Axolotl Hatchling

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Hello Everyone! :D

My Axolotl eggs just hatched and I know that they can feed from them anywhere between 24-72 hours until they need live food. My Axies hatched at various times so I'm trying to determine which ones need food and which ones do not as well as separating them into smaller batches. I've read that the yolk sacs are visible to the naked eye and should be cream to white in color. I *think* I see the yolk sac, but I'd like some verification. I have attached a photo of a batch on Axie hatchlings. Is the yolk sac the white that extends from the neck to the tail? Should I only start feeding them once this is gone? Both the light and dark colored Axies have them.

Thank you in advance! :giggle:

60FB2357-956D-45D9-A3AF-DC634BA87B3C.jpeg
 
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toothlessnkirby

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What resources did you use to hatch and rear your eggs? I'm on my second failed clutch. I'm heartbroken. I spend most of my day caring for my axolotls. I don't know what I'm doing wrong.
 

GulfCoastAxolotls

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What resources did you use to hatch and rear your eggs? I'm on my second failed clutch. I'm heartbroken. I spend most of my day caring for my axolotls. I don't know what I'm doing wrong.
how many are you trying to raise at once?
 

toothlessnkirby

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50 in a 20 gallon tank the first time. With no filter. Only 4 hatched.
20 in the same tank with a sponge filter. About 10 hatched this time, but only 3 look alive.
 

toothlessnkirby

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50 in a 20 gallon tank the first time. With no filter.
20 in the same tank with a sponge filter.
I just saw one of the hatchling I thought was dead do a flip then return motionless. I think maybe I should have held onto my "dead" hatchlings longer the first time around. I just figured if they were floating that was good sign they were dead. All resources I found are so basic. I wish there was more detailed guidebook. Most of links on this site are dead.
 

GulfCoastAxolotls

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50 in a 20 gallon tank the first time. With no filter. Only 4 hatched.
20 in the same tank with a sponge filter. About 10 hatched this time, but only 3 look alive.
If you have never hatched and raised axolotls before, I would suggest keeping only about 10..that is if you think you can find good homes for them. The market is already flooded with axolotls from irreputable breeders and people who didnt know any better. If you are serious about wanting to breed, please please please do you research on their genetics and proper the husbandry of hatchlings. It is A LOT of work, even for an experienced breeder. As it seems to be the case here, I see all too often people keeping more eggs than they can handle and they end up with half or more of their hatchlings dying because they just didnt want to cull the eggs. Which is more humane? culling the eggs before they begin to develop or them hatching and dying from improper care. Just my 2 cents on the subject as I receive rescues in really rough shape far more often that I'd like.

Another note, a female should not lay eggs more than twice in 12 months without health repercussions. A healthy female can lay over 500 in on go and it is very hard on them to lay all of those eggs.

That said, you're better off using shallow tubs and doing 100% water changes daily. You can place a small airstone in the tub, but it's not necessary. Keeping the water clean and a consistent temperature is key. Removing non-viable eggs early is also important, as they will begin to rot and effect your other eggs. You will know within a couple days which eggs are developing or not, the ones that are not or are clouding over, should be removed asap. Temperature is going to have a lot to do with how quickly or slowly your eggs hatch.

It will also be nearly impossible for you to feed your hatchlings in a tank that size. They are tiny, super fast, and require live food that they wont be able to catch and eat enough of in the large of a tank. Hatchlings will need to be fed fresh hatched baby brine shrimp 2 times per day, every day beginning about 24-48 hours after hatching. That means you should have one, if not 2 brine shrimp hatcheries ready to hatch brine shrimp eggs as soon at your axolotls hatch. You will have to maintain those hatcheries for a couple weeks until the axolotls are large enough to move on to their next level of food (usually either small bloodworms or blackworms). While feeding them the brine shrimp, you will need to remove any uneaten brine shrimp and do water changes usually twice a day. Brine shrimp will only survive in fresh water for a short time so they will quickly foul the water.

You are taking on a 2-3 hour per day commitement to raise them properly and maintain maximum health. Especially as they start to grow their legs and then need to be separated into pairs or smaller groups to avoid accidental nipping.
 

toothlessnkirby

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Thanks. I already know most of the stuff you mentioned and the only thing I did wrong is probably having too big of a tank and not removing the dud eggs fast enough. The hatchlings I have including my survivor from the first clutch are fed twice a day, waste scooped, and daily water changes. I did not consider the tank being too big for them to catch the brine shrimp. So surely the brine shrimp were dying before they got to them and polluting the water. Even though the water checks were awesome. I wonder if micro biomes played a part. Having my first baby in a tub is probably why he's thriving.

I have two brine shrimp hatcheries and a daphnia culture. My male and female axolotls are 3 years old now. So feel like I'm really experienced in raising axolotls. Hatching and rearing larva is new for me. I do plan on being reputable dealer. Selling to friends and family first. Then acquaintances. Then if I'm successful Ill sell personally and require buyer agreements including proof of habitat before sale. I want to use my knowledge and experiences to educate. I researched axolotls before I got mine but there was still a learning curve because there wasn't that much out there that is readily available. The pet shop I got him from was not helpful at all. Which is probably why they don't sell them anymore. My female I adopted/rescued this year. My neighbor knew I also had an axolotl. She belonged to his daughter and she went away to college. The axolotl had ammonia burns, was missing toes, and impacted. He was feeding her live fish and keep small rocks in her tank. Not to mention the water temperature wasnt monitored and she was kept in direct sunlight. If he had not rehomed her she would be dead. I brought her back to life and she is gorgeous. That experience is what made me want to breed my Axolotls.
These animals belong in the pet trade as they thrive in captivity and are functionally extinct in the wild.
You say I should do my research, but that is exactly what I'm trying to do here. I'm asking for resources and advice not criticism. I really appreciate the information you've given thus far. So if you could point me to a more comprehensive website or book or whatever. You know where you learned it from. That would be great!
 

GulfCoastAxolotls

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Thanks. I already know most of the stuff you mentioned and the only thing I did wrong is probably having too big of a tank and not removing the dud eggs fast enough. The hatchlings I have including my survivor from the first clutch are fed twice a day, waste scooped, and daily water changes. I did not consider the tank being too big for them to catch the brine shrimp. So surely the brine shrimp were dying before they got to them and polluting the water. Even though the water checks were awesome. I wonder if micro biomes played a part. Having my first baby in a tub is probably why he's thriving.

I have two brine shrimp hatcheries and a daphnia culture. My male and female axolotls are 3 years old now. So feel like I'm really experienced in raising axolotls. Hatching and rearing larva is new for me. I do plan on being reputable dealer. Selling to friends and family first. Then acquaintances. Then if I'm successful Ill sell personally and require buyer agreements including proof of habitat before sale. I want to use my knowledge and experiences to educate. I researched axolotls before I got mine but there was still a learning curve because there wasn't that much out there that is readily available. The pet shop I got him from was not helpful at all. Which is probably why they don't sell them anymore. My female I adopted/rescued this year. My neighbor knew I also had an axolotl. She belonged to his daughter and she went away to college. The axolotl had ammonia burns, was missing toes, and impacted. He was feeding her live fish and keep small rocks in her tank. Not to mention the water temperature wasnt monitored and she was kept in direct sunlight. If he had not rehomed her she would be dead. I brought her back to life and she is gorgeous. That experience is what made me want to breed my Axolotls.
These animals belong in the pet trade as they thrive in captivity and are functionally extinct in the wild.
You say I should do my research, but that is exactly what I'm trying to do here. I'm asking for resources and advice not criticism. I really appreciate the information you've given thus far. So if you could point me to a more comprehensive website or book or whatever. You know where you learned it from. That would be great!
Please dont take my advice the wrong way. I am not at all criticizing you. I am just giving you the hard truth of it because most people don't want to hear it. If you are wanting to breed them responsibly, then by all means I am more than happy to assist you. I see far too often people breed on a whim and quickly get overwhelmed and the animals are the ones who suffer for it. Its breaks my heart to see these animals so frequently mistreated. My only aim is help educate people about their proper husbandry and to caution against breeding to those that don't have the time or willingness to learn. It sounds as if you have done some good research up to this point so that's great. Breeding them is easy enough, its keeping the hatchlings healthy through development. I will link/attach here a couple useful and interesting articles for you, if you have the desire to read them. Embryology with axolotls is fascinating.


 

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toothlessnkirby

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Please dont take my advice the wrong way. I am not at all criticizing you. I am just giving you the hard truth of it because most people don't want to hear it. If you are wanting to breed them responsibly, then by all means I am more than happy to assist you. I see far too often people breed on a whim and quickly get overwhelmed and the animals are the ones who suffer for it. Its breaks my heart to see these animals so frequently mistreated. My only aim is help educate people about their proper husbandry and to caution against breeding to those that don't have the time or willingness to learn. It sounds as if you have done some good research up to this point so that's great. Breeding them is easy enough, its keeping the hatchlings healthy through development. I will link/attach here a couple useful and interesting articles for you, if you have the desire to read them. Embryology with axolotls is fascinating.


TYSM! Sorry if I was defensive. I am vegan for the animals 20 years now. So animal welfare is top of my list everyday. I hope my contribution will help the axolotls in more ways than one.
 

GulfCoastAxolotls

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TYSM! Sorry if I was defensive. I am vegan for the animals 20 years now. So animal welfare is top of my list everyday. I hope my contribution will help the axolotls in more ways than one.
You're welcome. I am glad the tub seems to be working for your surviving hatchlings. Shallow tubs are definitely much easier to clean and feed in. It's much less stressful on the hatchlings to be able to get to their food easily. I love watching hatchlings pop up when they eat. I could, and have, sat there and watched them eat and swim around for hours.

Having the daphnia culture as a backup will be a big help too, especially if one of your brine shrimp hatcheries crash (which can happen).
 

toothlessnkirby

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You're welcome. I am glad the tub seems to be working for your surviving hatchlings. Shallow tubs are definitely much easier to clean and feed in. It's much less stressful on the hatchlings to be able to get to their food easily. I love watching hatchlings pop up when they eat. I could, and have, sat there and watched them eat and swim around for hours.

Having the daphnia culture as a backup will be a big help too, especially if one of your brine shrimp hatcheries crash (which can happen).
I have wasted away in front of my aquariums for months now. Lol.
 
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