Paper of interest

Kevin Z

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hi all, I thought some might be interested in the attached paper (it's the second note in the paper, not the first).

cheers, Kevin
 

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  • Bernardo_and_Arnold_1999-mass_rearing_of_pleth_eggs[1].pdf
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John

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Re: paper of interest

Hi Kevin,

Thanks for sharing this. I've moved this thread to the Plethodontid section of the forum.

Best wishes,

-John
 

taherman

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I'd have to say most surprising to me is the bit at the end, where they successfully raised eggs from Plethodon underwater...
 

Kevin Z

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hey Tim, (thanks for this paper, by the way!). yup, that was surprising about raising the terrestrial eggs underwater. I have seen other species with eggs on the waterline that could go either way, provided sufficient oxygenation of the water (Theloderma, mantellas, some Tylototriton/Echinotriton, hylids, etc.). but woodland salamanders? crazy. I also sent the paper to some Eleutherodactylus guys, some of whom are having trouble with eggs, especially when they remove them. I bet a motivated, technically handy individual such as yourself could make their own automated flow-through egg washers for less than $650...maybe a 'hydroponic'-like system with ebbing and flowing water...
cheers

I'd have to say most surprising to me is the bit at the end, where they successfully raised eggs from Plethodon underwater...
 

taherman

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Yeah I was checking out their website, looks like they just use vinyl coated fiberglass screens to set the eggs on, hard to see what the water flow is like from the photos though. Maybe we'll have enough Hemidactylium eggs this spring to do some experimenting.

Welcome to Caudata.org! Looks like the Aark fundraising drive is going pretty well, whichever party initiated, it was a great idea. Thanks for reminding me about that paper...one of the references in it uses LHRH on Gyrinophilus successfully, I may have to try that on one of our display P. ruber with years of retained eggs.

-Tim
 

Kevin Z

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another one you might be interested in:

Cameron, C., S. Beug and C. Tsilfidis. 2004. Captive breeding of Notophthalmus viridescens through Hormonal manipulation. Herpetological Review. 35 (3):257-259.

we used the technique with some success on the same species in the NACC. it didn't scale up to Andrias though! if memory serves, it involved HCG.
 

rust

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Very interesting article. But I find the use of the term "most" for P.jordani vague. My experience with Ensatina and Aneides is that excessive moisture late in development causes premature hatching and death. Though I'm going to have to ponder the possibility of trying this, at least once.
 

taherman

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My experience with Ensatina and Aneides is that excessive moisture late in development causes premature hatching and death.

That was my experience with the D. aeneus eggs too, and I've seen rain trigger hatching in Hemidactylium. However the eggs may reach some sort of osmotic balance early in development and it's the sudden change that triggers hatching. Dunno.

-Tim
 
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I know I'm getting in here kind of late, but I used to work at a fish hatchery and they used a technique that might prove equally as helpful. They had long acrylic cylinders filled with water and they would run a stream of water up from the bottom of the cylinder. The current would gently roll the eggs to keep them oxygenated and clean. They are pretty easy to make, you could even use a large mason jar. I would think you could use a large, fine air stone in the bottom of the jar to keep the water flowing and keep it well oxygenated. Anyway, thank you posting this paper, I found it very interesting.
 
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