21:53 12th September 2011
I'm new in this forum, and it's very interesting, your CB H.Orientalis are amazings. Thanks for the information, I will have CB H.Orientalis soon.

 
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Tudor 13:54 13th September 2011
Originally Posted by newtboyuk:
Thanks for the information Tudor - very interesting! Did you use any livefoods at all in the early stages or were they on frozen from the moment they started eating?
The answer is no. For the very first moment I feed them with defrosted food.
I'm sorry for my late reply, but i saw your post just now.

 
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Kribby 12:53 16th September 2011
Originally Posted by Tudor:
The answer is no. For the very first moment I feed them with defrosted food.
I'm sorry for my late reply, but i saw your post just now.
Everything I have read has said that the efts would only eat live foods so I am happy to hear that you are having such great success with defrosted foods. I am attempting to raise some baby C. orientalis as well and all I can get locally is frozen foods and I was very worried that they would starve because of it.

You have made me a very happy person reading through your post.

 
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Tudor 19:00 16th September 2011
I'm glad to read that my post may help you :)

 
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Kribby 19:11 16th September 2011
Originally Posted by Tudor:
I'm glad to read that my post may help you :)
Then we are two glad people

I am thinking of giving your method of keeping the efts in an aquatic environment a try. I might split the groups and do one that way. Just to see if I can manage to have luck with it.

 
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Tudor 22:41 16th September 2011
I'm sure it will work fain. Just remember to ad a large "bush" of java moss and some Riccia fluitans. And pay atention to temperature. 19-20 Celsius at most.
The tank must have a good light system (daylight fluorescent tubes) in order to promote the growth of the moss and Riccia (also, a moss species :) )
You can also add some liquid nutrient for aquatic plants (such as Feropol by GBL or something similar).
Good luck!

 
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desertiguana 23:11 8th January 2012
I know this is late but I just wondering if the temperature has to be that low for that long of a time to induce breeding.

 
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Jesper 21:07 9th January 2012
No, this species does not need that low temps to breed. They generally breed at constant 20C if the conditions are good, however a period with lower temps is probably natural and likely to reinforce breeding behaviour once the temps go up.

 
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AngieD 22:26 9th January 2012
My sole larva is over 5 months old now, and has still not gone terrestrial, is this normal?

 
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SpaceCadetHayde 04:59 10th January 2012
Angie, its not unheard of. If the larvae is getting well-fed and being kept at low-temperatures it can hold off on morphing. Its not necessarily a bad thing either. Large larvae are generally easier to feed and care for than tiny terrestrial morphs.

 
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froggy 08:42 10th January 2012
Of the 11 larvae that I am rearing from last yearŽs breeding (not many in comparison, I know!), three went immediately terrestrial and are doing well on paper towels with moss and broken terracotta pot, fed on whiteworms, springtails and other bits and bobs, but the others seem to want to remain aquatic. They occasionally come onto the cork bark, but show no signs of becoming terrestrial. I made the misktake of putting two of the animals that had crawled onto the cork bark into a terrerstrial set up; one died and the other recovered after going back into the aquatic tannk. At least with mine, they donŽt do well being moved until the skin has gone completely hydrophobic.

I have them in a ŽlargeŽexo'terra standard faunarium, which is a solid mass of java and willow moss, with a small piece of cork bark that barely breaks the surface. The temperature is very constant, with an air temp of 17C diurnally and 15C nocturnally.

How are your group doing, Tudor?

C

 
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AngieD 19:16 10th January 2012
Thanks Chris and Hayden, you've put my mind at rest. I make sure there's plenty of daphnia in the tub for him, and my room is kept quite cold (mainly for the paddle-tails). Knowing that keeping them well-fed and cold can delay metamorphosing is a relief. Our adult only laid about 3 eggs (to our knowledge) and 2 died after about a week, so naturally I worry about this one survivor, it's the first larva I have ever looked after

 
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mroblivion1 10:55 16th March 2012
Wow! This has been soo helpful to me! My breeding pair gave me a total of 9 eggs but 2 weeks ago. One of them hatched last night, then I found another 2 eggs!!
Temperature of the tank is 19 degrees constant.
The eggs are in a kitchen mixing bowl (About 2-3 litres).

I have a few questions as i am still learning about the C. Orientalis species:

Will the larvae need separating from the other eggs into another bowl, and would they need lots of plants? I have a large amount of hornwort that i use with my breeding pair and my aquariums, since it doubles in size every week from even low lighting.

Would the larvae need some way of getting out of the water, or will they want to in the next week or so as soon as they start metamorphosis?

I keep my water levels about 2-3" of water, so that they can climb up the side of the tank for air. Is this the right method or can i use a lot of hornwort plant for them to climb on for air?

Thanks :)

 
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Bambu 21:28 26th March 2012
I'm impressed. Congratulations! a great job :)

 
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