The longest running Amphibian Community on the Internet.

Tags Register FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Caudata.org Store

Notices

General Discussion & News from Members Post won't fit elsewhere? Post here! This is also the ideal place for your own news, information on books, amphibians in the media, and off-topic posts.

Reply

 

Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 21st March 2006   #1
tyler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

I'm sure that this was once a topic in the past and I'm not trying to start any wars; I'm just trying to get the pros and cons of owning a terrestrial species and an aquatic species.



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #2
joan
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

My opinion:

Aquatic species more active than terrestrial. Easier to see. Terrestrial species don't live in water, so you don't need to worry about water quality and cycling. They tend to be fossorial, so you don't see them as much.

Both are great to have!



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #3
tyler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

Is there any possible way that I can get an active and outgoing species that doesn't involve worrying about water quality and cycling? lol doubt it thanks for your post anyways Joan.



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #4
Alison Brown
(ali)
Prolific Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Nationality:
Age: 33
Posts: 579
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: ali has started on the right path
Default

Don't be too intimidated about water quality (don't ignore it either). All I did was set up my tank about a month in advance (longer is maybe better?) then put my little newties in. I clean the gravel about once every 2-3 weeks and everything goes fine with my filter and all.



ali is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #5
garrison
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

If anything, at least for me, cycling an aquarium 1 month prior to getting my new acquisition gives me time to get more excited about it and really accomplish some research before I get the animal. This allows me to really be prepared for introduction etc.



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #6
joseph
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

With terrestrial sals you have to be concerned about moisture levels. It seems and is much easier to me to just keep them totally wet.



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #7
tyler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

Is it more expensive to do the water way? In a sense I would like to get a newt because it wouldn't be buried all the time. I'm just as Ali said "intimidated" by it all: all those pumps, filters, and gadgets.



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #8
william
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

you don't need any of the gadgets as long as you can ensure that you can keep the water quality at an optimum level. especially for some of the easier species. i don't use any "gadgets" for my newt tanks.



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #9
abrahm
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

Depending on the newt species all that you would really need as far as a filter goes is a sponge filter which sell for around 20 dollars total.

These filters should provide plenty of surface area for beneficial bacteria, require almost zero maintenance and keep the water well oxygenated. They don't do much for mechanical filtration but in my opinion that's really not necessary if you watch your water parameters and do partial water changes.



  Reply With Quote
Old 21st March 2006   #10
jennifer
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Gallery Images:
Comments:
Default

I think it really comes down to personal preference. Maintaining water is a hassle in some ways, but changing out dirty soil from a terrestrial setup is a hassle in other ways.



  Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
aquatic, species, terrestrial


(View-All Members who have read this thread : 12 (Set)

Biscuit Oliva, cfaas, L Keeper, Ltdanicecream, Peyote, Rayliberty, SeerHawk, shinobido, slater, tigmades, Tim Robin, whiteblaze11
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads

Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New species of Salamander found among find of over 1,000 species tmarmoratus Press / News Items 6 17th December 2008 14:45
Cycling a terrestrial setup? and a teeny bit of species mixing. tyler Newt and Salamander Help 3 4th December 2006 22:34
Semi-aquatic vs. terrestrial... kate General Discussion 16 14th June 2006 01:44
Terrestrial/aquatic tails kaysie Eurasian Newts (Triturus, former Triturus, Calotriton & Euproctus).. 0 18th August 2004 01:47


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:49.