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1700 gallon stingray river

Syllvie

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Whoa. That is... unbelievably amazing. I am so jealous. That must've cost a fortune!
 

punctata

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I keep about 8-10 pdf's in the system. Some Aurautus,leucs and tincs. I don't worry about breeding as their is no hope for Tads to develop with the stingrays present.


I think you are wrong about no breeding going to happen. Some of the tads will survive. The Parents will also transport them around to new plants or "pool" cites. Nice tank tho.
 

asfouts

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Please, and this applies to the great many people in the hobby who speak English, look up the definition of "tropical", because you are wrong. "Tropical" is a latitude, not a climate or environment. Anywhere in Central America is, by definition, tropical, regardless of whether it is desert, coral reef, swamp, or glacier. Widespread misuse of the term does not change its correct definition.

Regards to your definition here. That is only one use of the word tropical... It also has another definition being... "of, being, or characteristic of a region or climate that is frost-free with temperatures high enough to support year-round plant growth given sufficient moisture " this is in every dictionary I have came across in one form or another, even old leather-bounds.

if we are to go into uses of words here, we often categorize misuse of a word as not being the normal use of the word. such as pardon it but, "faggot" has had many uses in old english, but now that slang has overwhelmed the word, it means something completely different. Words are a means in which to convey our thought and although there are some words that are not used properly, tropical is not one of them. In biology we use tropical to state the biome in which there is warm and humid atmosphere.

I am not trying to stick my nose up at you or anything, just thought I would state it.

Another example is "fantastic" which we use as an alternative of amazing or great, but the other definition that tends to be frowned upon is having to do with fantasy.
 

asfouts

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anyway this isnt really a word forum. I just wanted to say awesome setup to Energy. I know you have recieved many congrats on the tank but their is no harm in more ;) stupid question but how do you heat the water which I am assuming to be 400+ gallons?
 

asfouts

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I think you are wrong about no breeding going to happen. Some of the tads will survive. The Parents will also transport them around to new plants or "pool" cites.
Also I agree with punctata. I remembered reading somewhere that PDFs piggyback their young to pools. And if the pools dry they carry them elsewhere. So if you have bromeliads or other water holding areas you have a possibilty of lil PDFs running amuck. Not bad at all :)
 

Energy

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Heating is done with 5 -300 watt heaters on a controller. I have a 260 gallon sump attached to the display tank where the heaters are located.
 

FrogEyes

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Regards to your definition here. That is only one use of the word tropical...
You're right - but you miss the point - two in fact. First,the alternate definitions of "tropical" all derive from the root one, which is essentially latitudinally based, and are comparative not definitive. That is, we describe things as "tropical" because they resemble what we stereotypically perceive as being the nature of the tropics [even though that stereotype is incomplete and to some extent inaccurate], but we do so in a comparative manner [ie, "tropical heat", "it seemed tropical"; but not "tropical forests of Oregon"]. Because of that, we have the second point, which is that you CANNOT state that *** is not "tropical" when it DOES in fact meet at least one definition of the word. For that matter, the primary definition. Any place in the tropics is "tropical", regardless of whether it adheres to our stereotyped views of the tropics. Any place outside of the tropics is NOT tropical, although it may comparatively seem so.

Arguably, in the latter case, one could adhere to a climatic rather than purely latitudinal definition, in which case some places outside of the tropics would by climatically identical and continuous with places within the tropics. Regardless though, a glacier or desert within the tropics...is tropical.
 

asfouts

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Yes one could argue that point infinitely, but when used currently it has to do with the biotype of the area. Yes it was derived from the latitudes between the tropics, but it does not matter in current uses, the way kaysie used it was correct under current uses of the word.

Take for example "fantastic" again. It fits so perfectly with the uses of words. The current use is to mean "good" or "great", like tropical refers to heavy rainfall and humid climate. Like "tropical" the current use of the definition is a comparitive one. It is used comparitively because of the old definition that is considered "out of date" by english standards. The old definition of "fantastic" was to mean of fantasy, unnatural. Which is where the current definition comes from. Something seems fantastic when it seems so great that it is almost fantasy, or unreal.

I know where you are coming from but arguing the true definitions of comparitive words (latter derived from former) is an uphill battle. The current use will always win.
 

FrogEyes

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Yes one could argue that point infinitely, but when used currently it has to do with the biotype of the area. Yes it was derived from the latitudes between the tropics, but it does not matter in current uses, the way kaysie used it was correct under current uses of the word.
No, it was NOT correct, because the argument was that salamanders of the tropics are not tropical - when by definition they absolutely are. This is less a matter of definition than of logic. In order to be excluded from accepted definitions, something must be excluded from ALL such definitions. Tropical salamanders meet at least one definition, and in some cases all of them.
 

asfouts

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Interesting... Damn I misread the post it seems... I swear it said something completely different, I looked at it a second time, and you are completely correct that was a misuse of the word. It is confusing the way it was used, because kaysie is describing a place in the tropics as not tropical when what should have been said is that it is a cloudy forest dweller, not a rainforest dweller, or something along those lines. I thought the word had been used outside the area of the tropics, but to define a biotype compared to said area.
 

wrage

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i know this has been said but just wanted to say that this is amazing!
 

markcorpus

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I recently came across pics and a video of your setup somewhere out in cyberspace that I can't remember and it is spectacular. Well done!
 

bdunbar12

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this is AMAZING. HOW did you craft something like this? I feel like I'm viewing a mangrove from underwater. A lot of the animals you have in here are found in mangroves, and the way you designed it really does resemble one of these magnificent estuaries.

I am totally jealous!
 

animal lova

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love the setup, looks like something you'd find out bush somewhere.:D don't know how you find anything in there, and where on earth did you find that tank its massive.:eek:
 
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baddfish

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All i can say is "WOW" ! Thats looks as nice (if not nicer) than most of the tanks ive seen set up at chicago's 'Shedd Aquarium' museum. ;)
 

malduroque

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I know I'm resurrecting an older post but I do have to say that what you've done is the unattainable dream of everyone who has ever put together a vivarium. I salute you sir!
 

AnimlEnthusiast

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Your paludarium is absolutely gorgeous! Thanks for sharing your pictures with us, I was excited to see those! But, when I saw the video, I was even more excited, to see how it all goes together, and see everything in motion!

What technique did you use to make your land area totally open underneath? I've been brainstorming ways of doing that, myself, and yours is definitely the best-looking version I've come across. Yours also has to be quite sturdy in order to be that large and hold all of the weight of the land area. If you don't mind giving the details, I would love to know how you constructed this!
 
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Hey, my yellow spotted salamander has gotten a bit fat, he doesnt wanna move too much, and I notice he lays with his back legs flat out in front of him, but keeps his chest off the ground with his front legs. He CAN use his back legs to move around, but Im a little concerned about his back legs being flat out like that, and Im wondering snce he doesnt do a whole lot, will he lose function of his back legs? Kinda like a human would if they never used them? Also what is a slamander poop suppsoed to look like? I was told to spot clean poops and pees but after 4 months of feeding him and having him I havent ever seen a single thing I can identify s a poop...
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  • FragileCorpse:
    ...other than these little oblong shaped bits of dirt thats compacted together, I figure those must be poops because how else is the dirt getting compacted into an oblong shape like that? And he tends to roll those to his front entryway of his rock cave for me to move them away from the entrance. Are those poops? Mine will ONLY eat sal bugs. otherwise known as potato bugs, roly polys, etc. Hes never struck at anything else ive given him. Are the roly polys even enough nutrients for him? Ive captured like 400 of them for the winter months.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    When i lay a roly poly a bit far away from him, he WILLuse his back legs to come out, so he IS using them sometimes, its just concerning to see him with his legs flat out like that. Is that just normal for them?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    *also actually unsure of his sex, if the sex of the salamander means anything in this instance, I as told females are bigger and fatter, so I assume it might be a female tbh.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Please let me know if amyone knows amything, as I can not get adequate info anywhere else.
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  • SamAxolotl:
    @FragileCorpse, the chat room is a good way to get some basic answers. if you're looking for more detailed answers, go to caudata.org home page and then scroll down to newt and salamander help. I think you might be able to get some more answers from there from people with experience with newts/ salamanders specifically. you could probably also contact a breeder and see if they have advice for you. Some vets also have info on exotic animals as well. local wildlife centers/ rehab facilities/ rescues may also be a good resource to look into. hope your little guy feels better soon!
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  • FragileCorpse:
    I cant contact the vet or facilities because they keep trying to take my salamander and fine me cuz i dont have a permit. however i foudn him outside dying and nursed him back to health. So I need to be discreet about getting info. However, if anything actually becomes wrong with him, in order to save him I will have to surrender him to a vet. But thanks for the info I appreciate that
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  • FragileCorpse:
    We are about to be slammed by a category 4 hurricane. I need you guys to tell me how to saf ely transport my salamander. What kind of mobile go-terrarium can I make for him??? Can it be a plastic tote full of eco earth (cocount husk) and maybe his hidey rock and I can keep a spray bottle to keep him moist??? wtf do I do???? I have a bunch of his bugs in plastic containers thankfully so I can bring them with us. But he hates vibrations, trying to bring him out in a car or something is gonna be scary. Can these guys die of fright like a guinea pig can kind of deal???
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Maybe I should just go literally buy a smaller more mobile terrarium? Hes in a giant glass beast right now.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Man I wish I had more than one day to plan!!! My house wont even survive this!
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  • SamAxolotl:
    @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid (I've seen a lot of people keep reptiles etc in plastic tubs their whole lives happily) Not sure about the fear/ shock aspect, but maybe bring a towel or blanket to put over the tote (if it's a clear tote, that is) as well to keep it dark for him so he doesn't get spooked by so much movement that will be going on. I've used that for other animals and it seems to be effective for keeping them calm. See if you can get your hands on some earthworms for food. they're nutritionally dense and it looks like that's one of the main things your salamander would be fed in captivity. Crickets were another suggestion for food as well. praying you all stay safe!
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    SamAxolotl: @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid... +1
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