Caudata.org: Newts and Salamanders Portal

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!
Did you know that registered users see fewer ads? Register today!

Water Hyacinth

VoodooJackal

New member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Location
NH
Has anyone had any experience using water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) in an aquarium setup. Are they newt safe?
 

FrogEyes

Active member
Joined
Sep 5, 2010
Messages
908
Reaction score
38
Location
Southern Minnesota
This is a plant commonly associated with sirens...

Your issue isn't really salamander safety, but plant safety. This is a tropical floating plant which gets blasted by the sun. You need strong plant lights for it to survive indoors.
 

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
73
Location
Chesterfield, England
I've been growing these indoors for nearly 4 years now in all my aquatic/semi aquatic tanks.
They do like plenty of light but mine have been fine with a single growlux tube and still grow at temps down to 60F. The only thing they don't do is flower but they reproduce with runners so quickly i end up giving them away!
Once they get established they make a nice floating mat for newts to haul out on and most of them sleep in the root system just below the surface.
 

Attachments

  • water plants 028.jpg
    water plants 028.jpg
    118.2 KB · Views: 22,712
  • water plants 023.jpg
    water plants 023.jpg
    67.2 KB · Views: 6,351

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
73
Location
Chesterfield, England
After having these growing permanently indoors for nearly 5 years i swapped my lighting to a modern LED units, the rest of the plants in the tanks have thrived but the water hyacinths have really suffered. The new growth is stunted and leaves are turning brown. Strangely, the water lettuce is doing better than ever so i don't know why the hyacinths hate the LED lighting so much?
 

Bette

New member
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
975
Reaction score
17
Location
Massachusetts, USA
I wanted to bump this thread because I am looking for an update on how China dog's water hyacinths are doing. Are they still alive under the led lights? If so, how many watts are the led lights you are using?
I have some salvinia, water lettace, and water hyacinths coming in the mail next week, and i am really hoping that I can keep them alive!
 

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
73
Location
Chesterfield, England
The Hyacinths slowly died off, they just didn't like the led lights. I suspect it was the radiant heat from the old fluorescent bulbs that they couldn't do without, also, I have cooling fans running almost permanently in the summer, so maybe they were chilled by those.
Water lettuce, Amazon frogbit and Duckweed are all doing well enough though, so at least I have some floating plants in there.
Sorry for the slow reply, I've been away for a few days. :)
 

Attachments

  • SAM_5903.jpg
    SAM_5903.jpg
    154.9 KB · Views: 570
  • SAM_5901.jpg
    SAM_5901.jpg
    112.7 KB · Views: 862

Bette

New member
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
975
Reaction score
17
Location
Massachusetts, USA
The Hyacinths slowly died off, they just didn't like the led lights. I suspect it was the radiant heat from the old fluorescent bulbs that they couldn't do without, also, I have cooling fans running almost permanently in the summer, so maybe they were chilled by those.
Water lettuce, Amazon frogbit and Duckweed are all doing well enough though, so at least I have some floating plants in there.
Sorry for the slow reply, I've been away for a few days. :)

Thanks so much for the update! I'll stick to the fluorescent bulbs for them.
 

willowcat

New member
Joined
Jul 26, 2012
Messages
202
Reaction score
8
Location
Minnesota, U.S.A.
I've been growing these indoors for nearly 4 years now in all my aquatic/semi aquatic tanks.
They do like plenty of light but mine have been fine with a single growlux tube and still grow at temps down to 60F. The only thing they don't do is flower but they reproduce with runners so quickly i end up giving them away!
Once they get established they make a nice floating mat for newts to haul out on and most of them sleep in the root system just below the surface.

Just a thought about the Growlux tube or other tubes you may be using. Is there a chance that this particular plant likes light in a different spectrum? I grow phytoplankton for my daphnia. The research that I found states that the red and blue light spectrum is the best for aquatic plant life. That is around 5000 Kelvin. I had a bunch of aquarium lights that I bought from a shop going out of business. They stated that the lights were 'great' for growing plants because the light says Full Daylight. These are rated at 8000K. I looked at a Growlux bulb and there is no information on the box describing the Kelvin measurement. So I called Sylvania and asked customer service what the rating was. She couldn't tell me, but said she would email me a chart with all their product ratings. The information that she sent me tells me all the Kelvin ratings except for the Grolux tube. So I turned on the different lights that I owned, including the new Grolux bulb and looked at the bulbs, noticing that there is quite a difference in the hues that the bulbs put off. I also noticed on the bulbs that they say replace yearly. I wonder if they inform us to replace the bulb because possibly the bulb looses something??? So I wonder if your bulbs have lost something that this particular plant needs or maybe this plant doesn't like a Full Daylight bulb, "if that is what you are using". I know that outdoor plants and trees differ in the amount of light they can tolerate.
 

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
73
Location
Chesterfield, England
They were happy enough for five years with all kinds of fluorescent bulbs, It was the LED fixture that they couldn't live with. I guess I used the term Growlux as a generic term for aquatic plant bulbs, but I do know what you mean about the different colour glow from similar spec bulbs.
As I understand it, the spectrum gradually deteriorates with age in these types of bulb and the manufacturer can only guarantee the output will be within the stated spec for a certain amount of hours. This is especially noticeable with bulbs for UV sterilisers, they will still emit visible light for years, but they stop killing algae after about eight months.
I've also come across seemingly incurable algae problems in freshwater tanks where the nitrate and phosphate levels are where they should be, the eventual problems turned out to be old light tubes, the algae completely burnt itself out and vanished on both occasions after new light tubes were fitted.
 

Bette

New member
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
975
Reaction score
17
Location
Massachusetts, USA
Its all very interesting. Well, so far I've been using two extra aquarium hood lights that are supposed to house full spectrum fluorescent tubes in each. The overall light they emit has a warm purple hue. The plants seem to love it so far! They look better than when they arrived, so that's good.
 
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • Jokerjay:
    My son and I have been looking for a water dog/tiger salamander for quite some time now with no luck has anybody know how or where to find any
    +1
    Unlike
  • Jokerjay:
    @axolotl nerd, where can I find waterdogs or tiger salamanders my son has wanted one for a long time and I've been searching high and low with no luck
    +1
    Unlike
  • xxianxx:
    @Jokerjay, its a good idea to tell people where you are from. This is an international group. I have eastern tigers, im in the uk.
    +1
    Unlike
  • axolotl nerd:
    @Jokerjay, as in water dogs do you mean axolotls? i suggest very heavy research and a fully cycled tank before even considering purchasing one
    +1
    Unlike
  • bearbear_13:
    Axolotls are amazing until they get sick and then they’re a pain in the backside to treat - I recently lost two axolotls due to unknown causes
    +1
    Unlike
  • KonaGoldAquatics:
    Anyone from the us? Looking for at least one or two axolotls for me and my son to have our own at-home project together.
    +1
    Unlike
  • axolotl nerd:
    i highly recommend “buyanaxolotl.com”- ive purchased from them and received a beautiful animal for relatively cheap, in great condition, and excellent shipping precautions. the breeders are a couple living in georgia (i believe, don’t quite remember) and they’re fantastic. sometimes their website contact page doesn’t work, so i’d probably try just emailing them. good luck and happy hunting!
    +1
    Unlike
  • blubford:
    do those aquarium fans work well for axolotls
    +1
    Unlike
  • Sheryl Fraser:
    My little guy got stuck in the filter yesterday. His back leg is red. Will this heal
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    Z-One has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • KonaGoldAquatics:
    Any recommendations on a water chiller for a 10gallon but will work for a 20gal when I decide to upgrade?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Tinc Tank:
    Anybody working with and breeding Salamandra salamandra salamandra?
    +2
    Unlike
  • blubford:
    heh
    +1
    Unlike
  • Alexmcc:
    Hi all I'm new here I'm just looking some advise on cycle witch is currently driving me insane . So we are week 8 I'm dosing daily with 4pp of amonia and for the last week has been dropping to zero witch I no is good. But my question is my nitrites are sitting at between 0.50 and 1.0 PM and nitrates are between 10 and 20 and neither of these seem to be dropping. I have done 2 40% water changes a few days ago and no change the only thing I can think of is I didnt use the seachem stability stuff which I have now ordered but surely that shouldn't have much difference this far into cycling
    +1
    Unlike
  • ytz13513:
    Dropping ammonia with rising nitrate and nitrite is good. It means the nitrifying bacteria is working. You just have to remove the nitrate from the water doing water changes. The level of nitrates is high and the nitrate is also high. The nitrite will be converted to nitrate using the beneficial bacteria and you can add them using quick start or allowing them to naturally grow in the tank. The latter option will take longer. The nitrate can be used by plants, so live plants can decrease the levels, but I would do a water change to get the nitrate at a level that is lower than 5 ppm. 5ppm of nitrate is natural and a good place.
    +1
    Unlike
  • EvankingM:
    New here. hope this is the right place to post my question. I had 27 axolotyls aged 2-3 months old. main food has been finely chopped up bloodworms. no problems. I decided to introduce earthworms from my earthworm compost bin for variety. I finely chopped up 4 small earthworms and fed them to the babies. Within an hour 20 of the babies were dead. The remaining 7 (the smaller babies) survived and are now fine on bloodworms. Any ideas why the chopped up earthworms killed many of the babies?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    Lyv3wyr3 has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • blubford:
    oh wow this place got a makeover
    +1
    Unlike
  • John:
    Yeah baby!
    CalculatingEducatedKingfisher-size_restricted.gif
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    John has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    John has joined the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Bellabelloo:
    Looks really good. 😊
    +1
    Unlike
  • blubford:
    i agree
    +1
    Unlike
  • BrodieBAxolotls:
    love the new look
    +1
    Unlike
  • noahc808:
    does anyone know if fairy shrimp are good to use with axolotls?
    +1
    Unlike
    noahc808: does anyone know if fairy shrimp are good to use with axolotls? +1
    Top