Batrachoseps what?

lexmiller

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My field herping in the Humboldt area in November was great. I recorded seeing five B. attenuatus.

Now I am concerned I may have mis-identified two species.

I think I may have photographed a B. minor and a B. relictus.

Please help me figure this out....

I have attached three photos of very different looking Batrachoseps
 

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vide

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The only Batrachoseps in Humbolt County is B.attenuatus.

Did you see any other sals on your trip?

Cheers, Vide
 

lexmiller

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Yeah I saw Ensatina escholtzii. I believe they were E.e. picta and E.e. escholtzii.

I know that B. attenuatus is indigineous to the Humboldt area. I thought perhaps there might be a small population of the other two species.
 

jake96

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All the pictures look like color varients of B.attenuatus. I am suprised those are the only color varients you found. In my back yard i can find at least 2 varients at any given time.
 

lexmiller

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Thanks.

I originally identified them as B. attenuatus, but upon further research I found the other two species looked a lot like some of the pictures.

But if these are variants then I will take your word for it jake. You seem to be the Slender Salamander expert from your previous postings. I think it's awesome that you can just stroll through your yard and find wildlife. So cool.

I'm jealous.
 

bewilderbeast

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Location is probably the best indicator of species for Batrachoseps. And as previously stated, there is only one that occurs in Humboldt. B. attenuatus is the most variable in color... I have seen black, brown, red and yellow under one rock in my parent's backyard in contra costa county. I have also found an albino?/leucistic specimen in their yard?

I recently found one that was blue... sorta...
here is a pick
 

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bewilderbeast

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Also... what you found were not Ensatina eschsholtzii eschscholtzii because the location is all wrong. Humboldt has an integrade between E. picta and E. oregonensis. Like the B attenuatus they are extremely variable in color from individual to individual.

I suggest Robert Stebbins' "Peterson guide to reptiles and amphibians of the western US"... sleep with it under your pillow...

here is a map I illustrated of ensatina distribution... no integrades though...
 

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lexmiller

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Also... what you found were not Ensatina eschsholtzii eschscholtzii because the location is all wrong. Humboldt has an integrade between E. picta and E. oregonensis. Like the B attenuatus they are extremely variable in color from individual to individual.

I suggest Robert Stebbins' "Peterson guide to reptiles and amphibians of the western US"... sleep with it under your pillow...

here is a map I illustrated of ensatina distribution... no integrades though...

Cool...I'll check that book out.

You are correct. I made a mistake with the E.e. escholtzii. Eitgher way they were beautiful.
 
C

Cliygh and Mia

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Hey, I know this is an old thread, but does anybody keep these guys in captivity? They have a Bolittaglossa look to them
 
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