Desmognathus fuscus/conanti

M

mark

Guest
After a couple of months of trail and error I think I’ve created a set-up that fits the bill for Desmognathus fuscus/conanti. Their first set-up had hides of both cork and slate with varying depths of water from 1cm through to completely dry. Their preference was for the rock and a water depth of ~ 1-2mm although the suitability of the hide primarily relies on how snug it is, the smaller the gap the better. Hides that had more than 1cm of height were rejected in preference for tighter gaps. Aquatic hides are also used where the animal can safely stick it’s head out of the water without being too exposed. Essentially they have a preference for tight, wet spaces which offer the smallest amount of exposure. This set-up is made up entirely of slate piled up and gives them a large area of hides.

The water at the front of the tank is about 2 inches deep. I’ve occasionally seen them in the water at night but they tend to prowl around the shore line. I started off with a powerhead that created a stream effect over the rocks but the heat it generated was too great, so I’ve replaced it with a long air stone bubbler which creates water movement and splashes the rocks to keep them wet.
I haven’t seen any territorial behaviour but have witnessed squabbles over food. When they find a preferred hide they tend to jam themselves in like sardines and are tolerant of each other.

They are good feeders and despite being wild caught already accept food offered in tweezers.
Does anyone have pictures of desmog set-ups they wish to share? I’d be interested to hear others experiences with this species. Any captive breeding success?
 
W

william

Guest
I like the set-up Mark! I might use something similar myself. currently mine are in bark and moss with a water reservoir.
 
C

chris

Guest
I hiding habits, these seem very similar to my Hynobius (I know, unrelated apart from their both being caudates...). I use those insulation/decorative bricks you can get - the ones with the holes cut into them. These are half submerged in water and topped in moss, so that you get sort of apartment blocks ranging from below the water line all the way up to pretty dry. Thesalamanders never have to stick moore than their head out unless they are at the botoom of the water area, and the moss provides some screening fromthe front.

The pic below is extremely terrible, and the setup has changed since it was taken, but you can see the bricks I mean (white arrows where the holes are visible). This type of brick surrounds the hole water area, the rest consists of broken pottery and bits of other things, all covered with moss.
Chris

 
M

mark

Guest
I think Chris is showing us his H.dunni set-up as a comparison, Will. I've seen a few members using those bricks, I may have to get myself some. Do they sell them at B&Q?

When they move they are quite eel like in appearance and can squeeze themselves into the tightest gaps in rocks.
 
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  • Mark.H:
    Great! I'll use some of those too. Thanks for the help. :)
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  • Tinky:
    So everywhere talks about testing your water parameters but I can't find what to do it there aren't right?! Like too low not too high, anybody any ideas?
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  • jnerdx:
    It’s very dry in Colorado. I make sure to spritz every night so while I’m sleeping. I have a nifty hydrometer that I got from Walmart. It tells me blue, green, red; too little humid, good, too much respectively. It’s been helpful to me.
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  • jnerdx:
    It tells me temperature AND humidity.
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  • MVM1991:
    Where'd you get that? Or is it just a combo from petsmart or something?
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  • jnerdx:
    I’m pretty sure I got it at a Walmart.
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  • jnerdx:
    I just looked it up to see if I can find it again. It’s actually a hyGROmeter and temperature. Which measures the dew point. Here is the difference between due point and humidity. https://www.weather.gov/arx/why_dewpoint_vs_humidityYou can calculate Th relative
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  • jnerdx:
    the relative humidity using the dew point measurement.
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  • jnerdx:
    Here is the product I purchased:
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  • jnerdx:
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  • jnerdx:
    it has a stand. And I had a spare suction from my filter. So it’s on the wall of my Sal’s enclosure.
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  • jnerdx:
    That’s a pic of it in the enclosure.
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  • MVM1991:
    Nice! Also, from what I can see you have an amazing setup! What species?
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  • jnerdx:
    S. S. Gigliolli
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  • MVM1991:
    Ooo nice!
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  • jnerdx:
    Thank you! I tried to share the video but unsuccessful. You can see it on my IG story @jnerdx
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  • MVM1991:
    Cool! I just have a tiger and a long tail, who we are trying to find as he ESCAPED INTO MY ROOM!
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  • LauraLobster:
    Hey y'all, recently my juvenile axolotl's tail has been floating and can swim down but his tail lifts to an angle and I believe that it is stressing him out. He gets in between his plants to balance himself and I am cleaning out the bottom of the tank with my baster. I believe I overfed him and he also may have eaten many air bubbles. He's been like this for nearly 1 1/2 days.
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  • LauraLobster:
    What would be the best thing to do ?
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    Redear has joined the room.
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  • Mark.H:
    Hey, does anyone know if hot glue is fine to glue rocks together?
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  • MVM1991:
    Should be. Hot glue is good when dry I believe, just don't let it get too hot and you should be good. Most super glues are good as well just watch out for flume warnings
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  • Mark.H:
    Ok, thanks! I am going to glue together the shale I mentioned.
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    Mark.H: Ok, thanks! I am going to glue together the shale I mentioned. +1
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