Costal grooves, dorsolateral, laterally compressed, vertebral (in CC amphib glossary)

fishkeeper

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costal grooves,

dorsolateral ridge and stripe

lateral groove

laterally compressed

nasolabial groove

paratoid gland

SL vs TL
 

Mark

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Costal Grooves – Grooves and on the flanks and dorsum of some salamanders which increase the surface area of the skin for water absorption and provide cutaneous channels which allow water to move up to the dorsum by capillary action.

Paratoid Glands - Permanent glandular structures found behind the heads of some salamandrids. These glands contain high levels of toxins which are secreted or in some cases sprayed at a predator.

Nasolabial grooves - Grooves found on the face of plethodontids that run from the nose to the mouth. During the breeding season they become elongated and a protuberance grows where the groove meets the lip. Thought to aid male salamanders to “smell” females in the area and avoid other males.
 

Otterwoman

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If no one has a picture of a nasolabial groove to add, Cameron has a really nice one I bed he'd let us use to illustrate it. I"ll email him.
 

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Naslolabial groove:


did we do Mental Gland? Because Cameron also said we could use this picture:
(mental gland) moved to other thread
 

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Mark

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Yes, I did mental gland in this thread.

A few more, some of which are repeats. I think it's unwise (and difficult) to try to define every possible structure.

Laterally Compressed – an anatomical description of something compacted from the sides. Usually used to describe the fin like tail shape of aquatic and semi-aquatic caudata.

Dorsolateral – relating to structures or markings that run along the sides of the back. i.e. dorsolateral warts.

Dorsal – relating to structures or markings of the back i.e. dorsal line or fin

Caudal – relating to structures or markings of the tail i.e. caudal fin

Vertebral - relating to structures or markings that run along the spine i.e. vertebral ridge.

Nice photo!
 

Otterwoman

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thanks, I looked in the titles and didn't see it and I forgot. I moved the picture of the mental gland to that thread since it wasn't closed yet. How could I have forgotten those awesome papillae.
The pic above makes me think he's squeezing it and that's what makes the little prongs stick out (like popping a corn snake), because the little eyes look like they're bugging out too.
And what's the opposite of laterally compressed? When you step on something? Squished.
 
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Mark

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I think it's medially compressed, but I'm not sure. Squished is better :D.

Squished - relating to body shape after a sudden medially compression. See [stepped on newt].
 

Abrahm

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And what's the opposite of laterally compressed? When you step on something? Squished.

I think it's medially compressed, but I'm not sure. Squished is better :D.

Squished - relating to body shape after a sudden medially compression. See [stepped on newt].

Whenever I see something described as "squished" its referred to as dorsolaterally compressed. Sudden dorsolateral compression is an excellent new phrase for squished right up there with percussive maintenance.
 

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How's this for a picture of laterally compressed?

Dorsolaterally or medially compressed I'm not furnishing.
 

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Kaysie

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I LOVE percussive maintenance. I used it on my computer just this morning.

Dawn, I don't think your critters can count for compressed in ANY direction.
 

Mark

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Dorsolaterally or medially compressed I'm not furnishing.

Here's a toad that suffered a sudden dorsolateral compression. It wasn't me by the way... I wouldn't be that clumsy :D. Apologies to the squeamish.
 

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MRIGUY

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Dorsolateral means from the back to the side. Would dorsoventral (from the back to the front) not be better for this purpose? We use that term as a non official descriptor for certain industrial and motor vehicle accidents, ie. the patient is DV Compromised.
 

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I discussed this with my boyfriend (marine biologist), and he pointed out that flounders are described as "laterally" or "dorsolaterally" compressed, although personally he preferred dorsoventrally. Maybe it has to do with in what specific direction the compression occurred, or just what rolls more trippingly off the tongue (that, by the way, was said tongue-in-cheek).
Gee, maybe we could have a poll about it. :dizzy:
 

MRIGUY

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I have no dog in this fight so I will defer to the decision of the council.
 

Abrahm

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I have no dog in this fight so I will defer to the decision of the council.

I have no dog either and am going off the same info Dawn's boyfriend has (flounder, scorpionfish, etc being Dorsolaterally compressed.)

But, Dorsoventrally compromised is absolutely hilarious!
 

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Thanks. Years in Healthcare will definately warp all but the most closed minds. The more acute the patients the bigger the warp.

The stories would shock most people.
 

Jan

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Moved to the completed section using Mark's definitions (except for Squished?:confused: :happy:). Nasolabial grooves, parotoid glands, dorsal and caudal are defined elsewhere in the glossary.

Costal Grooves: Grooves and on the flanks and dorsum of some salamanders which increase the surface area of the skin for water absorption and provide cutaneous channels which allow water to move up to the dorsum by capillary action.

Laterally Compressed: An anatomical description of something compacted from the sides. Usually used to describe the fin like tail shape of aquatic and semi-aquatic caudata.

Dorsolateral: Relating to structures or markings that run along the sides of the back i.e., dorsolateral warts.

Vertebral: Relating to structures or markings that run along the spine i.e., vertebral ridge.
 
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