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Salamanders of the Old World by Max Sparreboom

Methos5K

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I received this title for Christmas and wanted to do a quick write up. Truly a tome of knowledge of all Salamander species in the Old World. The original book published in French, Robert Thorn's classic 1968 text, "Les Salamandres" was considered the standard. Behold the new authoritative, definitive book on the subject. Europe, Middle-east, Africa and Asia are all covered.

At 430 pages, this book is huge. Richly illustrated with all color photographs of each species and subspecies (both sexes); as well as habitats, breeding/courting behavior and detailed maps of the geographical range of each salamander. Animals with complex mating/courtship rituals have detailed step-by-step drawings/photos of the whole sequence. Amazing stuff.

Each species contains the following entries:
1) Description (complete physical information
2) Diagnosis (information on how to differentiate between similar species)
3) Eggs and larvae (descriptions)
4) Distribution ( geographical range)
5) Habitat (detailed information on their natural environment)
6) Behavior (species-specific general information)
7) Threats and conservation (very specific information about environmental threats, as well as legal legislation/conservation laws, i.e. protected in home country)
8) Observations in captivity (Difficulty in keeping and breeding)
9) Comments (Yes, even more information, of topics ranging from taxonomy to university/zoological notes)
10) References (individual sources of published/referenced material

The entire volume is cross-referenced to just about every single article/journal/book published in every language in the known universe. It retails for $160 US, but it is of the utmost quality. Thick, durable binding with quality paper. It is now the crown jewel of my always expanding salamander library.

Now can we get a companion volume for the New World? Please? ;)



ISBN-13: 978-9050114851
ISBN-10: 9050114857






 
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philj

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If you are looking for something comparable to this book for new world salamanders, salamanders of the united states and canada by james petranka is an excellent book :)

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Methos5K

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If you are looking for something comparable to this book for new world salamanders, salamanders of the united states and canada by james petranka is an excellent book :)

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Picked that up. I love it. Now can you recommend a book covering central and south american salamanders? I'm finding precious little, mostly scientific reports in pdf formats in university websites.
 

philj

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I know exactly what you are talking about. in terms of books covering just south/central american caudates i havent seen anything, just papers. Ive had my eye on amphibians of central america by Gunther Kohler. Ive read some good reviews but as the title says its all amphibians and not just caudates (dont know whether thats a problem for you or not). If you do get it let me know how it is! Other than that theres a several captive care books which cover a few bolitoglossa species...





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FrogEyes

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There's a new book on amphibians and reptiles of the border states of Mexico and USA, with chapters on each state. I haven't yet bought it, but a number of bolitoglossines and Ambystoma, plus a couple other rarely-reported salamanders occur in those Mexican states.
 

caleb

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Ive had my eye on amphibians of central america by Gunther Kohler. Ive read some good reviews but as the title says its all amphibians and not just caudates (dont know whether thats a problem for you or not). If you do get it let me know how it is!

I was slightly disappointed that Kohler's book doesn't include all of Mexico- it covers Panama to the far south-east of Mexico. If you want a sneaky preview, there is a (poorly scanned) pdf version you might be able to find.
 
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  • PvH:
    Hi
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  • PvH:
    I've advertised my CB alpine newts for sale UK but no offers so far. I'm looking for a carer/enthusiast so I put a price to deter people who might not be serious about the responsibilities of the undertaking but how do I find a genuine enthusiast who will take over care? I'm not looking for money, just a good home for the newts.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Hey guys, its way too hot where I live right now. Temperatures 40 degree celcius outside, making it like 30 degrees inside. Ive got ice packs on my yellow spotted salamanders hidey rock, he acts like he hates it though. Am I keeping him too cold? I think my temp gauge might be messed up, or at least in the wrong spot. I put the tank temp gauge in the top left corner of his large tank, where it says its 80 degrees fahrenheit, which I am aware is too hot, which is what makes me put the ice packs on his rock at the bottom of the cage, but the bottom of his cage feels a lot cooler tha 80 degrees. Should I move my temp gauge down to the bottom corner where he hangs out the most? Should I get a soil temperature probe so I can tell what temperature the soil that hes laying on is?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Because his soil is certainly not 80 degrees fahrenheit, and I dont want to freeze the poor bugger with ice packs if he really doesnt need them. Hes been doing fine, but Im just so stressed because I cant get ANy information on how to handle this little guy. Theyre illegal to keep without a permit, but this one would not have survived without my intervention. So I cant call and ask anyone for help. If theres a betetr site than this one, I sure havent found it. But I never get any replies here. We are all just asking questions and getting none answered basically. Its really frustrating as I just want to help this little dude be happy and healthy. All I can get him to eat is potato bugs as well. I cant find anything else that he will eat. Is that even okay? :/ hes been eating strictly those since may first.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Does ANYONE know of a site more active than this where I can get my questions answered? My little bud needs help and Im just not getting it here.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Alright well I bought a bunch of stuff for his tank and hope it helps. Im getting extremelty frustrated that bI cant get an answer. Guess buddies just gonna have to die or some shit. like wtf why cant I get any help.
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  • Captive Bread:
    I'm afraid this is the largest and most active community for this kind of information, probably on the entire internet. That said, we are still small overall. We can't help you all of the time. We do offer you support and have answered your questions in the past so I feel it's very impolite to lose patience with us.
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  • Captive Bread:
    Second of all, was you who said you wild caught your salamander? And had Authorities threaten to retrieve it from you?
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  • Captive Bread:
    Third of all, assuming thats the case, no one seems to want to face the reality that these animals come from climates and microenvironments where they need to be kept cool. If you can't hack, then release it where you pulled it from.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    he was dying outside. SO SORRY i was nice enough to save him. can i even release him in wetaher thats 40 degree celcius? will he not just die outside because he cant dig through the hard ground?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    The ONLY reason I spent 500 dollars on this thing was to keep him alive. thats IT. He was completely dry with cracked skin and couldnt walk and I nursed him back to health. Now I should just throw him outside on the hard baked ground where I found him? in my driveway? Really dude?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    I am losing patienc ebecause I care. Because I cant get any answers in any length of time that will actually benefit him. He'll only eat potato bugs, I just want him to have good rest of his life. Thats IT. So dont act like I went out an dillegally trapped some poor salamander out of the wild for fun cuz I wanted one.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    I am very sure he was just trying to pass by, because he certainly cant dig ANYWHERE in the soil ANYWHERE near where I live. So I cannot just release him in 40 degree celcius on the super hard baked ground where theres no shelter and no food and now ater to be seen for miles. I dont see how that wioll help him at all.
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  • John:
    @FragileCorpse, Watch your language please.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    What did I say sorry? What word?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Sorry youre going to have to explain to me john becaue Ive reread what I wrote here and Im not seeing it,
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Ill certainly apologize for using it, but to not use it I need to know what it is is all.
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    Hello all
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    What's the night shift looking like
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  • Captive Bread:
    Lots of contemplating life for me. What about you?
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  • ShawnJPN:
    Same thoughts reduced to bytes on a website
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    ShawnJPN: Same thoughts reduced to bytes on a website +1
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