Collecting in Delaware

Junito

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I want to go collecting for newts and salamanders in my state. I've searched but no luck, just want to know if I need a permit if so how to go about getting one. Also collecting locations in the area. Thanks.
 

Daimler

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MommaBear

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I'm in Delaware too!
If you figure anything out, let me know if you need help. :)
 

Junito

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So I just got an email from the state saying that unfortunately they do not give out permits. Totally understandable I just wanted to experience the joy of searching and collecting. Thanks
 

Daimler

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you can do herping without collecting :frog:
 

manderkeeper

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I wouldn't think of Delaware as a great collecting location, but I've never actually been there so who knows. A lot of states do allow collecting, sometimes you need a fishing license. Nothing wrong with legal collecting. Most species cannot be effected by collecting because there simply is not enough demand. The small number removed will actually not change the total number of animals because carrying capacity is likely what determines the population size, not small, insignificant amounts of collecting. By that nature, deer hunting would quickly have led to the extermination of all game animals and we take millions as a country every year. This is an area where animal rights types have tried to bully those of us who collect into silence.

I actually think it is far better to go out and collect than to purchase WC animals because you're getting them without exposure to holding facilities and you see their natural habitat first hand... this can be very good for getting an idea of how to set them up in captivity plus the pride of having collected them yourself, much more meaningful than buying them.
 

AdvythAF

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Since you are in Delaware, you could drive to a nearby state where collecting is legal and herp there. The species would be the same :happy:
 

Daimler

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I wouldn't think of Delaware as a great collecting location, but I've never actually been there so who knows. A lot of states do allow collecting, sometimes you need a fishing license. Nothing wrong with legal collecting. Most species cannot be effected by collecting because there simply is not enough demand. The small number removed will actually not change the total number of animals because carrying capacity is likely what determines the population size, not small, insignificant amounts of collecting. By that nature, deer hunting would quickly have led to the extermination of all game animals and we take millions as a country every year. This is an area where animal rights types have tried to bully those of us who collect into silence.

I actually think it is far better to go out and collect than to purchase WC animals because you're getting them without exposure to holding facilities and you see their natural habitat first hand... this can be very good for getting an idea of how to set them up in captivity plus the pride of having collected them yourself, much more meaningful than buying them.
too Junito and manderkeeper
yeah right....
But if who search this animals hasn't got any idea of what is collecting... that animal DIE for a caprice because you can't have a terrarium with the right temperature, substrate, light (or no light), ecc.... FIRST found info about what you want and tell us what is this "special" salamander you are searching in Delaware and then give us some info about the caresheet (and yes first make a caresheet right for that type of newt or salamander)
About the deer, you hount deer to eat them not to breed them :angel:
And when you housing you will never able to create an identical caresheet of their natural habitat in your room (especially for the deer :rolleyes:), for example i have pachytriton and i can't make a river for them :D
and i never do herping in china to know that pachytriton habitat is the river.
We have this animals because we want the best for them, i learn for 5 months what is the best for them and what is the best species for housing and i take 2 Pleurodeles.
You want to collect? well first make experience with the species that you are searching on internet or with books and then buy or collect respecting the law, and remember that a cb animal for newbie is really more easy to feed than a wc for pro ;).

here something that can really help you

1) first found what species you are looking for... search here

Caudata Culture Species Database - All Families


2) read this about the food, tank....

Caudata Culture - Frequently Asked Questions

3) search a shop or someone who sell what you want.

4) in looooot of country the law prohibits to take them in their natural habitat and not only the law but the respect of the country were you live.


:eek:
 
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Junito

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Thanks for the replies. I am not a noob at this at all, just wanted to venture into the excitement of finding amphibians in the wild as I've never done this before. I know what species I want to keep just going to narrow down to just 2 or 3 for now. Thanks
 
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