Lesser Siren FUNGUS!

Neotenic_Jaymes

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My lesser siren has developed a fungus on its top left gill. I'm not sure how I should approach this situation. With my newts and non-siren salamanders I usually salt the water that they are currently living in or take the axolotl out and give it salt baths. I did already add a little salt into its tank but not much. Is there a certain method I should use?
 

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Greatwtehunter

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Just give it a salt bath like you would an axolotl...just in a larger container. :D
 

AaronK

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I had a similar issue with my lesser siren and put it in the fridge for a couple days with good success.
 

Neotenic_Jaymes

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Thanks Justin, thanks Aaron! I've considered both. I'll keep the Siren in the basement where its about 42 degrees. I'll do salt baths every other day till everything seems better. Cooling and salt baths. Thank you both!
 

Neotenic_Jaymes

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Here is an update on my lesser siren. Salt baths worked fine but since I've never applied a salt bath to a siren so I used a smaller amount of salt for the "salt baths". Obviously since I used minimal salt I had to apply more salt baths. Maybe if I used larger doses of salt my siren would have been fungus free sooner. I took the route of precaution.

Incase other siren keepers out there suffer the same situation. I put my siren in a 10 gallon tank filled with about 2-3 gallons of water. I used about 0.5 of a spoon of salt and left the siren in there for about 15 minutes. Everyday till the fungus fell away. The damaged gill is now growing back.
 

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Caudae

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This is good news! That looked like a pretty aggressive fungus!

I have used Meracyn Oxy (common in pet stores) with good success too on gill fungus, just dose for your aquarium size, then add enough for about another 10gal., treat every day up to 3 days (I wouldn't do any more days than that). If still present, salt bath it in colder temps!
 
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  • MadamePirateOwl:
    The second image was how it looked the first time, it was mixed with some other poop like stuff. after that its been small and without the poopy stuff
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  • madcaplaughs:
    The second photo looks reminiscent of partially-digested worms, though I've never seen anything like that. Have you checked your parameters lately?
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  • MadamePirateOwl:
    Right now theyre in smaller tubs that i do daily water changes in
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  • MadamePirateOwl:
    I'll admit Ive bought test strips but they havent come in yet
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  • MadamePirateOwl:
    I use Prime to dechlorinate the water, which was recommend by the girl I got them from
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  • madcaplaughs:
    For now I'd tub the axolotl and do daily 100% water changes until you're able to test your parameters
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  • madcaplaughs:
    I'd also recommend ordering a liquid test kit such as the API Freshwater Master Test Kit since strips are generally unreliable and inaccurate.
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  • MadamePirateOwl:
    Okay, thank you for your help and advice :)
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  • k.em:
    anybody growing tylototriton?
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    hi I’m looking for some insight, it would really help if you could check out what I have written^
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    Hey so does anyone ever update this site. I mean the photo contest from 2012..
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    Wait in finding newer posts in different forums
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  • Chelsea smith:
    Hello! Anyone there right now by chance? I have a couple questions about plants in an axolotl tank.
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  • Junaz:
    @Chelsea smith, Hi, what questions did you have?
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  • Chelsea smith:
    Hi! I was wondering if anyone knew if java fern, the floaters like frog bit, anubis, and moss balls could be all kept without any substrate with the axies? I have sand right now with an axie who is over a year but we were just testing the waters really but I continously read about a lot of health issues with sand impacting constipation and hiding bad bacteria and such, we just want to make him comfy.
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  • Junaz:
    I don't know about the java ferns, but the moss balls and anything that floats on the surface of the water should be totally fine! I'm not saying the java ferns aren't an option, I just personally don't know if they can live without some sort of substrate
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  • Littlewolf:
    Java ferns actually do better when they are attached to a piece of wood or other decor anyway. Their rhizomes can be easily burried in sand and then they dont grow properly. The others can also be kept without sand no problem.
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  • madcaplaughs:
    @Chelsea smith All of the plants you've listed can be kept without substrate. Plants with rhizomes cannot be submerged in substrate, as burying the rhizome will cause the plant to suffocate and rot. You can pin these plants under on onto decoration, rocks, etc., just be careful that the rhizome is not in substrate. Moss balls and floating plants, naturally, do not need substrate either. Do note that floating plants require a good amount of light.
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  • Paige1warren:
    Hi guys, I have an 11 month old axoltol who is about 9 inches long. She normally is a pig when it comes to food. I switch between pellets and night crawlers, and sometimes blood worms if she had a big meal the day before. Anyways, I went to go feed her a night crawler today, and she wouldn’t eat it! She turned her head and went to the corner. I noticed that when I cut this worm it seems to release a lot more goop then other worms I’ve cut, I tried to wash it off the best I could with cold water. Do you think maybe she didn’t want to eat it because of that? She normally will eat anything in front of her face. Water perimeters are perfectly normal by the way, and temp is at a steady 63 degrees F.
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  • Paige1warren:
    Also, she looks perfectly fine. Tail is straight, gills aren’t curled, no fungus or anything. It’s probably no big deal, it’s just unusual behavior for her so it really caught my eye. Love my girl and want to make sure everything’s ok.
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    Paige1warren: Also, she looks perfectly fine. Tail is straight, gills aren’t curled, no fungus or anything... +1
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