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Fire-Belly & Sword-Tail Newts (Cynops & Hypselotriton) Perhaps the most famous and frequently bred newts in captivity, the fire-bellied newts and sword-tail newts are well known throughout the world as being excellent, gregarious captives.


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Old 27th October 2004   #41
john
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I'm horribly jealous!



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Old 29th October 2004   #42
Tim Johnson
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Chris, if I didn't give the plants sufficient light, they'd rot and die, but I do, and most tend to last until I start skimping on the light (though the Egeria densa were weak to begin with and you can see some dead leaves on the bottom of the tank from another plant). In one of my tanks fitted with a special plant light, the plants thrive despite there being no rooting substrate. Maybe there are other factors involved. In some tanks they do well, and others not so well. I don't know a thing about plants, by the way. Maybe we could continue this in another thread... Click the image to open in full size.

John, this is only going to hurt for a sec':

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Old 29th October 2004   #43
Tim Johnson
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I really don't get it though. I've provided these critters with at least five kinds of plants as potential oviposition sites, but what do they choose? A 2-inch plastic strip that just happened to find its way into the tank Click the image to open in full size.

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Old 29th October 2004   #44
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Removed for safekeeping!

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Old 29th October 2004   #45
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Tim,
By the way do you know what type of Utricularia you are growing in the tank? If it was here in the USA I would suspect U. gibba but I have no clue what is available in your locale.

Ed



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Old 31st October 2004   #46
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Whatever it is it might snack on any extra BBS or daphnia in the tank if thats fine with you.

Ed: U gibba is annoying in planted tanks-but I remember someone said it is worse than hair algae. Now in the middle of a hair algae infestation...I would take U. gibba attack over it any day!



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Old 1st November 2004   #47
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Sorry but I don't know a thing about plants and had no idea I have a carnivorous plant in my tank. Might this pose some sort of danger?



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Old 2nd November 2004   #48
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It is possible as some Utrics are known to capture fish larva and digest them.

Ed



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Old 3rd November 2004   #49
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Ed: I think this one is too small for that. Some people claim U. vulgaris can easily down full grown mosquito larvae though!



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Old 13th November 2004   #50
Tim Johnson
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In this pic, you can actually see her exerting pressure to expel the egg:

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Old 13th November 2004   #51
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The female newt always look like they're so exausted when they're laying eggs. They squint like they're in a lot of pain.



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Old 13th November 2004   #52
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Ben: My Tylototriton verrucosus will beg me for food while grasping plants and placing an egg. Does that mean they're in a lot of pain? :P



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Old 13th November 2004   #53
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Well I was just basing my comment on observations of smooth newts in my pond, my own C. oreintalis, and about one million pictures in books. All the newts I've seen lay eggs have been ones that lay their eggs over a period of several weeks, I've never viewed a newt that was an explosive layer, like your verrucosus. I suppose I was a bit over assumptive while I made the comment "always".



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