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Tree Frogs Tree frogs of all kinds should be discussed here.

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Old 17th July 2004   #1
meghan
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Here's a picture of one of my spring peepers and of one I haven't figured out what it is yet (and yet I've had it for over a year...)
Click the image to open in full size.



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Old 17th July 2004   #2
mark
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which one is it? the one in the corner or the one on the leaf?
also is the one in the corner a tree frog. or a ground frog trying to escape.



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Old 17th July 2004   #3
meghan
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The brown frog is a spring peeper. Tell tale marks are the "X" on it's back. Not trying to escape at all. That's what they look like when they anchor themselves to the glass or a branch. They'll stay like that all day. They tuck themselves in a corner or crease.



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Old 17th July 2004   #4
nesaraj
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You mix species? Not a good idea...



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Old 18th July 2004   #5
mark
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the other frog is a grey treefrog.(hyla veriscolour) isn't it??
not sure.mark jacobs



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Old 18th July 2004   #6
nesaraj
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Yes, the other frog does indeed look like one of the two grey treefrog species (H. Versicolour or H. Chrysoscelis). Grey treefrogs have one of the higest abilities for colour changes amongst tree frogs, so it is not surprising to find a green one.



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Old 19th July 2004   #7
mark
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you can mix species along as they are from the same region. it happens in the wild so? why not?



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Old 19th July 2004   #8
nesaraj
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Yes you can mix species from the same region. However, in captivity, one has a closed ecological system, and this facilitates the transfer of pathogens between species.



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Old 19th July 2004   #9
mark
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ahh very true and also it allows any parasites that may not normally be transferred between species transfer quite rapidly to quickly cause a major problem.
although it does look very nice when species are mixed. and it often looks A LOT nicer when you do and if they have a natural setup.



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Old 19th July 2004   #10
chris
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Then again, lions and gazelle are found in the the same habitat, but you wouldn't mix them in captivity (extreme example I know, but you could easily get at least get injuries from mixing frog species)
Chris



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Old 19th July 2004   #11
peter
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The frog looks to be an Eastern Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor). There's a chance that it's a Cope's Gray treefrog (hyla chrysoscelis), but it appears to have a white spot under its eyes, which is a give-away.



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Old 20th July 2004   #12
mark
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i thought the only way of telling the difference between the two species was genetic testing. or something like that. but if it is also that way it makes it a hell of a lot easier.



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Old 20th July 2004   #13
nesaraj
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One of the ways to tell the difference between the 2 grey treefrog species is their call.



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Old 20th July 2004   #14
peter
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Another thing that can be used is that Cope's will lose their mottling on their back after the breeding season, or when it's warm, and will typically be a solid lime green. But the best indication is the white spot, or the breeding call.



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Old 26th July 2004   #15
mark
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yeah as i was saying earlier dna testing is really the only 100% to be sure what type it is.
and using the call is a good way but you have only got one of the gray treefrogs so it may be very hard to test it with others though i suppose you could download a call of the internet



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Old 26th July 2004   #16
nesaraj
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General Info:
mtRNA (mitochondrial ribonucleic acid) analysis is what is performed to identify species, not DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) analysis.



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Old 26th July 2004   #17
nesaraj
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Here is a general website for those who are interested in the process:

http://www.largocanyon.org/science/Mtdna/mitoch.htm



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Old 28th July 2004   #18
meghan
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I have 2 common grey tree frogs in a separate tank and this particular green frog here hasn't grown OR changed color at all, like my common greys do, the entire year I've had it. I don't think it's a common grey tree frog. I'll have to get some better pictures and maybe someone would be able to identify it by that. The one I provided is blurry. I haven't heard any calls from it either. My commons keep me up nights at times!
By the way, this green one was found in the same area I found the spring peepers. I understand it's debatable on mixing species but I also think it's not really harming much (minus the parasite issue, that I agree with) with this particular arrangement. I would never put small frogs in with large ones. That's why I was keeping this small green one with the peepers and the tank I have them in is pretty large. Once I can convince my husband to build me my own critter room/greenhouse, I'll get a separate tank for it.



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Old 28th July 2004   #19
meghan
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Click the image to open in full size. Thanks Mike! I need to reword what I said. I meant it a different way. My brain is mush at night after a long day with 3 kids!



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