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Replicating D. Tenebrosus Moving Water

AquaticEngineer

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So I guess I have it pretty easy as far as a visual reference to replicate since I've found them in the stream right next to my house.

Just curious if others have created a replica habitat for them before with fast moving chilled water?

Thinking of copying the design shown here on fluvals website for making a "river" aquarium but with the addition of a canister filter ran through a small chiller.

Thoughts? Comments? Tips from those who have done it?

gallery_5_figure-1_a_498x280.jpg


gallery_6_figure-1_b_498x280.jpg
 

sde

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Hi,

Interesting idea. Seems like it could work well. I made a tank for Dicamptodon that i didn't end up using ( didn't get anything to put in it ) but i will add a (bad) picture of it. I had it in a internal filter rated for 40 gallons on it with a 170 GPH flow rate along with a bad HOB, but would have added another pump to the setup if i got any animals for the tank. It was in a unheated shed so cooling wasn't a problem. Just stacked rocks, terracotta pots, and some wood.
If i made it again i would put the tank outside, put a nice big pump on it, and try to recreate a plunge pool by either using a slanted glass pane ( with a gap underneath ) or a log. I will add a picture of the kind of plunge pool i am talking about below as well. The water goes over the top of the log then falls a bit, pushing out substrate creating a cavity underneath the log, which would be a potential egg deposit site.

Anyway that's a very cool idea with the glass pane and such. I think it would work quite well. Since you have access to their habitat i am sure you have a pretty good idea of how to setup the tank.
Let me know how it turns out!
 

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AquaticEngineer

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I'm kind of stuck on what size tank and setup to use though :(

I'm really leaning towards doing a 22 long ADA glass tank with a canister filter and round river rocks with maybe a single submerged log like what I find them under in the creek. This setup would only be for them as aquatic juveniles.

I have an established semi aquatic riverbank vivarium that is wintering over on my porch that used to house my T.grans which I'll likely use for the giants when they morph.

Also found this very clever design online!
4f7037c89ce4a.jpg
 
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jewett

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That is very clever! I have been looking into river designs for my Pachytriton and both of these ideas are great. With whatever method you choose I wish you the best of luck!

And thanks for posting these - I am very excited at trying especially the second one.

HJ
 

slowfoot

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My friend in grad school created a river-type aquarium for tailed frogs (from the same habitat as Dicamptodon). It was basically a long, thin tank (55 gallon, I think) with a series of glass or pvc panels siliconed in a sort of stair-step fashion so the water cascaded into each pool. It was powered by a pond pump, I think, and had rocks kind of stacked up so the animals could move up the pools if they wanted.

Here's a silly diagram (I didn't put the rocks in):
2nuuiht.jpg
 

sde

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I'm kind of stuck on what size tank and setup to use though

I would say it entirely depends on the number of animals you are going to put in it. I would also try and provide plenty of room for each individual, as they can be quite aggressive towards each other and are known to be cannibalistic. I once saw a larvae D. tenebrosus attempting to eat another larvae that was similar in size, it was quite ferocious.

I'm really leaning towards doing a 22 long ADA glass tank with a canister filter and round river rocks with maybe a single submerged log like what I find them under in the creek. This setup would only be for them as aquatic juveniles.

Sounds like a good setup to me.
 

curtpw

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I'm kind of stuck on what size tank and setup to use though :(

I'm really leaning towards doing a 22 long ADA glass tank with a canister filter and round river rocks with maybe a single submerged log like what I find them under in the creek. This setup would only be for them as aquatic juveniles.

I have an established semi aquatic riverbank vivarium that is wintering over on my porch that used to house my T.grans which I'll likely use for the giants when they morph.

Also found this very clever design online!
4f7037c89ce4a.jpg
FYI to anyone reading this thread, Dicamptodon T. will not morph if they don't have anything to climb up on or something of the sort. This has been studied several times. See attached papers.
 

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Creekratt

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FYI to anyone reading this thread, Dicamptodon T. will not morph if they don't have anything to climb up on or something of the sort. This has been studied several times. See attached papers.
Thank you,very nice to know!
 
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Hey, my yellow spotted salamander has gotten a bit fat, he doesnt wanna move too much, and I notice he lays with his back legs flat out in front of him, but keeps his chest off the ground with his front legs. He CAN use his back legs to move around, but Im a little concerned about his back legs being flat out like that, and Im wondering snce he doesnt do a whole lot, will he lose function of his back legs? Kinda like a human would if they never used them? Also what is a slamander poop suppsoed to look like? I was told to spot clean poops and pees but after 4 months of feeding him and having him I havent ever seen a single thing I can identify s a poop...
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    ...other than these little oblong shaped bits of dirt thats compacted together, I figure those must be poops because how else is the dirt getting compacted into an oblong shape like that? And he tends to roll those to his front entryway of his rock cave for me to move them away from the entrance. Are those poops? Mine will ONLY eat sal bugs. otherwise known as potato bugs, roly polys, etc. Hes never struck at anything else ive given him. Are the roly polys even enough nutrients for him? Ive captured like 400 of them for the winter months.
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    When i lay a roly poly a bit far away from him, he WILLuse his back legs to come out, so he IS using them sometimes, its just concerning to see him with his legs flat out like that. Is that just normal for them?
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    *also actually unsure of his sex, if the sex of the salamander means anything in this instance, I as told females are bigger and fatter, so I assume it might be a female tbh.
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    Please let me know if amyone knows amything, as I can not get adequate info anywhere else.
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    @FragileCorpse, the chat room is a good way to get some basic answers. if you're looking for more detailed answers, go to caudata.org home page and then scroll down to newt and salamander help. I think you might be able to get some more answers from there from people with experience with newts/ salamanders specifically. you could probably also contact a breeder and see if they have advice for you. Some vets also have info on exotic animals as well. local wildlife centers/ rehab facilities/ rescues may also be a good resource to look into. hope your little guy feels better soon!
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  • FragileCorpse:
    I cant contact the vet or facilities because they keep trying to take my salamander and fine me cuz i dont have a permit. however i foudn him outside dying and nursed him back to health. So I need to be discreet about getting info. However, if anything actually becomes wrong with him, in order to save him I will have to surrender him to a vet. But thanks for the info I appreciate that
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  • FragileCorpse:
    We are about to be slammed by a category 4 hurricane. I need you guys to tell me how to saf ely transport my salamander. What kind of mobile go-terrarium can I make for him??? Can it be a plastic tote full of eco earth (cocount husk) and maybe his hidey rock and I can keep a spray bottle to keep him moist??? wtf do I do???? I have a bunch of his bugs in plastic containers thankfully so I can bring them with us. But he hates vibrations, trying to bring him out in a car or something is gonna be scary. Can these guys die of fright like a guinea pig can kind of deal???
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    Maybe I should just go literally buy a smaller more mobile terrarium? Hes in a giant glass beast right now.
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    Man I wish I had more than one day to plan!!! My house wont even survive this!
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    @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid (I've seen a lot of people keep reptiles etc in plastic tubs their whole lives happily) Not sure about the fear/ shock aspect, but maybe bring a towel or blanket to put over the tote (if it's a clear tote, that is) as well to keep it dark for him so he doesn't get spooked by so much movement that will be going on. I've used that for other animals and it seems to be effective for keeping them calm. See if you can get your hands on some earthworms for food. they're nutritionally dense and it looks like that's one of the main things your salamander would be fed in captivity. Crickets were another suggestion for food as well. praying you all stay safe!
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    SamAxolotl: @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid... +1
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