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LED Lighting Spectrums - help please

suztor

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All righty, I'm actually a little suprised that I haven't found any articles/ threads on using LED lighting since it's supposed to run cooler and last longer.

I have flourecent lights but they give off lots of heat and that just doesn't work for me. I'm looking into making my own LED lights (if the price doesn't go over what I can buy pre-built)

The BF is going to be helping me get all the wattage and all that sorted out (he studied electrical engineering and is handy with electronics and such)

What I'm having a hard time finding is for freshwater med to low light plants (the tank will be somewhat planted) what part of the color spectrum do I need to cover? and how do I find this information on LEDs?
I've been googling for two days on this and I'm having a hard time finding a straight answer. i. e.
Plants need ________to______ Spectrum
White LED made by ________ emits ________to ________ in the color spectrum
Red LED made by ________ emits ________to ________ in the color spectrum
Blue LED made by ________ emits ________to ________ in the color spectrum


also correct me if I'm wrong but I've read that Red spectrum is needed for flowering plants and Blue is needed for growing green plants.

when using White LEDs should I include other colors to fill in gaps in its spread and which colors should /would i need to use to do that.

Also I think I'm going to have a day and night setting which should be lots of fun to see :D

As for housing I will either use half a black PVC pipe or disassemble and paint an existing light fixture I don't like.
 

SludgeMunkey

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There are quite a few threads on here about LED lighting. You will need to adjust your search criteria.

I use a combination of LED and standard florescent. I was forced to do this as affordable LEDs that support plant growth do not exist. If plan on using full shade plants and mosses for terrestrial enclosures, you can get away with it, but growth is not optimal. For aquatics, it is best to stick with fluorescent in my opinion.


When it comes to LED "colors" be very very careful. What the actually emit and what you see are often two very different things. Also remember that light is not paint. To create "white" light you need the three standard primary colors and green. Even then, this is not true white light.

As for green, there currently no consumer grade true green LEDs available, just shades of blue that look green to the human eye. With white, true white LEDs are very, very expensive and last no longer than a flourescent. Most "white" LEDs are actually shades of blue or yellow. The few available that are true white either lack the intensity to support plants, or consume so much power and generate so much heat that fluorescent are a superior choice.

Since heat is an issue for you, LEDs are definitely not a superior option as consumer grade LEDs and their support electronics generate comparable heat to standard aquarium florescent when used in amounts that barely support plant growth.
 

keerthana06

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Apr 27, 2021
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miryalaguda
All righty, I'm actually a little suprised that I haven't found any articles/ threads on using LED lighting since it's supposed to run cooler and last longer.

I have flourecent lights but they give off lots of heat and that just doesn't work for me. I'm looking into making my own LED lights (if the price doesn't go over what I can buy pre-built)

The BF is going to be helping me get all the wattage and all that sorted out (he studied electrical engineering and is handy with electronics and such)

What I'm having a hard time finding is for freshwater med to low light plants (the tank will be somewhat planted) what part of the color spectrum do I need to cover? and how do I find this information on LEDs?
I've been googling for two days on this and I'm having a hard time finding a straight answer. i. e.
Plants need ________to______ Spectrum
White LED made by ________ emits ________to ________ in the color spectrum
Red LED made by ________ emits ________to ________ in the color spectrum
Blue LED made by ________ emits ________to ________ in the color spectrum


also correct me if I'm wrong but I've read that Red spectrum is needed for flowering plants and Blue is needed for growing green plants.

when using White LEDs should I include other colors to fill in gaps in its spread and which colors should /would i need to use to do that.

Also I think I'm going to have a day and night setting which should be lots of fun to see :D

As for
There are quite a few threads on here about LED lighting. You will need to adjust your search criteria.

I use a combination of LED and standard florescent. I was forced to do this as affordable LEDs that support plant growth do not exist. If plan on using full shade plants and mosses for terrestrial enclosures, you can get away with it, but growth is not optimal. For aquatics, it is best to stick with fluorescent in my opinion.


When it comes to LED "colors" be very very careful. What the actually emit and what you see are often two very different things. Also remember that light is not paint. To create "white" light you need the three standard primary colors and green. Even then, this is not true white light.

As for green, there currently no consumer grade true green LEDs available, just shades of blue that look green to the human eye. With white, true white LEDs are very, very expensive and last no longer than a flourescent. Most "white" LEDs are actually shades of blue or yellow. The few available that are true white either lack the intensity to support plants, or consume so much power and generate so much heat that fluorescent are a superior choice.

Since heat is an issue for you, LEDs are definitely not a superior option as consumer grade LEDs and their support electronics generate comparable heat to standard aquarium florescent when used in amounts that barely support plant growth.
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I will either use half a black PVC pipe or disassemble and paint an existing light fixture I don't l
 

keerthana06

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Takeoff Projects helps students regarding the topic LED lihgtning. You can learn from experts, build latest projects, showcase your project to the world and grab the best jobs. Get started today!
 

rishitharamesh01

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Tirupati
All righty, I'm actually a little suprised that I haven't found any articles/ threads on using LED lighting since it's supposed to run cooler and last longer.

I have flourecent lights but they give off lots of heat and that just doesn't work for me. I'm looking into making my own LED lights (if the price doesn't go over what I can buy pre-built)

The BF is going to be helping me get all the wattage and all that sorted out (he studied electrical engineering and is handy with electronics and such)

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  • FragileCorpse:
    Hey, my yellow spotted salamander has gotten a bit fat, he doesnt wanna move too much, and I notice he lays with his back legs flat out in front of him, but keeps his chest off the ground with his front legs. He CAN use his back legs to move around, but Im a little concerned about his back legs being flat out like that, and Im wondering snce he doesnt do a whole lot, will he lose function of his back legs? Kinda like a human would if they never used them? Also what is a slamander poop suppsoed to look like? I was told to spot clean poops and pees but after 4 months of feeding him and having him I havent ever seen a single thing I can identify s a poop...
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  • FragileCorpse:
    ...other than these little oblong shaped bits of dirt thats compacted together, I figure those must be poops because how else is the dirt getting compacted into an oblong shape like that? And he tends to roll those to his front entryway of his rock cave for me to move them away from the entrance. Are those poops? Mine will ONLY eat sal bugs. otherwise known as potato bugs, roly polys, etc. Hes never struck at anything else ive given him. Are the roly polys even enough nutrients for him? Ive captured like 400 of them for the winter months.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    When i lay a roly poly a bit far away from him, he WILLuse his back legs to come out, so he IS using them sometimes, its just concerning to see him with his legs flat out like that. Is that just normal for them?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    *also actually unsure of his sex, if the sex of the salamander means anything in this instance, I as told females are bigger and fatter, so I assume it might be a female tbh.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Please let me know if amyone knows amything, as I can not get adequate info anywhere else.
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  • SamAxolotl:
    @FragileCorpse, the chat room is a good way to get some basic answers. if you're looking for more detailed answers, go to caudata.org home page and then scroll down to newt and salamander help. I think you might be able to get some more answers from there from people with experience with newts/ salamanders specifically. you could probably also contact a breeder and see if they have advice for you. Some vets also have info on exotic animals as well. local wildlife centers/ rehab facilities/ rescues may also be a good resource to look into. hope your little guy feels better soon!
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  • FragileCorpse:
    I cant contact the vet or facilities because they keep trying to take my salamander and fine me cuz i dont have a permit. however i foudn him outside dying and nursed him back to health. So I need to be discreet about getting info. However, if anything actually becomes wrong with him, in order to save him I will have to surrender him to a vet. But thanks for the info I appreciate that
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  • FragileCorpse:
    We are about to be slammed by a category 4 hurricane. I need you guys to tell me how to saf ely transport my salamander. What kind of mobile go-terrarium can I make for him??? Can it be a plastic tote full of eco earth (cocount husk) and maybe his hidey rock and I can keep a spray bottle to keep him moist??? wtf do I do???? I have a bunch of his bugs in plastic containers thankfully so I can bring them with us. But he hates vibrations, trying to bring him out in a car or something is gonna be scary. Can these guys die of fright like a guinea pig can kind of deal???
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Maybe I should just go literally buy a smaller more mobile terrarium? Hes in a giant glass beast right now.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Man I wish I had more than one day to plan!!! My house wont even survive this!
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  • SamAxolotl:
    @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid (I've seen a lot of people keep reptiles etc in plastic tubs their whole lives happily) Not sure about the fear/ shock aspect, but maybe bring a towel or blanket to put over the tote (if it's a clear tote, that is) as well to keep it dark for him so he doesn't get spooked by so much movement that will be going on. I've used that for other animals and it seems to be effective for keeping them calm. See if you can get your hands on some earthworms for food. they're nutritionally dense and it looks like that's one of the main things your salamander would be fed in captivity. Crickets were another suggestion for food as well. praying you all stay safe!
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    SamAxolotl: @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid... +1
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