Looking into planted tank w/ Eastern newt efts and fish?

Newtbaby

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Hello. I have been doing some research, and I have some questions.. I have owned Eastern Newts before (always efts), and they're a lot of fun to keep. I was interested in some of the mixed fish and amphibian tanks, and wanted to give it a go myself. I wanted Eastern Newt Efts, so I based the rest of the tank around them. I planned on getting one of the "reptile terrariums", which are really just long tanks with doors that open on the front for easy access (about 5 inches for water/substrate below doors). I pictured 1/4 of the tank water, about a 20 gallon long tank.. So not too much. With custom cut glass, 3 pieces so that I can form an almost circle shaped water area in one front corner. Then use some aquarium silicone to glue some pebbles to the glass where the water will be (the glass will be at an angle so they can climb in and out of the water easily, the pebbles will help them get hold). With Exo Terra Plantation soil, along with some regular potting soil for the plants, for substrate.. I will make more hills and levels for the newts so they have as much space as possible. Then some live plants, in the water I was hoping to get some java moss and water wisteria to start out.. Seeing as those are pretty basic-low need plants. Then on land probably some carpet moss and ferns, any other suggestions? I would like a heavily planted tank (one that will continue to grow), so I need a few more plant types I'm sure. A light, small filter and such. I was wondering if I should put gravel or some other "ground" on the bottom of the water area? I'm assuming they may need other things for the roots to be able to grow into. What rocks\logs\branches should I be looking into? And what kind of fish are compatible with an eastern? I was thinking maybe some guppies or minnows, and ghost shrimp.. Keeping them pretty small. I planned on having 4 easterns.. Is that too many? Not enough? I want it to be pretty active, so its fun to look at.. But I also want them to be healthy and not over crowded. I was also wondering if I should have a false bottom for the land part? Or if there was an easier alternative.. I don't really want to have to rip up all of the plant roots and such to fix anything that ends up going wrong. And what light would be best? And is it safe for adding any type of frog sometime in the future?
 

Kaysie

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Given that efts are completely terrestrial, I wouldn't do any water area at all as the risk of them drowning is high.

Otherwise, I'd say that kind of setup would be fine for 4 easterns (no other amphibs).
 
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