Melanophryniscus Stelzneri

troll85

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Hi!
Today I bought two ( 1 male : 1 female) Melanophryniscus Stelzneri.They are 1 years old.
Now they are in a terrarium ( 45 liters; 50X30X30) structured according to their requirements.
The "problem" is that the male is singing.....I thought that it was better to wait at least 6-7 months ( or 1 year ) to test a "possible reproduction".
What do you think..? Have I to try the reproduction now or no?
Thanks
 

mshine1217

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Are they in the same enclosure. If you don't want to breed them right away, then you want to separate them. If they are a year old, the male is singing and the female seems willing then I don't believe that there's a problem. If you aren't ready to deal with offspring, then by all means separate them and wait until later.
 

TylototritonGuy

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No, to put it simply. Don't try breeding of them just yet, as their are a few factors you would want to take into account prior to breeding which include the individuals Weight and what you would need to encourage breeding (just because he is "Singing"/Calling doesn't mean he is wanting to breed or that the Female is ready to herself).

You want to make sure that they are at a decent weight prior to breeding, but even before they go into breeding season, you would want to decrease their food intake for a few weeks and also decrease their ambient temperature for the period too. Also, do you have a "Rain Chamber" prepared to put them into? As they won't breed in a completely terrestrial set up.

Here is a quote from a Care & Breeding Sheet you can find on Frog Forum;

Breeding

The breeding info given here is the method I learned by trial and error. It has worked well for me but it is certainly not set in stone and you may achieve better results by varying one or more aspects of my methods. This description is only intended to offer a good starting point for someone that has no idea where to begin. Such things are not an exact science so don’t be afraid to experiment a little.

I begin the breeding process by placing the female toads in a refrigerator at approximately 4-10
°C (40-50 °F) for approximately 4-5 days. This simulates “winter” and I have not found any more time to be necessary to stimulate the females to begin to develop eggs. It is not necessary to refrigerate the males at all, as I have found them to be simulated to clasp primarily by the “rain”, but refrigeration can be carried out if desired and no harm will result. After removing the females from the refrigerator, I place them in a small container at room temperature and feed them very heavily for approximately a week and a half. It is especially important to make certain that the females have all the food that they can possibly eat at this time or they may not develop eggs.

After around a week and a half I put all of the toads I wish to breed in a rain chamber. I prefer an ordinary household shower, as the water comes out more forcefully than most pump-type rain chambers.
Where I live we have our own well, so nothing is added to the household water, but for most people this is not an option, and a safer method is to use a rain chamber with a pump recirculating tap water that has been treated with a proprietary dechlorinator like Amquel or Aquasafe.

I feel that my shower method this more closely simulates the heavy rainstorms that precede breeding in the wild. At any rate, it works for me. I just make certain that there is no soap or similar products on or in the shower that could harm them. I also see to it that the drain is covered with wire or plastic netting so the toads can’t go down the drain! After taking the necessary precautions, I leave them in the rain chamber for approximately half an hour. Then I raise the water level to 2.5-5 cm (1-2 inches) in depth. At this point I put a few things in for them to climb out on (sticks, plants, rocks, etc.), and I let the water run for the next hour. After about an hour and a half in the rain chamber I remove the toads to a well-planted (Pothos, sphagnum moss, etc.), gravel-based aquarium, 1/4 land and 3/4 water, with a water depth of 2.5-7.5 cm (1-3 inches). The males have often already embraced the females in amplexus when removed from the rain chamber. If not, they usually do so within a few hours of being placed in the aquarium. The eggs are usually laid by the following afternoon. If no eggs are laid by then, it becomes increasingly improbable that any will be. In that case, I return the toads to their normal setup. The males will release the females shortly.[/QUOTE]
Like he said, this isn't set in stone and like anything it IS all trial and error but just because you have calling from a male, doesn't mean the female is ready to produce eggs.

Hope this helps,

TyloGuy
 

joshfrogz72

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when is a good time to cool down the females in the fridge? also 40 degrees is fin eit wont kill the females?
 
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