• For Sale/Give-Away/Trade Ads for all countries

    Caudata.org was founded to encourage and help people breed newts and salamanders in captivity. As a result we feel very strongly about the sale of wild-caught animals and we do not allow this practice. All for sale advertisements must be for captive bred animals. Animals that are wild-caught but are "long-term" captives can be given away. We may allow long-term captive animals to be traded, strictly at the moderators' discretion (if you have a track record/we know of you and your practices, we are more likely to approve such an advertisement).

    Commercial sellers will only be allowed to advertise on Caudata.org if they sell captive bred animals only and we also ask that you don't link your website (or any other commercial website) unless you are a captive-bred only establishment. As a commercial seller, if you do not think you meet the criteria but are unsure, please contact us.

    For everyone, private or commercial, the general criteria for approving ads are as follows:

    For Sale or Trade (amphibians):

    - Captive Bred (CB) only (must say so).
    - Must state quantity of animals available.
    - Must state age or source of animals (did you breed them or buy them?).
    - Must state price.
    - No protected species unless you can provide permits or legal papers where such things apply.
    - Must be for animals currently available (not orders for future animals).


    Free to good home:

    - Captive Bred (CB) or Long-Term Captive (LTC).
    - A history of the animals would be helpful.
    - No protected species unless you can provide permits or legal papers where such things apply.


    For Sale or trade (supplies, feeders, etc.):

    - Anything goes, within reason.


    Ads are often placed without the complete info above. This will delay the approval of your ad by the moderators, or it could result in it being removed completely.

    Users who have not complied with our forum rules (linked at the bottom of every page) will not have their ads approved. We pay special attention to whether or not you have filled the real name field and whether your country flag is listed in your profile. Also, if you have any unresolved warning or infraction, your ad will not be approved.

    Thanks to Abrahm and Jennewt for writing most of this.
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General chit-chat
Help Users
  • Toothpickthelotl:
    She looks fine in appearance but she has been acting very lethargic and not eating unless I drop it right infront of her face
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  • Nioa:
    @Toothpickthelotl, Ah, that tank size seems adequate. I've got no clue.
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  • Toothpickthelotl:
    What’s even weirder is I have a few live plants in the tank which I thought absorb nitrates. I’m wondering if maybe there’s some dead plant matter or something?
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  • Nioa:
    Oh, that could do it! The only time my nitrates got a bit high in my fbt tank is when there was a big mass of dead plant matter
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  • Michaelmiskimm167:
    Anyone have any useful links on raising newt larva/efts? Just picked up my first and have been doing a lot of research but can never do too much, Chinese fire bellied newts specifically
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  • maddyb9903:
    Hello all! I posted a thread in the axolotl sick category and have gotten no responses yet but i’m kinda worried...i’m definitely paranoid to say the least? Could anyone help? Curved gills i think?! but it’s been very active today and eating, no curved tail and water & temp seem to be right...help :(
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  • maddyb9903:
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  • maddyb9903:
    my thread^
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  • Sefagula:
    Some axolotls just have gills that naturally curl. If you're really worried, get an API test kit and retest your water. Strips are sometimes not the most accurate
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  • Chat Bot:
    leomleite has joined the room.
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  • maddyb9903:
    @Sefagula, Thank you! I will be doing that as soon as I can!
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  • Nioa:
    @Michaelmiskimm167, Hey me too! same species
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  • Toothpickthelotl:
    Hi again guys! So my axie is currently in a tub and I did a large water change and my nitrates are still super high!! It looks like they maybe went down like 10 ppm. I am so confused and concerned. Should I be waiting until tomorrow to test the water again? Do I need like time after a water change to get accurate readings?
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  • Toothpickthelotl:
    I don’t understand what could be going on. There is no dying plant matter and I siphoned the sand and got as gunk much as I possibly could out of it. Could it maybe be the filter or something?
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  • Sefagula:
    What is the nitrate reading? Nitrates are fine to have in limited quantities, 5-15 ppm. The presence of nitrates suggests that your tank is cycled or atleast somewhat cycled. Check nitrites and ammonia since those will be the ones that will harm your axolotl the most.
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  • Sefagula:
    If you want your filter to be more effective, you can add some additional filter media such as bio balls or a foam sponge to increase the surface area that beneficial bacteria can reside on. I'm not sure what type of filter you use but canister filters and certain HOB filters such as the aquaclear have additional compartments for filter media.
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  • Toothpickthelotl:
    @Sefagula, hi! I mentioned the nitrate level higher up in the chat, I’m realizing I should of stated it again for anyone new. My nitrates were reading above 80 ppm out of the blue. The other day when I checked they were at 10. It makes no sense. Nitrites and ammonia are 0. So strange right?
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  • Toothpickthelotl:
    Im going to keep doing water changes until I can keep the nitrates below 20. I have my axie in a tub with dechlorinated water and will change the water daily until I can get her back in the tank. She started acting funky a few days back after I did a water change, barely eating and lethargic. She seems to be doing better in the tub
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  • Sefagula:
    80 ppm is extremely high and will definitely be harmful to your axolotl. I would strongly recommend getting the API freshwater test kit to get an accurate recording of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate.
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  • Sefagula:
    Also, since your axolotl is in a tub, you don't need to do as many water changes to your original tank. If you do too many water changes, it will stall the cycle and take longer for beneficial bacteria to build up
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  • Toothpickthelotl:
    don’t worry, I have the kit. Ammonia and nitrite are reading 0. I was shocked to see the nitrate so high, especially with no ammonia. It makes no sense and is really confusing me
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  • Toothpickthelotl:
    okay, how often should I do water changes while she’s in the tub? Do u have any advice for getting the nitrates down?
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  • Sefagula:
    Water changes are really your best bet for getting nitrates down. I would do 25-30% every week since you're doing fishless cycling and you don't have to worry about anything being harmed
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  • Sefagula:
    My bad I keep saying to get the API test kit. I keep thinking I'm talking to different people
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  • Sefagula:
    Ammonia and nitrites should be at zero or close to zero. A cycled tank means that there's really only the presence of nitrates. However you do have too much. Try another 30-40% water change and see what the nitrate levels are.
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    Sefagula: Ammonia and nitrites should be at zero or close to zero. A cycled tank means that there's really... +1
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