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How do you go about finding salamanders in Georgia?

C

Cliygh and Mia

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Back in Georgia, my dream is to find Ambystoma opacum and Ambystoma Maculatum. But when we go herping (even when it rains) we never find any. It seems like Georgia is a land of lizards and anurans. I mean, I know I'm lucky to even find animals when I go herping, but do you have any tips on finding the above species, and what times (winter, spring, summer or fall) to find them?
 

manderkeeper

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I've not looked specifically in GA, but in general salamanders are pretty easy to find in the breeding season. First, refine your search to fishless, small woodland ponds. They can and do occur even in urban areas and flooded areas but since you've had a stroke of bad luck start in a place like that where many will congregate. Now to know when they will be at the ponds you can take some guesses or download articles regarding studies of the species in your state which usually include exact weather conditions such as "the first rains in jan when the temp is over 45F" and those details can be helpful when known. I've found lots of marbled salamanders under logs at the edges of fishless ponds in fall in upland area, in drift fences around ponds I made, and under logs in wooded areas next to swamps.
 

AdvythAF

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I have never been to Georgia, or herped there, but I would recommend looking up the species you want to find. Many websites, such as state fish and game websites, can provide great information on where to find the species. First target the habitat the salamander prefers, then locate that habitat. Sometimes, salamanders prefer even more specific habitats, for example a specific plant community, a specific species of tree, a type of forest cover, or like manderkeeper said, fish-less ponds. Then, find out the salamander species' breeding season, wait for rains, and then start flipping logs. This is the strategy I use to find caudates, I'm not sure how it is herping in Georgia. Good luck!
 

jbherpin

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Back in Georgia, my dream is to find Ambystoma opacum and Ambystoma Maculatum. But when we go herping (even when it rains) we never find any. It seems like Georgia is a land of lizards and anurans. I mean, I know I'm lucky to even find animals when I go herping, but do you have any tips on finding the above species, and what times (winter, spring, summer or fall) to find them?

Both are readily found in suitable habitat(areas surrounding small to intermediate fishless flood lands) under forest debris on hillsides. A. opacum are protected from collection in many states, where as A. maculatum are less 'governed'. A. opacum will be most readily encountered between August and October, and A. maculatum in February through late march depending on weather and locality. A. maculatum egg masses develop a greenish tint. I you find these, adults are assuredly within close proximity. Best of luck. Both frequently share breeding sites, suggesting if you locate one, you are likely not far from the other. Hope this helps... I will add that both are quite tolerant of drier conditions than other ambystomids.

JBear
 
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C

Cliygh and Mia

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Oh, and there is a creek that I go to, but I think the reason I haven't found any is that there is too much human disturbance. Not like trash and litter or anything, but every time I go herping there, there's like 20 people, and they bring their dogs, and go fishing for minnows,(Eastern Silvery) so I don't think that the salamanders would like that much disturbance
 
C

Cliygh and Mia

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Is it okay for me to say what name the creek is? It's not a location problem so I think that I can say what it's called :confused:
 

manderkeeper

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A brook would be better to find some species of lungless salamander larvae in and the adults with be under stones nearby or under stones in the steam itself depending on the species, but for the mole salamander family you will have more luck with fishless, woodland ponds and sometimes I've found their larvae in flooded areas, too. If you're going to collect them, I would not take the adults, but I would collect only a tiny amount of the larvae.
 
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  • blubford:
    my idea was to have two one in the tank and one freezing and by the time the first melts i switch it out with the one freezing and repeat
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  • blubford:
    and for the land i think they can just go into the water to cool off
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  • axolotl nerd:
    yeah i think that sounds like a good plan :)
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  • NeilP:
    Hello
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  • NeilP:
    I have two axolotls (one boy and one girl) and I recently changed them to feeding every other day. Since then, the female has lost two gils and then red marks appeared on two of her legs Which my local aquatic centre said looked like bite marks rather than red leg) and this morning, the female's front left leg is having on by a thread. I was going to the by a divider for my tank to stop them mating but now it seems I need to buy it asap to stop the male eating the female. I have a 125 ltr tank so space should not be an issue, but does anyone have any advice and will the female need a salt bath or anything else?
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  • the:
    she should be ok as axolotls can regenerate limbs, the only this i would say is to mabey feed the male more as this type of behavuor is uslay down to hunger.
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  • Shane_Yogurt:
    hey, anyone know how long bloodworms can stay in an axolotl tank before they begin to rot and cause an ammonia spike?
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  • melon:
    I think it is always best to get them out asap but probably two days or so.
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  • Shane_Yogurt:
    its around 3 small pieces in the tank. Since i've just moved homes, my axolotl is still at my old house. Yesterday i fed him bloodworms and he missed a few. I couldnt get them out without a turkey baster and decided to let them sit because i was gonna move him to the house tomorrow. But now its late and I dont have a car and my dad wont drive me. Will he be fine?
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  • melon:
    I would think so i would just try to get them out tomorrow
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  • Shane_Yogurt:
    yeah, im heading over tomorrow morning to move him to this house and feed him. Thanks for the help!
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  • Shane_Yogurt:
    So my axolotl tank cycle just crashed and while i was in the middle of a water change my bucket overflowed and spilled water all of the ground in my brand new home. This is going super well 👍
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  • the:
    ooff
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  • the:
    good luck recycling the tank!
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  • Roach:
    do the classifieds still exist?
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  • Roach:
    nevermind! off my game tonight
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  • Shane_Yogurt:
    Im so frustrated right now. My axolotl WONT eat and my tank still isnt looking too good. Some extra stress i needed.
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  • John:
    Sorry to hear that Shane. Did you post about it?
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  • Shane_Yogurt:
    No, I havent. Im not really sure why he wont eat. Hes in a 1 gallon tub and still a juvenile. When i offer food he swims away from it. Does he need some extra time? or is this something I should be worried about.
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  • JulMl:
    Hello everyone! I’m new in this world and i need some advices please! I have 2 axolotl babies and currently the water from the tank is from bottled water ( all parameters are good) but i want to change 50% of the water with city tap water. My question is how to change it? Do i need to get axis out, do the change, add the prime, wait (how much?) until its dechlorinated or i can add the tap water directly into the tank with axis in it, and add the prime conditioner? Thank you!!
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  • Asmold1:
    1. You dont need to take them out of the tank to change the water as long as you pour it in slow as to not rattle them around too much
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  • Asmold1:
    2. add the prime to your tap water, for most conditioners the consensus is 5 minutes of waiting time
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  • Asmold1:
    3.After 5 minutes it should be safe to add
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  • JulMl:
    Thank you so much !!
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  • Asmold1:
    I private messaged you a bit clearer instructions just in case
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    Asmold1: I private messaged you a bit clearer instructions just in case +2
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