Question: Help Identify Salamander/Newt Found in Ohio

abstractliving

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I found a small(about an inch and a half) guy. He along with about ten or twelve others of the same kind in my grandparents pool. I was wondering why there was such a sudden appearance(on two days they appeared. Before and after very few came). I only managed to save four from the pool, the others had died.

They live right next to a forest/swamp area, if that helps.

20140715_221407.jpg
Sorry for bad quality, this was taken with my phone
 

Chinadog

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The eyes look too prominent for a newt, so I would guess it's some kind of Ambystoma? It's a shame you don't have a clearer picture, although maybe someone who knows the salamanders of Ohio off by heart could say for sure what it is?
 

abstractliving

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My guess is that it's a Ambystoma jeffersonianum, that's the only thing I could find that looked similar to them.

Of course, stupid me decided to take three of them back to Tennessee and now they're in a 20 gal tank as I try to figure out how to care for them. :uhoh:
 

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I'll second A. jeffersonianum given those ET toes, but it'll be hard to say until it develops pattern. They make hardy captives. I received an adult 12 years ago that's still going strong. She eats like a pig.
 

abstractliving

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I'll second A. jeffersonianum given those ET toes, but it'll be hard to say until it develops pattern. They make hardy captives. I received an adult 12 years ago that's still going strong. She eats like a pig.
They do have the slight rib grooves too. Since they're wild I don't know how to feed then yet. My best guess is to put done nightcrawlers in there and hope they're not too stressed to starve... Are they terrestrial? I've been having a hard time finding anything on them.
 

jAfFa CaKe

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I'm pretty sure all ambystoma spp. are terrestrial (apart from in spring of course). After all, they are mole salamanders...
 

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They're small, you'll have to find small food. Nightcrawlers are probably way too big. You could try blackworms on a piece of paper towel.

Or, go outside into a big grassy area that's pesticide free with a butterfly net, and start swooping through the grass and collect your own food. You'll have to sort out things that are big or bitey.
 

abstractliving

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They're small, you'll have to find small food. Nightcrawlers are probably way too big. You could try blackworms on a piece of paper towel.
I've just been collecting small earthworms from a yard of my grandparents. They haven't been eating though.
 

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Sorry I cant help I.D. but maybe to help him feed. What do you have him housed in? When I haven't had any luck hand feeding them I have noticed sometimes they are leary of hands and tweezers but will be more comfortable feeding if you place down a small flat surface and place the worms on that and let them notice it and feed on their own. This method may take some patience but seems to work for me when they are stubborn to eat. Wish you luck!
 

Sir Jagger

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If the worms you dug are fairly small I imagine they will be suitable. Amphibians seem to be able to consume food surprisingly big for their small size but despite this you still need to provide it with food it can manage. Sorry I couldn't be of more help.
 
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