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Need help with Dicamptodon tenebrus larvae

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billie

Guest
Hello all, I have been given the task of raising 4 Pacific giant salamander larvae (Dicamptodon Tenebrus).. They were part of a Japan/Oregon biology study that is now over, but they must remain in captivity for life.. I get to attempt to make sure they live.. BUT I have no idea just exactly I am to do with them.

I have raised tiger sallies from larvae stage, so not a total newbee. I understand the basics. BUT can not find much info on temps, feedings, length of larvae stage, etc.

They are very small..2 are just getting back legs. So, I am assuming they are very young. I have them in a Sterile Environment(Plastic everything) no gravel, no live plants, no organic matterial(Fish and game requirements..as they may end up at State aquarium)

So, where do I begin?? What help is available to ask questions?? Not too many actually keep them..but this site is great, with great minds.

Any suggestions??

Billie
 

simon

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I don't exactly know about tenebrosus, but a similar species that I've encountered, D. copei lives in very cool (45-50 degrees F or so) streams, under rocks at the edges of small pools or in shallower stream sections. The water is moving at a slow-medium speed. All that would probably go for tenebrosus larvae too, although you will probably have to scale it all up once the larvae get big, ie. big rocks for them to hide under and a larger water body. They will probably eat any small aquatic invertebrate they can fit in their mouths, although I don't really know what they would eat exactly in the wild. Your larvae may remain larval (neotenic) their entire lives, but otherwise it will take them a long time to metamorphose; a few years plus.
Hope some of that helps, good luck
 
W

warren

Guest
There is an excellent section on foods for larval salamanders- I believe in the live foods section, but not exactly sure. If you are allowed to seine for live food, I would get a brine shrimp net and go to local waterways to get small invertebrates. As they get larger, they seem to prefer mayfly larva over anything else. You could also try tubifex or chopped bloodworms. Good luck!
 
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jennifer

Guest
This question was posted twice, so I deleted the other one. Your questions seem to be specific to Dicamptodon, so I think this section is better.

It's probably safest to keep them as cool as you can. And feed them as much as they will eat (preferably live food, so you don't have to do so much cleaning). But beyond that... hopefully some more folks with Dicamptodon experience will chime in.
 
B

billie

Guest
Thanks, the post was done twice on purpose.. Sorry about that, but there is so little posting here.. BUT I am glad someone saw it.. There is just not enough people keeping these guys..

Would it be safe to treat them like Axolotls..only cooler temps?? I can get much more information on them. AND as for native food, I will send the biologist who caught them out for "dinner"...

Thanks again..

Billie
 
W

warren

Guest
As long as you can keep the temps below 60 F degrees, they should be fine. I did observe my juvies (about 2-3") long eating frozen bloodworms, so you might try chopping some cubes into even smaller pieces for the tiny guys. Keep us posted.
 
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jennifer

Guest
I think "treat them like Axolotls" is a good idea. If you can get live blackworms, those would probably be ideal for getting them to grow.
 
B

billie

Guest
Thanks.. I got some frozen bloodworms and blackworms.. the little buggers took a little of each.. I may be getting 4 more of these larvae.. I will post pics as soon as I can. Kind of use this forum as a record book. That way I can record the growth and habits of a rarely kept species.. Good learning tool for me.

thanks again,

Billie
 

simon

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You are so lucky to get to keep tenebrosus.
alien.gif
 
R

rachel

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I noticed no one has posted here for a while. I was wondering how the little guys are doing...
 

TJ

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I've lower-cased the NEED HELP in the thread title as shouting is discouraged on the forum ... or at least I think it's discouraged ...or at least I discourage it
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