Question: Good bottom feeding partners?

endersblade

New member
Joined
Jul 8, 2014
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Portland, OR
Country
United States
I have a 40 gallon long tank that, come the right season, will have some Chinese fire bellies in it. The tank currently houses some African dwarf frogs and some feeder fish of sorts, to get the tank going. I also have two plecos.

However, I picked these plecos up when they were only about 2 inches long. They're now about 6 each, and I'm assuming they will keep growing. This tank won't be big enough for two full grown plecos. I'm sorry to say I didn't know they got so big when I bought them! I've only ever seen little small ones.

The tank has an avg. temp around 68F. Happy medium for the frogs and newts both, and the plecos and feeder fish don't seem to mind. I've done some searching and all the algae/bottom feeders I find seem to require higher temperatures.

Everything in the tank is doing just fine, the plants are green, moss is spreading, no fish have died. I'm just afraid those darned plecos are going to get to the point where the tank can't support them.

There aren't/won't be any aggressive fishes in the tank. I just need pleco replacements! A local store is willing to take the plecos, so they will go to a good home. I most certainly will not be flushing them lol.
 

xxianxx

Well-known member
Joined
May 19, 2011
Messages
2,571
Reaction score
59
Points
48
Location
South Wales, Gwent
Country
Wales
Display Name
nai live
Common plecos get to 2ft, they are also known to kill axolotls by sucking their slime layer off, so are a potential risk to other amphibians. The temp requirements for dwarf clawed frogs and firebellys do not overlap. Firebellies also secrete toxins which could have a negative effect long term on the frogs. Newts are best kept in a single species tank with inverts, the frogs are OK with small non aggressive fish like endlers and inverts. Species mixing is generally not a good idea, if you check "species mixing disasters" on this site you will see why.
 

ThoseNewtsTho

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2013
Messages
852
Reaction score
24
Points
18
Age
22
Location
KS
Country
United States
Display Name
Aaron
Assuming you are going to buy these newts from the petstore, I recommend that you don't. Petstore newts are wild caught from Asia and imported in terrible conditions. And when they arrive then often refuse water and even food.
Whats best is to find a reputable breeder. But finding CB H. orientalis could be difficult and may take some time. But there are some other fully aquatic(only need a piece of floating cork bark if anything) that do well in planted tanks like H. orientalis. A similar newt that is easy to find CB is P. waltl, they both have relatively similar care but they get bigger than H. orientalis do.
 

Azhael

Site Contributor
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
92
Points
0
Location
Burgos
Country
Spain
Display Name
Rodrigo
That is not a suitable environment for any newt species. If you want to keep some newts you are going to need to provide them with their own fishless tank and i also strongly recommend that you look for a suitable, captive-bred species rather than pet-shop bought H.orientalis which are a terrible choice.
 

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
64
Points
48
Location
Chesterfield, England
Country
England
Apart from anything else, taking on a common Plec is a long term commitment. I've had mine for well over twenty years (obviously not kept with any of my newts) and I've heard they can live much longer than that.
 

endersblade

New member
Joined
Jul 8, 2014
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Portland, OR
Country
United States
That is not a suitable environment for any newt species. If you want to keep some newts you are going to need to provide them with their own fishless tank and i also strongly recommend that you look for a suitable, captive-bred species rather than pet-shop bought H.orientalis which are a terrible choice.
Yeah, I plan on getting CB.

When I was in my teens, I had a tank with three fire bellies, two African dwarf frogs, and two algae eaters of some sort that my parents got me. Everything was just fine up until I enlisted and had to get rid of them. They all lasted about four or five years. I've watched vids of FBs and other fish. Coming here is the first time in my life I have ever heard not to raise newts with other fish. I have absolutely no doubt you guys know what you're talking about, I'm just saying that from personal experience, it hasn't been an issue. And it'll all be in a much bigger tank than I had back then.
 

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
64
Points
48
Location
Chesterfield, England
Country
England
Five years is a ridiculously short life for a fire belly of any kind. In the wild they would probably just be maturing at that age.
 

endersblade

New member
Joined
Jul 8, 2014
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Portland, OR
Country
United States
Five years is a ridiculously short life for a fire belly of any kind. In the wild they would probably just be maturing at that age.
Did I ever say they died? I enlisted, I couldn't take them with me. My parents sold the whole setup to someone. I have no idea how long they lived beyond the four or five that I had them.
 

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
64
Points
48
Location
Chesterfield, England
Country
England
Sorry, it was the bit where you said "they all lasted for four or five years." that threw me.
 

Chinadog

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
2,685
Reaction score
64
Points
48
Location
Chesterfield, England
Country
England
I'm sorry for being kranky. :) The thing is though, very few newts will coexist with fish if given the choice If you force them to share a tank you will end up with newts that are either constantly trying to escape, or sitting on their island all the time. Snails or freshwater shrimp are great as a clean up crew.
 

Azhael

Site Contributor
Joined
May 7, 2007
Messages
6,645
Reaction score
92
Points
0
Location
Burgos
Country
Spain
Display Name
Rodrigo
Many species will only inhabit water bodies that have no fish in them. They will actively seek such places and abandon those were they can chemically sense the pressence of fish. In captivity, like Chinadog said, forcing them to share space can lead to the newts constantly trying to abandon the water but more seriously, the stress caused by the cohabitation can result in weakened inmune systems and the development of infections. Just because you didn't notice any issues that other time it doesn't mean there weren't any or that there won't be any next time.
You can sometimes get away with a few small, non-agressive fish like white cloud minows in a large, heavily planted tank, but even then they can be a problem.
Also, 68ºF was ok for the newts, but was well below the optimum for the frogs and on the lower range for the plecos. Such compromises are not happy mediums, they are suboptimal conditions.

If you provide suitable conditions for the newts and avoid taking completely unnecessary risks like forcing unsuitable tankmates on them, you could enjoy your newts for a VERY long time and watch them thrive, happily breeding every year and behaving naturally.
 
General chit-chat
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • k.em:
    hello Anyone can sell tylototriton?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    Matt Edgar has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • einarrito:
    I have a siren that has 2 white spots on it, wondering g if anyone could help
    +1
    Unlike
  • Crystal:
    I am looking for some help in any sick salamander care
    +1
    Unlike
  • tduzz:
    I have an old axolotl free to a good home in MA
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    Cordealia has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • ChocoUniversa:
    Hello?
    +1
    Unlike
  • ChocoUniversa:
    Why am I here
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    ChocoUniversa has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    ChocoUniversa has joined the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • ChocoUniversa:
    Does anyone have anything on how to cycle an axolotl tank before getting the axolotl?
    +1
    Unlike
  • ChocoUniversa:
    Why is there a red 2 next to the room
    +1
    Unlike
  • Chat Bot:
    ChocoUniversa has left the room.
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    +1
    Unlike
  • ellarose:
    Go to the fishless cycle tab :)
    +1
    Unlike
  • MidgetMan:
    @tduzz, where do you live? Like roughly. What country are you in?
    +1
    Unlike
  • tduzz:
    @MidgetMan, Massachusetts but I can give anywhere in the new England area
    +1
    Unlike
  • AMurry24537:
    @ChocoUniversa, Buy some ammonia and an eyedropper from Walmart and a water test kit for ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Figure out (through testing) how many drops it will take to get the ammonia level to the test's maximum measurement. Add that same number of drops every 24 hours. Eventually, the ammonia will start to go down as it's converted to nitrites. Keep adding ammonia. The nitrite levels will spike for a while and then they too will start to go down as they convert to nitrates. These you get rid of by doing water changes, which you should be doing anyway throughout the process. Once all of these are at low levels, your aquarium is ready. It takes about a month, maybe two (mine took a month and a half). Be sure to add ammonia until the day of or the day before you add your axolotl.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Kmia_13:
    Hey guys, this is my first time using this so bear with me. I have an adult axie who looks like he’s developed some fungus on gills. It’s still really small and only on one part. I put him in a 10 gal quarantine tank with an Indian almond leaf. I want to give him a black tea bath but not sure if I can add my black tea to the tank with the Indian almond leaf in there. Any advice?
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Hi, My axolotl has just started morphing, but has some fungal spot behind the gill.
    +1
    Unlike
  • Gillygills:
    Should I fridge therapy and salt wash? or will this not be wise when she is morphing.
    +1
    Unlike
  • BChen3695:
    Need help identifying what’s wrong with my axolotl
    +1
    Unlike
  • Unlike
  • Unlike
  • madcaplaughs:
    @BChen3695, what are your parameters and temp? The fact that they're raised bumps could indicate fungus or bacterial infection.
    +2
    Unlike
    madcaplaughs: @BChen3695, what are your parameters and temp? The fact that they're raised bumps could indicate... +2
    Top