Ambystoma mavortium breeding

P

paul

Guest
Hello,

I'm new here,

I'm from France, and I hope my english is not too bad,

I've been breeding Ambystoma mavortium for 3 years now,

here the pics of the latest breeding of April,

new pics of the growing larva very soon !









(Message edited by axolotlman on June 14, 2005)
 
F

francesco

Guest
Interesting... some people here used to think it was impossible to breed them in captivity. How did you breed them? A friend of mine did it in a very big tank in his garden
 
P

paul

Guest
hello Francesco,

I't is not impossible, I already made it 3 times (2003,2004,2005),

the adults are kept in a 100x30x45cm aquaterrarium, in my garden from march to november, and in a cold room in winter,

I feed them with pieces of heart of beef, crickets, and big earthworms.

I don't know what to tell you, they breed and I find it easy, This year I choose the male and the femelle I wanted to breed, and put the others apart,

I, now, have 200 larvae that I feed with daphnia,

I will post new pics tomorow...

Paul.
 
M

mark

Guest
That's fantastic Paul. I'm hopefully going to try a similar large container, outdoor/cold room breeding attempt with A.maculatum next year. Could you post a picture of you tank set-up outdoors? Many thanks - Mark
 
M

mark

Guest
Hi Paul,

Very interesting news. Well done.

Do they start to breed usually right when you bring the tank outside in March?

Also, how much of the tank is water? I have my tigers in a 120x45x30 cm tank, but only about 1/5 of the tank is water. My male and female eastern tigers spent a lot of time in the water area for a few months in winter/spring, but never did breed.
 
J

jameswei

Guest
if im not mistaken... Tim posted information about a gentlemen in Japan who succesfully breeded tigers as well. I didnt follow the post as i should of but i got the impression that more information would follow as how the breeding was possible.
 
J

jennifer

Guest
Paul, congratulations! This is an unusual species to breed. Many people want to know how to do this. How deep is the water? What is the land:water ratio? Do you have a photo of the tank setup?

I encourage you to write down all the details and try to get this published in a magazine. Or submit it to a website (like Caudata Culture!). I can help you with translation into English, if needed.

We North Americans should be ashamed. People in other countries have more success than we do with breeding some N. American species (mudpuppies and tiger sals come to mind).
 
P

paul

Guest
hello, thank you for the congratulations,

unfortunatelly I didn't have the time to take new photos yesterday, I wanted but didn't have the time , too much work feeding the larvae (200)...

Here's a little drawing to explain the set up,

I put some oak dead leaves in the water and a little moss, I use rainwater,

I feed my mavortium twice a week during spring,summer and autumn, they don't eat in winter,

and When i put them in water in march, they bred !


 
P

paul

Guest
a photo of young ambystoma born in 2003,

I think they are melanostictum x mavortium because at that time mavortium and melanostictum where together but this year I separated them !

Excuse me I'm not very good in english...
 
F

florent

Guest
hello Paul,

congratulations :)

Very nice, the color of the young is very interesting, they are very white when they are again in the eggs !
 
A

ana

Guest
hi Paul,
congratulations!they are very beautifull

u have same for me??heheheheheh
regards
Ana
 
P

paul

Guest
I just found old photos i posted on a french forum,

ambystoma adults, female and male and a young of 2003,

and the terrarium when i built it







 
M

mark

Guest
Wow, very much like my setup. But mine has about 24cm water, so its not quite as long as the 30cm.

But this is very good news, because it means maybe breeding is possible in my tank.

I noticed you said you don't feed them in winter.
(How cold do you keep the room?)
Maybe the lack of feeding helps to trigger the breeding? Anyone agree?
 
M

mark

Guest
Lack of feeding would be a symptom of hibernation but I'd be surprised if this was a trigger for breeding. It's more likely to be environmental triggers such as temperature or rainfall. I would think that a proper hibernation at a suitable cold temperature is necessary to encourage breeding, (some may disagree). Outdoors might be the only way to provide the required "ingredients".
 
S

sergé

Guest
That's excellent news...Europeans beat the Americans now on their on territory
..there are so little reports on breeding this species and like Francesco I only knew people who bred them in outdoor enclosures. You should publish it somewhere in a magazine! This deserves wide attention, because it can perhaps help in saving endangered species like Ambystoma californiense!
 
W

william

Guest
it's interesting that you use oak leaves and not a soil based substrate. how long did it take to find the winning formula?
 
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • Chat Bot:
    ChocoUniversa has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    Go to the fishless cycle tab :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • MidgetMan:
    @tduzz, where do you live? Like roughly. What country are you in?
    +1
    Unlike
  • tduzz:
    @MidgetMan, Massachusetts but I can give anywhere in the new England area
    +1
    Unlike
  • AMurry24537:
    @ChocoUniversa, Buy some ammonia and an eyedropper from Walmart and a water test kit for ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Figure out (through testing) how many drops it will take to get the ammonia level to the test's maximum measurement. Add that same number of drops every 24 hours. Eventually, the ammonia will start to go down as it's converted to nitrites. Keep adding ammonia. The nitrite levels will spike for a while and then they too will start to go down as they convert to nitrates. These you get rid of by doing water changes, which you should be doing anyway throughout the process. Once all of these are at low levels, your aquarium is ready. It takes about a month, maybe two (mine took a month and a half). Be sure to add ammonia until the day of or the day before you add your axolotl.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Kmia_13:
    Hey guys, this is my first time using this so bear with me. I have an adult axie who looks like he’s developed some fungus on gills. It’s still really small and only on one part. I put him in a 10 gal quarantine tank with an Indian almond leaf. I want to give him a black tea bath but not sure if I can add my black tea to the tank with the Indian almond leaf in there. Any advice?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Hi, My axolotl has just started morphing, but has some fungal spot behind the gill.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Should I fridge therapy and salt wash? or will this not be wise when she is morphing.
    +1
    Unlike
  • BChen3695:
    Need help identifying what’s wrong with my axolotl
    +1
    Unlike
  • Unlike
  • Unlike
  • madcaplaughs:
    @BChen3695, what are your parameters and temp? The fact that they're raised bumps could indicate fungus or bacterial infection.
    +2
    Unlike
  • XxJennXx:
    Hi! I have recently gotten a spotted salamander. Did some research and found lots of info, but just wondering if they brumate in captivity! Thank you to anyone who can answer this ☺
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    Hello its urgent!
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    I have a tiger salamander and i got him as a gift , recently it looks like something has been eating at his tail! Almost like its dissolving..? Ive checked that there is no other bugs in the closure, ive also ben giving him salt baths but its inly getting worse. Sorry if its much hahaha im just super worried!😓
    +1
    Unlike
  • afmtgn:
    Hi @Pookisoo it seems to be a fungal disease
    +1
    Unlike
  • MVM1991:
    @XxJennXx, I don't believe so. They are closely related to tigers and my tiger doesn't brumate. I think first year they might but after they see they aren't needing to, they should be good. They might try and hibernate to, mine did for the first year but now I see him crawling around right now.
    +1
    Unlike
  • XxJennXx:
    @MVM1991, ok thanks :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    @afmtgn, is there anything i can do about it?
    +1
    Unlike
  • RG:
    @Pookisoo, The refrigerator is a good hospital for tigers.Temperature between 7 and 2 degrees Celsius can stop bacteria. If necessary or if you dare 0 to -2 can also help.Reduce the temperature in a few days from 7 degrees to 2. After that you can reduce further. Feel free to let it sit for a few weeks. Place the animal in a plastic container with a lid with some air holes. Fill it with some soil and / or leaves. Check regularly whether there is still moisture or ice in this container. At temperatures above 2 degrees, they do not go into hibernation. They will then live on their reserves. Doing nothing is not an option, I speak from experience. You can avoid these kinds of problems by keeping them fairly dry for much of the year.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Paige1warren:
    Hi guys! I’m new to this site and a new axolotl owner. I’ve had my baby (his name is toothpick) for about a month or so now. I finally got a water testing kit and I tested the perimeters earlier today. My ammonia was at 3 ppm and my nitrite was at 2 ppm. This freaked me out because I know they are supposed to be at 0 ppm. I did a water change a little bit ago and it went down to ammonia 1 ppm and in between 1-2 ppm nitrate. I change 50% of my water weekly and clean up any pieces of waste or excess food with a turkey bastwr everyday. Could this just be because the tank isn’t fully cycled yet? Should I be concerned? Toothpick hasn’t shown any signs of distress
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    @RG, yeah.. im a new owner and i thought just giving salt baths would work, Thank you so much for this tho!🤗
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    Sorry again... but when i take him out is he supposed to be moving funny..? Sorry hahaha🤕
    +1
    Unlike
  • madcaplaughs:
    @Paige1warren You need to tub your axolotl and perform 100% daily water changes. Your tank is not fully cycled, and any readings of ammonia or nitrite are toxic and potentially deadly. A fully cycled tank should at all times have readings of 0ppm ammonia/0ppm nitrite/0pmm<nitrate.
    +1
    Unlike
    madcaplaughs: @Paige1warren You need to tub your axolotl and perform 100% daily water changes. Your tank is... +1
    Top