Ph of Pleurodeles waltl in native range?

Pudmuppy

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I've been having a look around but can't seem to find the answer - does anyone know what range of PH is found in their native habitats?

I'm going to be rescaping my guys' tanks and thought it might be amusing to make a blackwater-ish set up, or at least something reasonably natural and interesting for them. (I am aware that a lot of them are found in mud-filled, dark ponds with little to no scaping, but humor me!)

I suspect that they don't really care, or are probably found in a neutral to higher PH, but thought I would ask just in case lowering the PH might cause issues with them or their spawn. I may just make a blackwater style set up without the actual blackwater, but if anyone knows the answer it would be greatly appreciated.
 

Jensino

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I'm sorry to tell you that their natural habitats have not much in common with a typical blackwater biotope.
They live mostly in open dry grasslands with sandy or rocky bottoms, that are periodically flooded. The water is clear and not colored by tannins or humic substances.
Sometimes they occur in sparse pine forests with slightly acidic soil.
Due to the arid nature of their habitats these newts are not picky when choosing a water body. But whenever possible they prefer densely planted ponds (e. g. flooded meadows).

In captivity a pH range from 5 to 8 should be reasonable and any submersed plants would be highly appreciated.
An actual Iwagumi with Eleocharis species and a few rocks for hiding would be closer to their natural habitat than a blackwater aquascape. :happy:
 

Pudmuppy

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I'm sorry to tell you that their natural habitats have not much in common with a typical blackwater biotope.
They live mostly in open dry grasslands with sandy or rocky bottoms, that are periodically flooded. The water is clear and not colored by tannins or humic substances.
Sometimes they occur in sparse pine forests with slightly acidic soil.
Due to the arid nature of their habitats these newts are not picky when choosing a water body. But whenever possible they prefer densely planted ponds (e. g. flooded meadows).

In captivity a pH range from 5 to 8 should be reasonable and any submersed plants would be highly appreciated.
An actual Iwagumi with Eleocharis species and a few rocks for hiding would be closer to their natural habitat than a blackwater aquascape. :happy:

Thanks Jensino! I had wondered if I was trying to force a biope on them! They are currently on sand with rocks and a few small branches, Java fern so I might just see how other hardier plants do with them instead, thank you!
 
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