Ichthyosaura alpestris apuanus

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
Here are a few shots of my apuanus.

1. The aquarium (plants are Fontinalis and Hydrocotyle ?vulgaris? (pennywort))
2,3,4. Adult female. This animal was rescued from a shop, having spent more than six months wasting away at high (c. 27C) temperatures. She was basically a hyperactive skeleton with skin attached. She is now doing really well and is entirely
5. Another animal, from Alan Cann's brood
6. Larva (from Mark Aartse-Tuyn's brood)
7. Newly morphed juvenile. Quite small, due to the large number of animals reared, but feeding OK.
8. Just for fun, a Trachemys scripta elegans my girlfriend and I rescued the other day (found him emaciated in a local pond).

C
 

Attachments

  • DSCN1392.jpg
    DSCN1392.jpg
    354 KB · Views: 386
  • DSCN1399.jpg
    DSCN1399.jpg
    102.2 KB · Views: 383
  • DSCN1400.jpg
    DSCN1400.jpg
    100.4 KB · Views: 358
  • DSCN1404.jpg
    DSCN1404.jpg
    399 KB · Views: 597
  • DSCN1391.jpg
    DSCN1391.jpg
    99.4 KB · Views: 309
  • DSCN1396.jpg
    DSCN1396.jpg
    399.7 KB · Views: 329
  • DSCN1411.jpg
    DSCN1411.jpg
    231.3 KB · Views: 298
  • DSCN1386.jpg
    DSCN1386.jpg
    118.6 KB · Views: 387

Azhael

Site Contributor
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
92
Points
0
Location
Burgos
Country
Spain
Display Name
Rodrigo
I´m so glad to see Ms Skeleton looking so well! You did a fantastic job.
Congrats on the morphs too, you are going to be swamped soon xD

Beware the turtles, they have a caudate-like addictive quality to them, they are very tempting!
 

Mark

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Messages
3,259
Reaction score
50
Points
48
Location
Bristol
Country
United Kingdom
Looking good Chris. How many morphs do you think you'll get after the fungus business? Enough for your studies?

I'm certain I spotted an apuanus in amongst the kaiseri larvae the other day. If you want it after it morphs give me a shout.
 
Last edited:

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
Thanks for the comments.

I think I will have around 100 morphs, but I need to recount larvae and this is not an accurate estimate! I lost a number of larvae, but only in a few tanks (eggs and baskets and all that!), so a reasonable number have come through so far. Also, some of the remaining ones are very small, so I don't know if they will do well after morphing. I'm hoping that I will have too many, rather than too few, but I will let you know if I need the morph from you - thanks very much for offering.
 

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
A few more pics, mainly of an animal from Morg - this one has weirdly large lips (reminds me of Ranodon!).

C

PS apologies for the odd colour balance...because of the lighting the pics originally came out very yellowed (sort of nostalgic flash-back like) and this was the best I could do to fix it.

C
 

Attachments

  • for caudata 1.jpg
    for caudata 1.jpg
    85.7 KB · Views: 250
  • for caudata 2.jpg
    for caudata 2.jpg
    373.8 KB · Views: 364
  • for caudata 3.jpg
    for caudata 3.jpg
    125.6 KB · Views: 237
  • for caudata 4.jpg
    for caudata 4.jpg
    348 KB · Views: 217
  • for caudata 5.jpg
    for caudata 5.jpg
    380.4 KB · Views: 230
  • for caudata 6.jpg
    for caudata 6.jpg
    386.1 KB · Views: 247
  • for caudata 7.jpg
    for caudata 7.jpg
    262.1 KB · Views: 238

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
A couple more pics of juveniles and setups (some are reared aquatically, others terrestrially; the setup with the mossy island is for morphing). Also a pic of one juvenile trying out the "Unken" reflex (not very good pic).

C
 

Attachments

  • DSCN1613.jpg
    DSCN1613.jpg
    177 KB · Views: 247
  • DSCN1633.jpg
    DSCN1633.jpg
    309.5 KB · Views: 238
  • DSCN1643.jpg
    DSCN1643.jpg
    299.4 KB · Views: 275
  • DSCN1646.JPG
    DSCN1646.JPG
    211 KB · Views: 279
  • DSCN1647.jpg
    DSCN1647.jpg
    279.9 KB · Views: 285
  • DSCN1650.jpg
    DSCN1650.jpg
    344.8 KB · Views: 1,365

Azhael

Site Contributor
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
92
Points
0
Location
Burgos
Country
Spain
Display Name
Rodrigo
Ach....so much moss, and so lush! I hate you...xD
They are looking great, Chris :) The tanks also look lovely. Keep up the good work!

How are you feeding the terrestrial ones, by the way? Do you just let them hunt freely?
 

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
Thanks! The moss is great (thanks Richard!) and one species seems to be growing, as long as I spray daily. The ferns are ?Dryopteris? that appeared around the base of a repotted houseplant, so I assume that the spores drifted in and settled or were in the compost itself.

It is sitting ontop of hides made from sawn up exoterra polystyrene backgrounds that came free with terraria. They seem to work well and have the extra advantage of being much lighter than bricks etc.

I feed both sets of juveniles just by adding food and letting them get on with it. The terrestrial tanks also have resident white worm and springtail populations that they nibble on. I already have way too many to feed by hand and will end up with even more once everyone has metamorphosed. I am checking on them 2 weeks after metamorphosis and so far they all seem plump enough. I occasionally see the aquatic ones going after bloodworm/whiteworm, too.

I plan to use simlar terrestrial setups for my H. orientalis once they morph.
 

ACEPHONECHIC

New member
Joined
Jul 28, 2010
Messages
126
Reaction score
5
Points
0
Location
newton abbot
Country
United Kingdom
Hi I am very new to Alpine newts and have two who have morphed and three still with gills.
I am confused a bit as to what I should allow to provide for the morphed ones. Some advise seems to be water enviroment with some plants that float to allow the little newts to sit on the top if they so desire. I have also placed some large rocks in the bottom of the tank that can be sat on and they do seem to like these. At first i visage that you would have a tank with water down one side and then something to provide a land area covered in moss for them to roam through if they so desire.
So should they really have land to roam or am I better to encourage them to be aquatic and just take advantage of the plants to sit in and on. They are fed Daphina and mosquito lava which they hunt and chase fine. One has tasted worms but they seem to have not grasped yet they are food. The two morphed ones seem very tiny but healthy.
What do the experts advise please. I really want to do the best for them but find them alot more complicated than my five Axies who are now one year old and around 9 inches long.
 

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
It depend on the subspecies. I. a. apuanus can be kept aquatic or terrestrial, while other subspecies commonly kept in captivity need terrestrial setups as juveniles. If you keep apuanus aquatic as juvies, you will need to provide dense vegetation, so that they can sit on top and get their heads out of the water. There are usually a few that climb the sides for a bit, but they become completely aquatic very quickly.

The reason that some of the newts (above) are in completely terrestrial setups, while the rest are completely aquatic, is that I am doing an experiment as part of my PhD to identify what difference the rearing set up makes.

If yours are eating in an aquatic setup, I would leave them there, as making them terrestrial would only cause stress at this point. As with your axies, the same basic rules of cool temps and good water quality apply, but as i said before, having dense vegetation is really important, too.

I wouldn't go with a 50:50 setup, as the newts will likely only use one part and the water part will be much more difficult to keep clean, beimg much smaller. It will also make feeding ore difficult, as you will have to provide both terrestrial and aquatic foods.

Good luck with them!

C
 

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
Some more pictures - this time of advanced larvae. These hatched from eggs from Mark, back in ?March? I think. Although a lot have morphed (60 so far) a lot of them show no signs of morphing and have taken on a darker, slate-like colour.
I intend to keep any further morphs in the same tank (there is an island and they are happy aquatic).

There is also a couple of light-coloured larvae, which show no signs of morphing, either. The one pictured has lost it's gills on one side to a tank-mate.

C
 

Attachments

  • larvae 1.jpg
    larvae 1.jpg
    296.2 KB · Views: 1,243
  • larvae 2.jpg
    larvae 2.jpg
    214 KB · Views: 406
  • larvae 3.jpg
    larvae 3.jpg
    144.7 KB · Views: 215
  • larvae 4.jpg
    larvae 4.jpg
    213.8 KB · Views: 254
  • larvae 5.jpg
    larvae 5.jpg
    224.6 KB · Views: 255
  • larval tank.jpg
    larval tank.jpg
    171.3 KB · Views: 241
  • white larva 1.jpg
    white larva 1.jpg
    183.7 KB · Views: 366

Azhael

Site Contributor
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
92
Points
0
Location
Burgos
Country
Spain
Display Name
Rodrigo
How big are the ones in the first picture? They look very advanced and their colour looks just like some photos of neotenic animals i´ve seen. It´s interesting.
The light one does look leucistic, or is it the flash? I saw my larvae change colour dramatically but nothing as light as that.
They are looking great, Chris, nice job, and i really like your tanks, water, ridiculous amounts of plants and newts, just like i like them :D
 

froggy

Site Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2002
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
21
Points
38
Age
32
Location
Manchester, England
Country
United Kingdom
Display Name
Chris Michaels
Thanks, Rodrigo

The larvae are all between 4.5 and 6 cm long. There definitely seem to be two phenoypes - those that go from normal larval colouration to juvenile colouration and morph, and those that go from larval colouration to a darker colour with black spots on the flanks and show no sign of morphing.

They are maintained at cool temperatures using a growth chamber and so have regular 15C day watertemp, down to about 13C at night. If some of them are becoming neotenic, this could be the reason.

The light animal is as light as it appears in the photo. There are two of them (or there were when I put them into that large tank from lots of small ones) out of about 120 larvae that reached advanced stage. If they reach morph-hood (no reason why they shouldn't) I'll let you know how they turn out. Anyway, they are far less attractive than their wildtype siblings!
 
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • Chat Bot:
    ChocoUniversa has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    Go to the fishless cycle tab :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • MidgetMan:
    @tduzz, where do you live? Like roughly. What country are you in?
    +1
    Unlike
  • tduzz:
    @MidgetMan, Massachusetts but I can give anywhere in the new England area
    +1
    Unlike
  • AMurry24537:
    @ChocoUniversa, Buy some ammonia and an eyedropper from Walmart and a water test kit for ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Figure out (through testing) how many drops it will take to get the ammonia level to the test's maximum measurement. Add that same number of drops every 24 hours. Eventually, the ammonia will start to go down as it's converted to nitrites. Keep adding ammonia. The nitrite levels will spike for a while and then they too will start to go down as they convert to nitrates. These you get rid of by doing water changes, which you should be doing anyway throughout the process. Once all of these are at low levels, your aquarium is ready. It takes about a month, maybe two (mine took a month and a half). Be sure to add ammonia until the day of or the day before you add your axolotl.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Kmia_13:
    Hey guys, this is my first time using this so bear with me. I have an adult axie who looks like he’s developed some fungus on gills. It’s still really small and only on one part. I put him in a 10 gal quarantine tank with an Indian almond leaf. I want to give him a black tea bath but not sure if I can add my black tea to the tank with the Indian almond leaf in there. Any advice?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Hi, My axolotl has just started morphing, but has some fungal spot behind the gill.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Should I fridge therapy and salt wash? or will this not be wise when she is morphing.
    +1
    Unlike
  • BChen3695:
    Need help identifying what’s wrong with my axolotl
    +1
    Unlike
  • Unlike
  • Unlike
  • madcaplaughs:
    @BChen3695, what are your parameters and temp? The fact that they're raised bumps could indicate fungus or bacterial infection.
    +2
    Unlike
  • XxJennXx:
    Hi! I have recently gotten a spotted salamander. Did some research and found lots of info, but just wondering if they brumate in captivity! Thank you to anyone who can answer this ☺
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    Hello its urgent!
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    I have a tiger salamander and i got him as a gift , recently it looks like something has been eating at his tail! Almost like its dissolving..? Ive checked that there is no other bugs in the closure, ive also ben giving him salt baths but its inly getting worse. Sorry if its much hahaha im just super worried!😓
    +1
    Unlike
  • afmtgn:
    Hi @Pookisoo it seems to be a fungal disease
    +1
    Unlike
  • MVM1991:
    @XxJennXx, I don't believe so. They are closely related to tigers and my tiger doesn't brumate. I think first year they might but after they see they aren't needing to, they should be good. They might try and hibernate to, mine did for the first year but now I see him crawling around right now.
    +1
    Unlike
  • XxJennXx:
    @MVM1991, ok thanks :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    @afmtgn, is there anything i can do about it?
    +1
    Unlike
  • RG:
    @Pookisoo, The refrigerator is a good hospital for tigers.Temperature between 7 and 2 degrees Celsius can stop bacteria. If necessary or if you dare 0 to -2 can also help.Reduce the temperature in a few days from 7 degrees to 2. After that you can reduce further. Feel free to let it sit for a few weeks. Place the animal in a plastic container with a lid with some air holes. Fill it with some soil and / or leaves. Check regularly whether there is still moisture or ice in this container. At temperatures above 2 degrees, they do not go into hibernation. They will then live on their reserves. Doing nothing is not an option, I speak from experience. You can avoid these kinds of problems by keeping them fairly dry for much of the year.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Paige1warren:
    Hi guys! I’m new to this site and a new axolotl owner. I’ve had my baby (his name is toothpick) for about a month or so now. I finally got a water testing kit and I tested the perimeters earlier today. My ammonia was at 3 ppm and my nitrite was at 2 ppm. This freaked me out because I know they are supposed to be at 0 ppm. I did a water change a little bit ago and it went down to ammonia 1 ppm and in between 1-2 ppm nitrate. I change 50% of my water weekly and clean up any pieces of waste or excess food with a turkey bastwr everyday. Could this just be because the tank isn’t fully cycled yet? Should I be concerned? Toothpick hasn’t shown any signs of distress
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    @RG, yeah.. im a new owner and i thought just giving salt baths would work, Thank you so much for this tho!🤗
    +1
    Unlike
  • Pookisoo:
    Sorry again... but when i take him out is he supposed to be moving funny..? Sorry hahaha🤕
    +1
    Unlike
  • madcaplaughs:
    @Paige1warren You need to tub your axolotl and perform 100% daily water changes. Your tank is not fully cycled, and any readings of ammonia or nitrite are toxic and potentially deadly. A fully cycled tank should at all times have readings of 0ppm ammonia/0ppm nitrite/0pmm<nitrate.
    +1
    Unlike
    madcaplaughs: @Paige1warren You need to tub your axolotl and perform 100% daily water changes. Your tank is... +1
    Top