Breeding salamandra algira algira

toadinthehole

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Do you need any special conditions for gravid females to give birth to live fully metamorphosed larvae (I have the species that are meant to do this, but is this consistent or can it depend on environmental conditions?
 

Blackbun

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I'm not too familiar with this subspecies but experience has taught me that tiny salamanders and newly metamorphed newts are vulnerable to desiccation. Whilst I keep the enclosure damp by fine misting, I'd not want it water logged. The other issue is getting them started feeding. Small crickets, aphids and fruit fly might appear ideal but could be tricky to catch. I use chopped worms which I place, using fine forceps, directly in front of their snout. It appears food needn't be alive but the tiny muscular contractions of chopped worm segments catch the attention and illicit the feeding response.

I had a quick look using Google to find out specific details for this animal tending to consider habitat and climate.
North African fire salamander videos, photos and facts - Salamandra algira | ARKive
Please let us know how you're getting on.
 

schmiggle

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I presume this means you have a gravid female S. algira, which is awesome! However, according to the webpage that Blackbun just mentioned, only S. a. tingitana gives birth to live young. So I suppose yours will likely give birth to larvae.
Best of luck!
 

Blackbun

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There appears to be a considerable number of scientific publications investigating and discussing temperature and larvae development in salamanders (and other amphibians). I think many state the obvious really that warmer temperatures are associated with increases in rates of growth whilst cooler ones the opposite.
Here's one of the many for interest!
Larval amphibians seek warm temperatures and do not avoid harmful UVB radiation
 
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