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Wildlife pond in the north Appenninies

Giacomo

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Hi guys!
I just wanted to show you my small wildlife pond i made near my house in the northern Appenninies (near Bologna) at 450 meters above sea level.
Actually, i have introduced some local plants, like Iris pseudocorus, Vallisneria spiralis, Alisma plantago-aquatica, Ceratophyllum submersum.
About amphibians, lots of species arrived in there. As you know, here in Italy one of the major conservation problem of them is the drought and heat that are increasing year by year due to climate change. So, a small pond like the one I made, can make the different for the amphibians populations.
Actually, the species i saw in there are: italian smooth newt (Lissotriton v. meridionalis), italian alpine newt (I.alpestris apuana), italian crested newt (T.carnifex), common toad (not so common here anymore.. Bufo bufo), agile frog (Rana dalmatina) and pool frog complex (Pelophylax kl. esculentus and Pelophylax lessonae)*

*This last one frog species complex is really threatened here due to the introduced of invasive species from balkan (Pelophylax ridibundus complex) with the ability to hybridize with local species leading to their disappearance.
Let me know what do you think, and any suggestions are higly appreciated!

Giacomo
 

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JM29

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Very good idea.

Since most of these species spend only part of the year in the pond, you could try to increase the number of hides around the pond.
In spite of the fact they can move within 500 meters around the breeding pond, most newts will stay within 20 meters or so.
 

Giacomo

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Very good idea.

Since most of these species spend only part of the year in the pond, you could try to increase the number of hides around the pond.
In spite of the fact they can move within 500 meters around the breeding pond, most newts will stay within 20 meters or so.
Thank you! I've never thought about that!
Maybe because near the pond there is a small piece of deciduous wood exposed to North, so always fresh and cool during the summer period, but despite that i think I must increase the hides around the pond anyway.
May you give me some ideas? I was thinking about dead woods, rocks, tiles and maybe some bushes (like privet or hawthorn?). But if you have some pics, i'll be happy to get inspired by them!
 

JM29

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I was thinking about dead woods, rocks, tiles and maybe some bushes (like privet or hawthorn?).
All of these are good.
Dead wood (large pieces) is generally preferred by Amphibians compared to rocks but piles of medium sized pebbles can be exploited.
Tiles can also be useful as they provide a large surface on the soil, which should be coarse.

Unfortunately I've no photo to show you.
I think you can compose something interesting and esthetic with objects of your choice.
Cover objects (wood, rocks, tiles,...) should be shaded by bushes or trees to be convenient for Amphibians.
If they are in full sun, they'll be better home for reptiles.
 
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Hey, my yellow spotted salamander has gotten a bit fat, he doesnt wanna move too much, and I notice he lays with his back legs flat out in front of him, but keeps his chest off the ground with his front legs. He CAN use his back legs to move around, but Im a little concerned about his back legs being flat out like that, and Im wondering snce he doesnt do a whole lot, will he lose function of his back legs? Kinda like a human would if they never used them? Also what is a slamander poop suppsoed to look like? I was told to spot clean poops and pees but after 4 months of feeding him and having him I havent ever seen a single thing I can identify s a poop...
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  • FragileCorpse:
    ...other than these little oblong shaped bits of dirt thats compacted together, I figure those must be poops because how else is the dirt getting compacted into an oblong shape like that? And he tends to roll those to his front entryway of his rock cave for me to move them away from the entrance. Are those poops? Mine will ONLY eat sal bugs. otherwise known as potato bugs, roly polys, etc. Hes never struck at anything else ive given him. Are the roly polys even enough nutrients for him? Ive captured like 400 of them for the winter months.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    When i lay a roly poly a bit far away from him, he WILLuse his back legs to come out, so he IS using them sometimes, its just concerning to see him with his legs flat out like that. Is that just normal for them?
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  • FragileCorpse:
    *also actually unsure of his sex, if the sex of the salamander means anything in this instance, I as told females are bigger and fatter, so I assume it might be a female tbh.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Please let me know if amyone knows amything, as I can not get adequate info anywhere else.
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  • SamAxolotl:
    @FragileCorpse, the chat room is a good way to get some basic answers. if you're looking for more detailed answers, go to caudata.org home page and then scroll down to newt and salamander help. I think you might be able to get some more answers from there from people with experience with newts/ salamanders specifically. you could probably also contact a breeder and see if they have advice for you. Some vets also have info on exotic animals as well. local wildlife centers/ rehab facilities/ rescues may also be a good resource to look into. hope your little guy feels better soon!
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  • FragileCorpse:
    I cant contact the vet or facilities because they keep trying to take my salamander and fine me cuz i dont have a permit. however i foudn him outside dying and nursed him back to health. So I need to be discreet about getting info. However, if anything actually becomes wrong with him, in order to save him I will have to surrender him to a vet. But thanks for the info I appreciate that
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  • FragileCorpse:
    We are about to be slammed by a category 4 hurricane. I need you guys to tell me how to saf ely transport my salamander. What kind of mobile go-terrarium can I make for him??? Can it be a plastic tote full of eco earth (cocount husk) and maybe his hidey rock and I can keep a spray bottle to keep him moist??? wtf do I do???? I have a bunch of his bugs in plastic containers thankfully so I can bring them with us. But he hates vibrations, trying to bring him out in a car or something is gonna be scary. Can these guys die of fright like a guinea pig can kind of deal???
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Maybe I should just go literally buy a smaller more mobile terrarium? Hes in a giant glass beast right now.
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  • FragileCorpse:
    Man I wish I had more than one day to plan!!! My house wont even survive this!
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  • SamAxolotl:
    @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid (I've seen a lot of people keep reptiles etc in plastic tubs their whole lives happily) Not sure about the fear/ shock aspect, but maybe bring a towel or blanket to put over the tote (if it's a clear tote, that is) as well to keep it dark for him so he doesn't get spooked by so much movement that will be going on. I've used that for other animals and it seems to be effective for keeping them calm. See if you can get your hands on some earthworms for food. they're nutritionally dense and it looks like that's one of the main things your salamander would be fed in captivity. Crickets were another suggestion for food as well. praying you all stay safe!
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    SamAxolotl: @FragileCorpse, I think a plastic tub would be fine along with a spray bottle to keep it humid... +1
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