Status of the Salamander Hobby?

Tinc Tank

New member
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
Messages
9
Reaction score
8
Points
3
Location
Ohio, USA
Country
United States
New member here! I have not necessarily been a part of the newt and salamander hobby per se, but I did spend a significant portion of my childhood admiring them and searching for them in the woods. Currently I am dart frog keeper with a significant collection in my care. But I have always wanted salamanders and particularly the Salamandra ssp. And therein lies my problem. I remember several years ago all the foreign species were banned from importation into the country, so whatever we have now is what we will ever have. So my question(s) is how vast is the hobby? Is the hobby still hurting from these regulations? And are the foreign species too rare at this point to last very long?

I am hoping some of the older salamander keepers can chime in and inform me on their thoughts about the current status of the salamander hobby. I will appreciate any of your thoughts!
 
Last edited:

JM29

Active member
Joined
Nov 16, 2009
Messages
324
Reaction score
36
Points
28
Location
Brittany
Country
France
You are asking the great, right question.
In Europe, we have practically the same concerns, and the answer can be very different depending on the species.
 

Blop

New member
Joined
Jan 29, 2020
Messages
4
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Texas
Country
United States
Funny enough, I'm not really sure if the paddletail newts were ever banned from importation
 

YGDS

New member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
13
Reaction score
3
Points
3
Location
Calgary
Country
Canada
Here in Canada, we've got real issues, but the legislation in place banning importation is actually quite sensible given the massive dangers Bsal poses to native species. I've only had my finger on the pulse of this for a few months, but you are in a much more favourable position depending on your State laws, than many other places, simply by virtue of being in the US. While there are rumours and whispers on the wind that will likely end the hobby for good in the near future (a blatant warning posted here in the forum, if you're stateside, do your part to prevent this), for the present, you shouldn't have too much of an issue acquiring a few species stateside.
 
Last edited:

Thanassi07

New member
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
Messages
8
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Massachusetts
Country
United States
I got into the hobby recently after the ban soI don't have much reference before, but the hobby is still most certainly active though most species are hard if not virtually impossible to obtain.
 

Tinc Tank

New member
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
Messages
9
Reaction score
8
Points
3
Location
Ohio, USA
Country
United States
I got into the hobby recently after the ban soI don't have much reference before, but the hobby is still most certainly active though most species are hard if not virtually impossible to obtain.
That is what it is looking like to me too. Like I know of literally only one guy breeding fire salamanders.
 

Thanassi07

New member
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
Messages
8
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Massachusetts
Country
United States
That is what it is looking like to me too. Like I know of literally only one guy breeding fire salamanders.
I know what you mean, I know like 5-6 fire sal breeders. I'm more interested in US native species like Aneides, Eurycea, Plethodon, Desmogs, etc. than European/Asian Newts and Fire salamanders that everyone is concerned with.
 

Tinc Tank

New member
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
Messages
9
Reaction score
8
Points
3
Location
Ohio, USA
Country
United States
I know what you mean, I know like 5-6 fire sal breeders. I'm more interested in US native species like Aneides, Eurycea, Plethodon, Desmogs, etc. than European/Asian Newts and Fire salamanders that everyone is concerned with.
I am interested in more breeders. I would appreciate if maybe you could share some with me via PM or maybe any Facebook groups they may be hanging around in.

But yeah, the US native species seem rare to find captive bred, probably because of their seasonal temperature requirements.
 

Thanassi07

New member
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
Messages
8
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Location
Massachusetts
Country
United States
I am interested in more breeders. I would appreciate if maybe you could share some with me via PM or maybe any Facebook groups they may be hanging around in.

But yeah, the US native species seem rare to find captive bred, probably because of their seasonal temperature requirements.
Actually, it's due to many restrictions as well as many people are against wild collecting native species. You can shoot me a message on FB (My name Thanassi Karasoulos, same profile pic as the one I use for Caudata).
 
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • differencess:
    Daphnia water fleas, mosquito larvae and any larve will do
    +1
    Unlike
  • Lilith:
    Ok Thank You. ^-^
    +1
    Unlike
  • Austin Wayneg:
    I just got a tiger salamander and it's not eating
    +1
    Unlike
  • ArpTheAxolotl:
    Congrats. D6
    +1
    Unlike
  • SubZero:
    What are you feeding it
    +2
    Unlike
  • Austin Wayneg:
    Red worms
    +1
    Unlike
  • Audrey22:
    Try various foods to mimic a natural diet. If your worms are dead, try living things for sure. My newts prefer live food almost exclusively. My eastern newts eat snails, black worms, baby brine and others. They are like picky children. Maybe blood worms are their broccoli lol
    +1
    Unlike
  • rads:
    Hey there guys! My tank is cycled but I'm still battling ammonia spikes just when I get it down to zero. I keep the tank clean and do water changes when needed to lower it. Ammonia is about .25-.5 right now, 0 nitrite, 20 nitrate ppm. Not sure why two months in now it's still fluctuating?
    +1
    Unlike
  • xxianxx:
    @axolotl nerd, rads, the cycle has crashed or the tank wasnt fully cycled to start with. Remove the animals to a seperate tank or tub, give 100% daily water changes. It can take a while to cycle a tank if its yr first time.
    +2
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has joined the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Toothpickthelotl:
    Hey guys! We had our first unexpected hot day and I was an idiot and forgot to put on the fan for my axolotl tank. When I came to feed her at around 7, I noticed the tank was 75 degrees!! It has never been this warm, it’s always a stable 67ish without a fan. It was only this warm for today (yesterday it was normal temps), and I immeditately got the fan on when I saw. It is down to 69 degrees now. Is my axie going to be ok with the increase in temperature for a day?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Toothpickthelotl:
    Oh that’s in Fahrenheit by the way, I think in Celsius it almost got up to 24 c if I’m not mistaken
    +1
    Unlike
  • Toothpickthelotl:
    Axie is showing no signs of stress whatsoever
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has joined the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • xxianxx:
    A short temp spike is unlikely to cause any long term probs
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has joined the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has joined the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    xxianxx has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • gemdimps:
    Hi 👋🏻 I am desperately seeking cycling advice
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    NewtPoot has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    RCWaterPets has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
    Chat Bot: RCWaterPets has left the room. +1
    Top