Caudata.org: Newts and Salamanders Portal

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!
Did you know that registered users see fewer ads? Register today!

How soon can young Alpine Newts be kept aquatically?

HeckYeck

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
Location
California
I am very interested in getting a group of alpine newts but wouldn't like to deal with the terrestrial stage that much. A pet store near me has a bunch of 1" long or so babies and I was wondering if I were to get a few how long should I expect it to take before they can be kept aquatically? Thank you so much for any help!
 

Herpin Man

Active member
Joined
Oct 29, 2016
Messages
233
Reaction score
79
Location
Red Wing, MN
I keep them aquatic throughout their life. Is the pet store keeping them terrestrially?
If so, my advice would be to set them up in shallow water, with lots of aquatic vegetation and some cork bark to rest on. Gradually add water until the desired depth has been reached.
 

CWhit

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
34
Reaction score
10
Location
Peterborough
I raised mine from eggs & none have left the water for more than 10 minutes. They have plenty of islands & plants sticking out of the water, but rarely use them.
 

HeckYeck

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
Location
California
Thanks! Yeah they're keeping them terrestrially right now, but I think I will give it a try getting them to go aquatic again!
 

HeckYeck

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
Location
California
Got 4 and put them in a setup with about half an inch of water and some land and they all within an hour got into the water and haven't come out since so I guess I'll have no problems with keeping them aquatically! Thanks for the help guys!
 

CWhit

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
34
Reaction score
10
Location
Peterborough
Got 4 and put them in a setup with about half an inch of water and some land and they all within an hour got into the water and haven't come out since so I guess I'll have no problems with keeping them aquatically! Thanks for the help guys!
Great news!
 

Captive Bread

New member
Joined
Nov 25, 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Arizona
I keep them aquatic throughout their life. Is the pet store keeping them terrestrially?
If so, my advice would be to set them up in shallow water, with lots of aquatic vegetation and some cork bark to rest on. Gradually add water until the desired depth has been reached.
I am looking to get some alpines in the distant future and have the same concern that HeckYeck once did. Getting them into the water sounds very approachable, but keeping them there is a concern of mine. Is there anyway to (safely) force them to remain aquatic? Is there a temperature I can keep the water at, a dieting trick, or lighting trick to keep them from going terrestrial?

If I were to get some, I would want them to be aquatic year round, as I would have to move mountains to make the aquarium go from aquatic to terrestrial. Nature has her own intentions though. I have searched this website and some people made it sound as though the newts will just spontaneously become terrestrial. They also state that the Italian subspecies is far more partial to staying in the water. Have you personally run into any issues?
 

Herpin Man

Active member
Joined
Oct 29, 2016
Messages
233
Reaction score
79
Location
Red Wing, MN
I am looking to get some alpines in the distant future and have the same concern that HeckYeck once did. Getting them into the water sounds very approachable, but keeping them there is a concern of mine. Is there anyway to (safely) force them to remain aquatic? Is there a temperature I can keep the water at, a dieting trick, or lighting trick to keep them from going terrestrial?

If I were to get some, I would want them to be aquatic year round, as I would have to move mountains to make the aquarium go from aquatic to terrestrial. Nature has her own intentions though. I have searched this website and some people made it sound as though the newts will just spontaneously become terrestrial. They also state that the Italian subspecies is far more partial to staying in the water. Have you personally run into any issues?
In my experience, when the larva first morph, they will climb up on the cork bark floats that I provide, and some will even climb the glass. A tight fitting lid is imperative.
After a few weeks they settle down, and resume their aquatic existence. So I guess the trick to keeping them aquatic is to not give them land. Lots of vegetation and small float should be provided for them to rest on, if desired.
While it depends on who you get your newts from, it’s likely that they won’t have been kept terrestrially prior to your receiving them, so there’s really no adjustment to be made.
 

HeckYeck

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
Location
California
I am looking to get some alpines in the distant future and have the same concern that HeckYeck once did. Getting them into the water sounds very approachable, but keeping them there is a concern of mine. Is there anyway to (safely) force them to remain aquatic? Is there a temperature I can keep the water at, a dieting trick, or lighting trick to keep them from going terrestrial?

If I were to get some, I would want them to be aquatic year round, as I would have to move mountains to make the aquarium go from aquatic to terrestrial. Nature has her own intentions though. I have searched this website and some people made it sound as though the newts will just spontaneously become terrestrial. They also state that the Italian subspecies is far more partial to staying in the water. Have you personally run into any issues?
I can't speak for the long term but so far mine only very occasionally go out of the water and spend 90% of the time underwater! It seems like as long as you give them some cork or something to climb out on occasionally they should be all good.
 

Attachments

  • IMG-9939.jpg
    IMG-9939.jpg
    1 MB · Views: 15
  • IMG-9945.jpg
    IMG-9945.jpg
    1.1 MB · Views: 12
  • IMG-9931.jpg
    IMG-9931.jpg
    1 MB · Views: 13

CWhit

Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
34
Reaction score
10
Location
Peterborough
They go where the food is - if the food is in the water, that's where they'll stay. I have floating plants & suction plant pots with the soil just above the waterline but they prefer the water. They sleep underwater (as far as I can tell, they don't move for hours). I was worried too, and had a terrestrial tank ready to go just in case but never needed it.
 

BigMamaSlama

New member
Joined
Dec 11, 2021
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Edinburgh
Hi im new here but earlier this year i caught some wild alpine newts in the uk, i took them back into my garden (very near where i found them both) and setup a tank for them to chill in my garden as my parents have a strict no animals thing, so i just left the lid off and would do water changes once a week until both vanished from their enclosure so i just left the tank to fill with rain water and left the plants to thrive.

now today i was in the garden with my dog and i noticed 3 little black somethings sticking to the glass (i have no idea how pond snails made their way in there) but yeah as i approached i noticed 2 tiny newts chilling on a pile of weeds in the tank (its mostly filled with water with a small island from fish decor) they just barely had any feather gills and both sets of legs are in, they look really marbled and one had a distinct yellowish line down its back

so here i am hours later typing this, of course i wanna keep them as i did accidentally raise them to this point so now i have some questions , have i created an artifical pond ? how have they survived since april? whats the best way to keep alpine newt efts? how did they eat ? what subspecies will it be if its found in the uk ? im really confused and overjoyed about all this
 
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • axolotl nerd:
    betta*
    +1
    Unlike
  • Asholotl:
    Just got to cycle the water. keep the water nice betas are pretty easy since they are very hardy, and they tend to glow once you give them the right attention. ive had a few. they are my go to fish to be honest.
    +1
    Unlike
  • axolotl nerd:
    interesting.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Nichill:
    Hi I'm a bit worried about our axolotl Berry she's approx 4 months old . She had a big meal yesterday of blood worm and today is very restless she's been swimming around all day and trying to get to the top sometimes not making it. Her tummy does seem really full even though she has had 2 poops . There's no gravel in her tank she's on sand . My water seems fine
    +2
    Unlike
  • Nichill:
    Amonia 0 nitrite 0 and pH 7
    +2
    Unlike
  • axolotl nerd:
    pictures would be very helpful- this could possibly be an emergency if it is something like bloat
    +1
    Unlike
  • Nichill:
    I can't seem to upload a pic I've just searched bloat and it's nothing as severe as on there . How do I upload a pic
    +1
    Unlike
  • Nichill:
    I have done another water check and my pH has gone down
    +1
    Unlike
  • rads:
    Hey y’all! So I just had a quick question. I had a well established cycled tank. I added in a sand substrate that I had previously had in the tank (when it cycled the first time). It recycled and everything was golden. As I was re-adding it I noticed a smell to it but figured it was just “fish” smell. I also have a cat. Long story short, I think the cat managed to find the sand, pee in it, and because I was already suspicious I tested my tank just in case a few hours later to find my ammonia 2.0! I pulled my axolotl out and have done a 75% change. Prior to sand earlier today ammonia was 0. So do I add the ammonia blocker or stick to water changes?
    +1
    Unlike
  • rads:
    The tank should be cycled but I believe the sand added too much ammonia that normally wouldn’t be an issue. So I’m thinking ammonia block for the next few days, but then won’t the ammonia just sit there since it can’t be processed? The safer bet is always going to be water changes I know,
    +1
    Unlike
  • axolotl nerd:
    i have no words, honestly. this is like the time i accidentally dropped a worm in the sink and it was never heard from again, just a big “whoops” that i don’t know how to fix— my best advice//what i’d personally do is remove the sand entirely, remove all water, keep the filter media, and just recycle while your axie is tubbed. the sheer amount of ammonia in car urine is insane, and i’m impressed your axolotl survived
    +2
    Unlike
  • rads:
    It was within the span of maybe two hours at most lol. I’ll do that and I have a second tank with lotls in it that has just enough room to temporarily keep them in it. I read up on it and decided to dose with ammo lock since it’s not a cycling tank and was cycled already along with water changes.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    Captive Bread has joined the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • JazAxolotl:
    Hello everyone :]
    +1
    Unlike
  • axolotl nerd:
    hiiiii!! currently on my way to typing out a welcome speech on your thread :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • JazAxolotl:
    Aaa ty
    +1
    Unlike
  • AxieFrankie:
    Hello 🙂
    +1
    Unlike
  • AxieFrankie:
    Happy 2022 everybody! 😁
    +1
    Unlike
  • DeCypher:
    I used to breed axolotls, since I was 14, and sell and barter with people here. Now I’m 24 and the axolotls are fancy breeds for a ton of money. Does anyone have 2 or 3 wilds?
    +1
    Unlike
  • DeCypher:
    or leucistics
    +1
    Unlike
  • Asholotl:
    I have a wild male with protein gene. I soon plan on getting a Lucy female soon.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Nichill:
    Hi just need a bit of advice since I added plants to my tank (java fern ) my nitrate level has gone up to 0.5 what can I do to get them back down . My axolotl seems to love the plants so don't really want to take them out . Thanks
    +1
    Unlike
  • britt6393:
    Hi new to forum and new to axolotl. Checked water parameters this am ph 7.6, high range ph 7.8, ammonia between 0 and 0.25 ppm, nitrate 5.0 ppm, nitrite 0. Should i water change or will this mess up the tank? Thank you
    +1
    Unlike
  • bhollow:
    @britt6393, those water parameters sound good i dont think you need to do a water change. youd do one when the nitrates reach 20ppm
    +1
    Unlike
  • Asholotl:
    Hello Chat!
    +1
    Unlike
    Asholotl: Hello Chat! +1
    Top