Plastic tubs in the cold?

slowfoot

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Hey all,

Our new house has a potting/storage shed in the backyard that would make a pretty nice newt house. I was thinking of setting up a permanent newt operation in there. The main issue is that we live in northern Indiana and it gets pretty cold up here in the winter. The shed has power and lights but no heat (and a lot of windows, so it will get about as cold as it does outside in there).

I'd like to keep using Rubbermaid-type plastic tubs because they're cheap and big. I was thinking of using aquarium heaters to keep the water from freezing in the tubs. Does this sound like a disaster waiting to happen? I think either way, I'll try out a tub w/ a heater but without newts this winter and see how it goes.
 

Greatwtehunter

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Mine seem to do alright in the cold. Just keep in mind, they are a little easier to break due to the cold if you ever have to move them.
 

Jake

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Rubbermaid makes stock tanks like this: Robyn's Basement Pond Page 2 in various sizes. They are made of thick, strong plastic and my 2 have endured years of being outside during the winter here in northern Illinois. The only problem is if the ice gets too thick it may cause damage (from expanding), but if you're keeping newts in it I'm assuming there will be minimal ice cover. I've kept adult P.waltl in them indoors before with good luck. It's nice because waltl aren't known for their climbing skills and the tubs have no corners to allow it if they wanted to. I would use a lid if they're juveniles though.
 

slowfoot

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Thanks for the tips!

The tubs will have lids since my guys are pretty good at climbing. I'll probably try out a couple different tub types (and heaters) to see what works.
 
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