The longest running Amphibian Community on the Internet.

Tags Register FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Caudata.org Store

Notices

Off-Topic Many people have requested an area of the forum in which to discuss topics not directly related to the rest of the forum (such as newt and salamander art).

Reply

 

Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 29th November 2013   #1
findi
Herpetologist & Author
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Nationality:
Posts: 400
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)
Default New Studies on Reptile Intelligence: How Smart is Your Pet?

Hi, Frank Indiviglio here. I’m a herpetologist, zoologist, and book author, recently retired from a career of over 20 years with the Bronx Zoo. A key indicator of intelligence is said to be behavioral flexibility – the ability to modify actions to fit new situations. Long thought to rely mainly upon instinct, reptiles have not been credited with much “brain power”. However, recent research revealed that many reptiles are capable of solving complex problems that are not “covered” by instinct, and can use what they’ve learned in the future (see NY Times; Nov. 18, 2013). Although reptiles diverged from warm blooded creatures at least 280 million years ago, some meet or even exceed the problem-solving abilities of birds and mammals. This will not surprise reptile owners, of course!
I’m often amazed by what I observe among the reptiles under my care, and would like to summarize some of that, and several interesting experiments, here. I hope you will post your own experiences below. This is a new area of research, so please feel free to boast, and remember that each new observation, however fleeting, has value.
Read the rest of this article here New Studies on Reptile Intelligence - How Smart is Your Pet?

Please also check out my posts on Twitter http://bitly.com/JP27Nj and Facebook http://on.fb.me/KckP1m

My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with: That Pet Place welcomes Zoologist/Herpetologist Frank Indiviglio to That Reptile Blog | That Reptile Blog

Best Regards, Frank Indiviglio



findi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th November 2013   #2
Seth
(sde)
Field Herper
 
sde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Age: 19
Posts: 1,889
Gallery Images: 27
Comments: 14
Rep: sde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.org
Default Re: New Studies on Reptile Intelligence: How Smart is Your Pet?

Hi Frank! ( I want to be a herpetologist when I grow up by the way, so its cool to have one on here ).

So, the other day I was feeding my newts, and, like usual, my male came out first to eat, but then my female started coming out. She then proceeded to step on his head, which in turn discouraged him from feeding much.

Now I know that newts aren't reptiles but I decided to share anyhow.

Now, I am thinking maybe that she stepped on his head because she knew that that would happen. Is this a possibility? -Seth



__________________
I keep Ambystoma, Cynops, Taricha, Tylototriton, Salamandra, Ensatina, and Dicamptodon. Always interested in more Tylototriton or Taricha.
sde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd December 2013   #3
findi
Herpetologist & Author
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Nationality:
Posts: 400
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)
Default Re: New Studies on Reptile Intelligence: How Smart is Your Pet?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sde View Post
Hi Frank! ( I want to be a herpetologist when I grow up by the way, so its cool to have one on here ).

So, the other day I was feeding my newts, and, like usual, my male came out first to eat, but then my female started coming out. She then proceeded to step on his head, which in turn discouraged him from feeding much.

Now I know that newts aren't reptiles but I decided to share anyhow.

Now, I am thinking maybe that she stepped on his head because she knew that that would happen. Is this a possibility? -Seth
Hi Seth,

Newt/salamander behavior is more complicated than we realized in the past...red backed salamanders stake out and mark specific territories, Cal newts can return to home pond when displaced by miles, etc/. They definitely interact, compete, etc, so you suggestion could very well be true. Glad to hear you are interested in a career in this field - take notes on what you see, record your ideas, theories, no matter how far-fetched they may seem (who could imagine we'd find bark-eating tadpoles in trees, for example!). We know less aout salamanders than any other herp group, much to be learned.

Let me know if you need career info as time goes on; the following articles are on herpetology careers, volunteering - there are many other otpions, routes to tske, these are just some ideas:
The 10 Best Ways to Prepare for a Career in Herpetology - Part 1

The 10 Best Ways to Prepare for a Career in Herpetology - Part 2

Reptile and Amphibian Conservation: Volunteer Opportunities Involving Field Research

Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles

Enjoy, Frank



findi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd December 2013   #4
Seth
(sde)
Field Herper
 
sde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Age: 19
Posts: 1,889
Gallery Images: 27
Comments: 14
Rep: sde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.org
Default Re: New Studies on Reptile Intelligence: How Smart is Your Pet?

Thanks Frank! Never would have thought that there would be bark eating tadpoles!

Salamanders are what I like best, newts actually. I am learning fast.....I think. Thanks again! -Seth



__________________
I keep Ambystoma, Cynops, Taricha, Tylototriton, Salamandra, Ensatina, and Dicamptodon. Always interested in more Tylototriton or Taricha.
sde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd December 2013   #5
findi
Herpetologist & Author
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Nationality:
Posts: 400
Gallery Images: 0
Comments: 0
Rep: findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)findi has maxed out Caudata.org's Reputation System (we are not worthy!)
Default Re: New Studies on Reptile Intelligence: How Smart is Your Pet?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sde View Post
Thanks Frank! Never would have thought that there would be bark eating tadpoles!

Salamanders are what I like best, newts actually. I am learning fast.....I think. Thanks again! -Seth


Your state has some interesting species; ...I still recall the first pacific giant Salamander I came across...amazing. If you click on categories here you'll reach newt and salamander articles...but function is not great, others get mixed in. I can send links if there's something you cannot find. Any of your observations, questions welcomed on any article. I've written a Newt/Sal book for Barron's...1st edition was better than second, re newts, but editorial guidelines changed. Not sure if 1st is still available, but it went into career prep., my observations a bit.

Enjoy, Frank



findi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2nd December 2013   #6
Seth
(sde)
Field Herper
 
sde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Nationality:
Location: [ Members Only ]
Age: 19
Posts: 1,889
Gallery Images: 27
Comments: 14
Rep: sde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.orgsde is a mainstay of Caudata.org
Default Re: New Studies on Reptile Intelligence: How Smart is Your Pet?

Thanks again Frank!

I too remember the first time I found a pacific giant, a little female, 51/2 inches. I was so excited! I am most interested in Taricha Granulosa, however I like all Amphibians.



__________________
I keep Ambystoma, Cynops, Taricha, Tylototriton, Salamandra, Ensatina, and Dicamptodon. Always interested in more Tylototriton or Taricha.
sde is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
intelligence

Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads

Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Question: Axolotl intelligence bmp1976 Axolotl General Discussion 10 3rd May 2016 06:24
Axolotl Intelligence Cruor Other Scientific Studies 2 22nd August 2014 22:52
Amphibian Intelligence - what do you think? findi General Discussion and Identification 0 23rd September 2012 21:00
Axolotl intelligence Star Axolotl General Discussion 9 26th May 2011 08:01
Okay so i never said i was smart lol AmandaLyne Axolotl tank set-ups, filters, substrate 2 1st December 2009 19:27


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:25.