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Plethodontids and Lungless Salamanders (Bolitoglossa, Eurycea, Plethodon, etc.) The largest, and one of the most diverse groups of salamanders, these salamanders have all evolved to breathe solely through their skin and are found almost exclusively in North America.

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Old 26th February 2018   #1
ntny
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Default Eurycea guttolineata terrestrial or semi-aquatic?

Hi folks,

may i check if Eurycea guttolineata are terrestrial or semi-aquatic?
i read on several sources on internet and it seems they are more terrestrial.
may i know if i can setup them like eurycea cirrigera habitat?
by the way are they also arboreal?
thanks



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Old 26th February 2018   #2
Cloppy
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Default Re: Eurycea guttolineata terrestrial or semi-aquatic?

I have kept one of those before, But I got from a creek, so it was already aquatic. Mine was not arboreal. Best way to find out a they prefer to be aquatic or terestrial is to set them up in both habitats and see which habitat it will eat in.



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Old 27th February 2018   #3
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Default Re: Eurycea guttolineata terrestrial or semi-aquatic?

hi Cloppy
thanks for advice.
glad to know they can be aquatic or semi-aquatic. which is easier for me to cool them down..
what temperature are you keeping them on the average?
i keep my marble sallies at a constant 22-23C. is this temp ok for them or too high?
thanks mate



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Old 5th March 2018   #4
taherman
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Default Re: Eurycea guttolineata terrestrial or semi-aquatic?

They are semi-aquatic. During the active season they are more terrestrial and most feeding by adults takes place on land. I've noticed they spend quite a bit more time in the water in winter, and females oviposit under submerged cover object.



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Old 5th March 2018   #5
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Default Re: Eurycea guttolineata terrestrial or semi-aquatic?

Hi folks,
thanks for your advice and information
i read up them on https://amphibiaweb.org , they seems can be found in north of florida area
may i know if a temperature of 22-24C is too high to keep them?
i read they are lungless salamander family and i am not too sure if they need cooler temps to survive...
how about Eurycea longicauda? they are also very beautiful species.
thanks



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Old 11th March 2018   #6
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Default Re: Eurycea guttolineata terrestrial or semi-aquatic?

Hello Taherman,

thanks for advice
i read that Eurycea guttolineata is found in north of florida.
while Eurycea longicauda seems to be only found further north and absent in florida
https://amphibiaweb.org/cgi/amphib_q...account=lannoo
i assume Eurycea longicauda will need cooler temp?
i am really interested in either one of these 2 beautiful species above.
can you advice if temperature of 22-24C is ok to house them properly? i am using a aquarium chiller to cool down to provide at stable temp 22-24C for them. while i also intend to breed them by keeping them in a fridge for a few months
currently i am keep A.opacum this way
thanks and cheers!


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Originally Posted by taherman View Post
They are semi-aquatic. During the active season they are more terrestrial and most feeding by adults takes place on land. I've noticed they spend quite a bit more time in the water in winter, and females oviposit under submerged cover object.



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Old 18th March 2018   #7
ntny
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Default Re: Eurycea guttolineata terrestrial or semi-aquatic?

Hi Folks,
need some advice on Eurycea guttolineata
i read up Eurycea guttolineata on amphibiaweb.org, the website recommends a temperature of 5-18C. may i know if anyone has managed to keep at them at a higher temp 22C and breed them?
i am really interested in this species as they seems to be very interesting and different from other woodland species. i am also interested in E. longicauda but it seems E. longicauda comes from further north and should need even cooler temps.
thanks

https://amphibiaweb.org/cgi/amphib_q...raffaelli&gaa=

Author: Jean RaffaŽlli
Eurycea (Eurycea) guttolineata (Holbrook, 1838)
Eurycea with three bands
There is no known hybridization with E. longicauda , of which it was formerly a subspecies, in the areas where the two species coexist south of the Appalachians, but the presence of intermediate-stained individuals has been reported. 20 cm. 13-14 costal furrows. The tail reaches 65% of the total length in the adult, it is much shorter in the larva and the young as in E. longicauda. A black band on the middle of the back bordered by a yellow to yellow-brown zone, this zone being bordered in turn by a large black dorsolateral band. This last band is bordered on the flanks of a white zone. Vertical bars on the tail sometimes merged to form a zigzag band. The three characteristic bands of the adult appear in the larva aged 1 to 2 months. It reaches a large size before metamorphosis, which occurs before one year in general. Underparts mottled with white and black gray. Prominent cirri, papillae on the cloaca of the male, elongated maxillary teeth in the male during the breeding season. The cirri are present in the female, but less pronounced.

* Wet environment along rocky or silted streams generally within 800 m, up to 1,000 m in the southern Appalachians, roadside ditches, small streams, east of the E. longicauda (eastern half of Virginia, Carolinas, Georgia, northwestern Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, far eastern Louisiana and northwestern Kentucky), to the Atlantic coastal plain and the Gulf of Mexico. In the coastal plain, often under the bark in the immediate edge of the water in flooded forests and cypress areas. Shelters under stones, in crayfish burrows, under bark and plant debris. LC. Many populations destroyed by deforestation. Bridal games in autumn and early spring, as at longicauda. Up to 100 eggs laid in series of 8 to 14 eggs deposited singly on stones and plant debris in the water, usually not far from the surface, in the current (pers. Spawning in the wild often takes place in December.

Aquaterrarium as for E. l. longicauda, ​​at temperatures between 5 and 18 į C. Seems more territorial. AT +.

QUOTE=taherman;485052]They are semi-aquatic. During the active season they are more terrestrial and most feeding by adults takes place on land. I've noticed they spend quite a bit more time in the water in winter, and females oviposit under submerged cover object.[/QUOTE]



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