Cannabilism in S. salamandra terrestris larvae

toadinthehole

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Any tips on how to avoid this apart from giving loads of live tubifex etc or raising in individual pots? i found previously with ambystoma opacum that separating was essential but thought less of an issue with S.Salamandra species? but already the odd limb seems to be going from new larva . So have separated for now and experiences welcome.
 

Stupot1610

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My salamandra larvae were not very cannibalistic at all. I had 20 larvae and I only lost one or two, and that wasn't to canibalism. So, I wouldn't worry about them eating each other or biting arms/legs of etc.
I also found that larvae would go straight onto dead food as they already have their back legs/sense of smell. So things like frozen bloodworm/tubifex and chopped earthworm worked very well. Of course, live whiteworms, small earthworms, live bloodworms and tubifex work great as food too, so if these are a viable option then I would certainly suggest using them.

Hope this helped. :happy:
 

Blackbun

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In my experience, cannibalism will always be an issue of varying significance (limbs lost and juveniles eaten etc) and occurrence (how often) which can be reduced or prevented (if they are reared independently which isn't always possible given the limitation of resources etc). To reduce the likelihood of cannibalism, I try using a variety of strategies together.

I reduce the density of youngsters in a tank as much as I can. I provide plenty of food (live food such as the larger species of daphnia and tubifex and also chopped worms (the pieces are large enough to display muscular movement. I don't like leaving chunks of uneaten dead food in the water as it degrades water quality. Also crushed cricket innards and the frozen foods obtainable from aquarists such as blood worm. I tend to avoid artemia in case of elevated sodium levels, but that's probably unnecessary. In addition, I ensure there is a lot of weed in the water for hiding places etc.

Despite all of this, some larvae grow large very quickly whilst others very slowly creating issues in its self. Some animals appear to be active cannibals and seek out the smaller tank mates whilst ignoring the other food offered. Even well fed individuals have been known to take a bite at a passing sibling.

I have found cannibalism something to be aware of, but not of major concern.
 
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