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blackworms

merk199

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Just curious to what everyones avg lifespan of a blackworm culture is. I change the water every 2-3 days, with aquarium water cooled. And once a week if I remember I throw in a few fish flakes, or yeast. They seem to be multiplying since I keep finding new small worms but I may be wrong. My original 8 oz package seems to me still is 8 oz...And I feed some to my fish 3-4 times a week and to my newts 2-3 times a week.
 

Kurt

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You know I never thought about culturing them. I used to buy them at Tropic Isle when I worked there. I haven't purchased any in years. I don't think I have any thing that will eat them other than a turtle and some fish and they are being fed other, much easier to manage, stuff.

I wonder if fire-bellied toad would eat them. What are you feeding them to?
 

merk199

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Kurt right now I am feeding them to white cloud minnows, and cynops ensicauda. Both take them well. Make yourself a strainer/enclosure or buy one and I will give you some to try.
 

SludgeMunkey

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The trick to blackworms is cold, oxygenated, flowing water and a gravel substrate. They reproduce a bit on the slow side. Frankly, I found the time, effort and equipment required to culture them in usable amounts at home is cost prohibitive over purchasing them. They will breed freely in the substrate, but harvesting them is a pain and yields are very low on a small scale.

Purchased worms can be kept for weeks, even months in the fridge. When you first get the culture, rinse them really well with cold bottled spring water, removing any dead or decaying worms. Occasionally you will find various leeches, planarians or bloodworms in the culture. You can remove these if you like, but it is not necessary.

Next, you will need two disposable Tupperware type containers (I use the Ziploc brand myself) and one lid. Take one of the containers and punch a bunch of small holes throughout the bottom and first bottom inch of the sides. Place this "holy" container inside the other one. Add your worms and one bottle of cold spring water. Snap the lid in place and keep this container in the back of the fridge, or the vegetable drawer. Try to keep enough water in the container to keep the worms covered.

At least once a week, preferably two times, do a complete water change with cold bottled spring water, removing any dead worms. If you like, once a week "feed" them with about 1/8th of a teaspoon of goldfish flakes, ground to a very fine powder.

This is the "hard" way of doing it.

The easy way is to buy the blackworm keeper from the California Blackworms link here in the forums. It really is worth the money.
 
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merk199

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I highly recommend California Blackworms. Good quality worms at a great price. I would also recommend buying their worm keeper as well. I think I have had mine for around two months. I change the water every 2-3days or when it smells funky.
 

roobot5000

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I highly recommend California Blackworms. Good quality worms at a great price. I would also recommend buying their worm keeper as well. I think I have had mine for around two months. I change the water every 2-3days or when it smells funky.

Do you have any idea where you can purchase the worm keeper online?
I haven't had any luck tracking one day at the local pet shops here.
Didn't know if you had a site you preferred for worms/supplies.
Thanks,
Lee
 
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Alejandro

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California Blackworms have the worm keeper for sale also. I find this item is a very convenient one to keep them long term.
 

Kurt

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Kurt right now I am feeding them to white cloud minnows, and cynops ensicauda. Both take them well. Make yourself a strainer/enclosure or buy one and I will give you some to try.

I will pass for now. I don't really have a need for them. All my critters that require live food feed outside of water. The two fish and turtle I have eat anything I throw their way, so the worms aren't really needed. But thanks any way.
 

tbarrera

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Is there anywhere I can get just a small amount of black worms online? I can not find them locally and just have one small red eft so there is no need for a giant amount which is all I can seem to find so far. Also I don't even know if the little guy likes them yet.
 

Jennewt

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You could try Carolina Biological supply. But most of the online places sell large amounts. To just try them, your best bet is to find a pet shop that sells them. If you live in a remote area, it's something to get the next time you're in the Big City, wherever that might be. It's worth looking in the yellow pages and google for small pet stores with aquatics, and call and ask them if they have them.
 

Kaysie

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Taylor, if you live anywhere near Lansing, Preuss Pets sells live blackworms.
 
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Hey, my yellow spotted salamander has gotten a bit fat, he doesnt wanna move too much, and I notice he lays with his back legs flat out in front of him, but keeps his chest off the ground with his front legs. He CAN use his back legs to move around, but Im a little concerned about his back legs being flat out like that, and Im wondering snce he doesnt do a whole lot, will he lose function of his back legs? Kinda like a human would if they never used them? Also what is a slamander poop suppsoed to look like? I was told to spot clean poops and pees but after 4 months of feeding him and having him I havent ever seen a single thing I can identify s a poop...
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    ...other than these little oblong shaped bits of dirt thats compacted together, I figure those must be poops because how else is the dirt getting compacted into an oblong shape like that? And he tends to roll those to his front entryway of his rock cave for me to move them away from the entrance. Are those poops? Mine will ONLY eat sal bugs. otherwise known as potato bugs, roly polys, etc. Hes never struck at anything else ive given him. Are the roly polys even enough nutrients for him? Ive captured like 400 of them for the winter months.
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    When i lay a roly poly a bit far away from him, he WILLuse his back legs to come out, so he IS using them sometimes, its just concerning to see him with his legs flat out like that. Is that just normal for them?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    *also actually unsure of his sex, if the sex of the salamander means anything in this instance, I as told females are bigger and fatter, so I assume it might be a female tbh.
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  • SamAxolotl:
    @FragileCorpse, the chat room is a good way to get some basic answers. if you're looking for more detailed answers, go to caudata.org home page and then scroll down to newt and salamander help. I think you might be able to get some more answers from there from people with experience with newts/ salamanders specifically. you could probably also contact a breeder and see if they have advice for you. Some vets also have info on exotic animals as well. local wildlife centers/ rehab facilities/ rescues may also be a good resource to look into. hope your little guy feels better soon!
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  • FragileCorpse:
    I cant contact the vet or facilities because they keep trying to take my salamander and fine me cuz i dont have a permit. however i foudn him outside dying and nursed him back to health. So I need to be discreet about getting info. However, if anything actually becomes wrong with him, in order to save him I will have to surrender him to a vet. But thanks for the info I appreciate that
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  • FragileCorpse:
    We are about to be slammed by a category 4 hurricane. I need you guys to tell me how to saf ely transport my salamander. What kind of mobile go-terrarium can I make for him??? Can it be a plastic tote full of eco earth (cocount husk) and maybe his hidey rock and I can keep a spray bottle to keep him moist??? wtf do I do???? I have a bunch of his bugs in plastic containers thankfully so I can bring them with us. But he hates vibrations, trying to bring him out in a car or something is gonna be scary. Can these guys die of fright like a guinea pig can kind of deal???
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    Maybe I should just go literally buy a smaller more mobile terrarium? Hes in a giant glass beast right now.
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    Man I wish I had more than one day to plan!!! My house wont even survive this!
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    @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid (I've seen a lot of people keep reptiles etc in plastic tubs their whole lives happily) Not sure about the fear/ shock aspect, but maybe bring a towel or blanket to put over the tote (if it's a clear tote, that is) as well to keep it dark for him so he doesn't get spooked by so much movement that will be going on. I've used that for other animals and it seems to be effective for keeping them calm. See if you can get your hands on some earthworms for food. they're nutritionally dense and it looks like that's one of the main things your salamander would be fed in captivity. Crickets were another suggestion for food as well. praying you all stay safe!
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    SamAxolotl: @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid... +1
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